Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of altre.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I think its going to be a altred thing where you dont know what is real and what is fake since the crime is of the mind I think that is some what of what they are getting at from other things I have seen. muffin7

    Inception International Trailer | /Film

  • Very sildome times hee had a sight of his Mother, because shee alwayes kept company with Conradoes wife; and yet when they came within view of each other, shee knew not him, nor he her, so much yeres had altred them both from what they were wont to be, and when they saw each other last.

    The Decameron

  • But the case was very strangely altred, because she was now growne no more mindfull of him, then if she had never seene him before.

    The Decameron

  • Night being passed over, and Nathan risen, his heart altred not a jot from his counsel given to Mithridanes, much lesse changed from anie part thereof: but all alone by himselfe, walked on to the wood, the place appointed for his death.

    The Decameron

  • Truly (quoth Calandrino) well enough to mine owne thinking, yet notwithstanding, I met with Nello but even now; and he told me, that my countenance was very much altred; Is it possible that I should bee sicke, and feele no paine or distaste in any part of me?

    The Decameron

  • The Woman, who knew well enough the Messenger (notwithstanding all his formall disguise) made answer: That the party expected, came not: but if hee had come, it was to no purpose; because her minde was now otherwise altred, albeit she changed not a jote from her amorous conclusion.

    The Decameron

  • The vertuous and religious Lady alledged so many commendable examples, and used such plenty of moving perswasions, that she quite altred his minde from putting them to death, and hee commanded onely, that they should separately be imprisoned, with little store of food, and lodging of the uneasiest, untill he should otherwise determine of them; and so it was done.

    The Decameron

  • Perhaps the extraordinary greefe and melancholly suffered by me since the time of her losse, hath so altred my wonted complexion, that shee is not able to take knowledge of me.

    The Decameron

  • He determining to procure a very solemne assembly at Verona, and many people being met there from divers places, especially Gentlemen of all degrees; suddenly (upon what occasion I know not) his minde altred, and hee would not goe forward with his intention.

    The Decameron

  • Now that I have seene mine honour and honesties enemy laid along; mine anger is past, and Husband, I freely pardon you: intreating you heartily henceforward, not to presume or imagine, that my love eyther is, or can bee altred from you.

    The Decameron

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.