Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or being a grammatical case indicating separation, direction away from, sometimes manner or agency, and the object of certain verbs. It is found in Latin and other Indo-European languages.
  • n. The ablative case.
  • n. A word in this case.
  • adj. Of, relating to, or capable of ablation.
  • adj. Tending to ablate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Taking away or removing.
  • adj. Applied to one of the cases of the noun in Latin and some other languages, -- the fundamental meaning of the case being removal, separation, or taking away.
  • The ablative case.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Taking or tending to take away; tending to remove; pertaining to ablation.
  • In grammar, noting removal or separation: applied to a case which forms part of the original declension of nouns and pronouns in the languages of the Indo-European family, and has been retained by some of them, as Latin, Sanskrit, and Zend, while in some it is lost, or merged in another case, as in the genitive in Greek. It is primarily the from-case.
  • Pertaining to or of the nature of the ablative case: as, an ablative construction.
  • n. In grammar, short for ablative case. See ablative, adjective, 2. Often abbreviated to abl.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. relating to the ablative case
  • adj. tending to ablate; i.e. to be removed or vaporized at very high temperature
  • n. the case indicating the agent in passive sentences or the instrument or manner or place of the action described by the verb

Etymologies

Middle English, from Latin ablātīvus, from ablātus, carried away; see ablation.
From ablation.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • This is clearly an ablative relation, and the construction is called the «ablative of the measure of difference».

    Latin for Beginners

  • _ The ablative denoting the _place where_ is called the _locative ablative_ (cf. «locus», _place_).

    Latin for Beginners

  • This idea is expressed in Latin by the ablative without a preposition, and the construction is called the «ablative of cause»:

    Latin for Beginners

  • This idea is expressed in Latin by the ablative without a preposition, and the construction is called the «ablative of means»:

    Latin for Beginners

  • This idea is expressed in Latin by the ablative with the preposition «cum», and the construction is called the «ablative of accompaniment»:

    Latin for Beginners

  • Father of Eleven calls his blog Nihilo, the ablative case of the Latin word for nothing.

    WWJHMD? - BatesLine

  • From his study of Latin at the high school in Newton, Massachusetts, he knew the word ablative, for it denoted a grammatical form much loved by Julius Caesar, a no-nonsense engineer himself.

    Space

  • I have before stated that he wrote a Latin Grammar for the use of his school, and instead of the word ablative, in general use, he compounded three or four Latin words [4] as explanatory of this case.

    The Life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1838

  • Participants at the meeting concluded that the government needed to regulate the use of the procedure, called ablative surgery.

    China Bans Irreversible Brain Procedure

  • But in mainstream medicine, the surgery performed on Mr. Mi -- called ablative surgery -- is a last resort for mental illness.

    In China, Brain Surgery

Comments

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  • 1906 US Railway Assn. Standard Cipher Code, shorthand for "subject to immediate acceptance".

    January 19, 2013