Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A site in the autonomic nervous system in which inhibitory responses occur when adrenergic agents, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine, are released. Activation of beta-receptors causes various physiological reactions, such as relaxation of the bronchial muscles and an increase in the rate and force of cardiac contraction. Also called beta-adrenergic receptor.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Overuse of the beta-agonists has well described as reason to down regulate the beta-receptor.

    CNN Transcript Jun 26, 2004

  • I saw that the success of the beta-receptor antagonist programme would suck me more and more into the role of giving the young propranolol technical support and promotion - just as I was itching to start a new programme.

    Sir James W. Black - Autobiography

  • Among the numerous people who were involved in bringing the first beta-receptor antagonist to the marketplace, three played crucial roles.

    Sir James W. Black - Autobiography

  • I was convinced that the histamine antagonists of the day were analogous to the alpha-receptor antagonists and that the equivalent of a beta-receptor antagonist was needed to block, for example, histamine-stimulated acid secretion.

    Sir James W. Black - Autobiography

  • Black's ideas were correct, and beta-receptor blocking drugs have subsequently been widely used in the treatment of angina pectoris and conditions with tachycardia and tachyarrythmia.

    Physiology or Medicine 1988 - Press Release

  • H2-antagonists discovered by Black selectively inhibit gastric secretion, while beta-receptor antagonists inhibit cardiac and pulmonary actions of epinephrine and norepinephrine.

    Physiology or Medicine 1988 - Press Release

  • Ahlqvist's receptor theory stimulated Black and coworkers to develop substances with beta-receptor blocking properties in

    Physiology or Medicine 1988 - Press Release

  • Black was the first to realize that the development of a clinically useful beta-receptor blocking drug might introduce a new pharmacotherapeutic principle in the treatment of coronary heart disease (angina pectoris).

    Physiology or Medicine 1988 - Press Release

  • Using the isoprenaline molecule as a basis Black and coworkers succeeded in developing the first clinically useful beta-receptor antagonists pronethalol (1962) and propranolol (1964).

    Physiology or Medicine 1988 - Press Release

  • A beta-receptor blocking compound had been developed by other researchers in 1958, but it was only suitable for experimental studies in animals.

    Physiology or Medicine 1988 - Press Release

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