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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Updike, John Hoyer Born 1932. American writer particularly known for his tragicomic novels, such as Rabbit, Run (1960) and Rabbit at Rest (1990), concerning the trials of middle-class suburbanites.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A surname.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. United States author (born 1932)

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Updike is brilliant at descriptions and even more brilliant at creating a feel of the times, an atmosphere that saturates every sentence without being located in any particular word.

    On John Updike « Tales from the Reading Room

  • It's a loss for Reading that Updike is no longer present to observe the Goggleworks arts complex, housed in a former goggle mill, especially to imagine how one of this fall's offerings, "Yogi Bear," might take a place in the sequence of movies shown in Brewer in the novels, from those that Rabbit saw ( "2001: A Space Odyssey") to those that he did not ( "Honeymoon in Swampland").

    Keystone to Updike's Imagination

  • Ask a fan of Jewel's poetry who Etheridge Knight or John Updike is and they will probably cock their heads to the side like a curious doggie who heard Lassie bark on the magical TV box.

    Friday Rant: The Step Scale of Publications that Pay

  • However, Updike is a much better writer overall and definitely knows how to write much better stories than this Webster guy does.

    The Merriam-Webster English Dictionary « Books « Literacy News

  • Rabbit at Rest_ is the only one that really doesn't do it for me; my sense of disgust at the title character becomes more than just the odd tang at the edge of the pleasure I take in Updike's narration, it fatally taints the dish.

    Rabbit's Run

  • In some ways, the critical response to John Updike's recent work seems to me similar to that accorded to Harold Bloom's, even though Updike is a novelist and Bloom a critic.

    Updike, John

  • It allows Wood to make the same kind of criticism that has always been made of Updike, but to dress it up in fancier crittalk ( "free indirect style"): Updike is too besotted with language.

    Updike, John

  • Those not interested in Updike's fiction -- and there are perfectly good reasons why one might not have had a positive response to Updike, on which more later -- can of course simply skip these posts.

    Updike, John

  • John Updike is certainly in the final analysis a writer who has produced such fiction, even if one does have to pick and choose when surveying his very large body of work.

    Updike, John

  • (Even a writer as conventional as John Updike is sometimes attacked for these sins.)

    Style in Fiction

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