Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A kind of ancient pottery vase used for holding oils, and originally made from alabaster.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Ancient Greek ἀλάβαστρον

Examples

  • Imported Corinthian alabastron (unguent jar) was found in a late seventh-century B.C. tholos tomb at Casa Nocera. (left) [LARGERIMAGE] Bronze canteen with small pendants from Casa Nocera dates from the first half of the seventh century B.C. (right) [LARGERIMAGE]

    Dig Like a Surgeon

  • Looted in the 1950s, the tomb has yielded only a few ceramics: an imported Corinthian alabastron (unguent container), several Etrusco-Corinthian alabastra (local copies of Greek vessels), and fragments of pithoi, large storage jars used for the ashes of the deceased.

    Dig Like a Surgeon

  • Needle-sharp shards of the broken alabastron that once contained it lay in wait amongst the oil too.

    Two For The Lions

  • Either the grid or a shard of glass from the broken alabastron must have hurt her; she bit angrily at a claw, where blood streamed.

    Two For The Lions

  • Near the wall of a bathroom which was unearthed by the north-west side of the North Portico, there was found the lid of an Egyptian alabastron, bearing the cartouche of

    The Sea-Kings of Crete

  • The disastrous period of the Hyksos domination in Egypt has left but one trace at Knossos, but that is of peculiar interest, for it is the lid of an alabastron bearing the name of the Hyksos King

    The Sea-Kings of Crete

  • 'Ab-nub's child, Sebek-user, deceased,' whose statuette was found at Knossos, gives us a point of connection between the earlier part of Middle Minoan III. and the Thirteenth Egyptian Dynasty, while the alabastron of Khyan links the later portion of the period with the Hyksos domination in Egypt.

    The Sea-Kings of Crete

  • With that absence of form and ceremony which belongs to true friendship, he did not wait for me to order my grand-chamberlain and other chief officers of my retinue to receive him, but came straight to the room “of the alabastron,” so called from its alabaster columns, which was my reception-room, and in the window of which he had seen me from the street.

    The pillar of fire, or, Israel in bondage

  • By a side corridor, we reached a small court lined with alabastron, in which three priests were pacing up and down, reading and meditating.

    The pillar of fire, or, Israel in bondage

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