Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of Yugoslav.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Yugoslavs are another example of where people are not always related to the languages that they speak.

    languagehat.com: SLAVONIAN.

  • The Yugoslavs were a large landowner, a doctor and

    The Birth of Yugoslavia, Volume 2

  • They care not how many Estonians, Latvians, Finns, Poles, Yugoslavs or Greeks get murdered or mistreated as D [isplaced] P [ersons] as long as the Jews get special treatment.

    Matthew Yglesias » Israel Politics Circa 1947

  • Here it should be explained that on challenging, the Yugoslavs always added the word “partisani” whereas the German gave the harsh “halt” and if no password was at once given, opened fire.

    Walter (Bill) Gossner

  • They care not how many Estonians, Latvians, Finns, Poles, Yugoslavs or Greeks get murdered or mistreated as D [isplaced] P [ersons] as long as the Jews get special treatment.

    Matthew Yglesias » Israel Politics Circa 1947

  • They care not how many Estonians, Latvians, Finns, Poles, Yugoslavs or Greeks get murdered or mistreated as D [isplaced] P [ersons] as long as the Jews get special treatment.

    Matthew Yglesias » Getting Closer to Nowhere

  • When the dust had settled and all those who wished to had returned home, there remained in Germany, Austria and Italy a residue of some 1 million people who were mot inclined to go back to their own countries - Jews, Poles, Ukrainians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Estonians, and Yugoslavs.

    Menachem Rosensaft: Review: The Long Road Home, The Aftermath of the Second World War

  • It is a country which began inviting Turks, Italians, Yugoslavs, as early as the 1960s to come in and be what were called guest workers.

    Multiculturalism Debated In The U.S. And Abroad

  • When the dust had settled and all those who wished to had returned home, there remained in Germany, Austria and Italy a residue of some 1 million people who were mot inclined to go back to their own countries - Jews, Poles, Ukrainians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Estonians, and Yugoslavs.

    Menachem Rosensaft: Review: The Long Road Home, The Aftermath of the Second World War

  • Even when all those who wanted to return home had been helped to do so, there were still in Germany and Austria more than a million Poles, Ukrainians, Latvians, Jews, Yugoslavs and others who did not wish to go back.

    No Way Back

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