Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An official in charge of a royal forest; in modern times, still extant in the New Forest and the Forest of Dean

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French verdier, Late Latin viridarius, from Latin viridis green.

Examples

  • Sir James Campbell, who was for between thirty and forty years the chief "Verderer," or principal government officer of the

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • The title "Verderer" is Norman, indicating the administration of all that relates to the "Vert" or "Greenery" of the Forest; that is, of the timber, the enclosures, the roads, and the surface generally.

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • The Verderer is carrying on the annual record of their measurements.

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • Two miles lower than the bridge is the Forest port of Lydney, now chiefly used for shipping coal; and as the ex-Verderer of the Forest resides near it, and he would be able to furnish information of interest to our American visitor, we decided to drive to Lydney to begin.

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • From Lydney a drive of a few miles through pleasant ups and downs of woodland and field, brings us to Whitemead Park, the official residence of the Verderer, Philip Baylis.

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • Before us is the railed-off dais, at the end, where the Verderer and his assistants sit to administer the law.

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • At this point the Verderer had to settle some matter of the instant, but he put us under the care of a young man who acted as our guide to one of the ancient and giant oaks of the Forest, on the "Church Hill" enclosure, about three-quarters of a mile up the hill above the Park.

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • Since writing this paper I find that Philip Baylis, the Verderer of the Forest of Dean, has kindly sent three or four dozen of young oak trees from the Government plantations, to Washington, in order that they may be planted there and in some other places in the United States, to begin the century with.

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

  • _mote_ evidence was required from _three_ witnesses in each case, on which the Verderer and other officers of the king passed sentence in accordance with the laws laid down in this

    Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2

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