Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of arquebusade.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They had heard the arquebusades, and some of them hurried to the sound of the battle.

    Champlain's Dream

  • They had heard the arquebusades, and some of them hurried to the sound of the battle.

    Champlain's Dream

  • Those who were within the castle, being till then busy at the pillage, when they heard this noise ran to the towers and fortresses, from whence they shot at him above nine thousand and five-and-twenty falconshot and arquebusades, aiming all at his head, and so thick did they shoot at him that he cried out,

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Those who were within the castle, being till then busy at the pillage, when they heard this noise ran to the towers and fortresses, from whence they shot at him above nine thousand and five-and-twenty falconshot and arquebusades, aiming all at his head, and so thick did they shoot at him that he cried out,

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • “It would also be requisite not to entrust command,” Montaigne says, “to men who would fly from apples more than from arquebusades.”

    Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men

  • I was then something of a soldier, and I threw myself at Casal into the arquebusades, to show that I rode on horseback as well as an officer.

    The Vicomte De Bragelonne

  • "It would also be requisite not to entrust command," Montaigne says, "to men who would fly from apples more than from arquebusades."

    Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men

  • Those who were within the castle, being till then busy at the pillage, when they heard this noise ran to the towers and fortresses, from whence they shot at him above nine thousand and five-and-twenty falconshot and arquebusades, aiming all at his head, and so thick did they shoot at him that he cried out, Ponocrates, my friend, these flies here are like to put out mine eyes; give me a branch of those willow-trees to drive them away, thinking that the bullets and stones shot out of the great ordnance had been but dunflies.

    Gargantua and Pantagruel, Illustrated, Book 1

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