Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To say in a loud voice; announce: called my name from across the street; calling out numbers.
  • transitive v. To demand or ask for the presence of: called the children to dinner; call the police.
  • transitive v. To demand or ask for a meeting of; convene or convoke: call the legislature into session.
  • transitive v. To order or request to undertake a particular activity or work; summon: She was called for jury duty. He was called to the priesthood.
  • transitive v. To give the command for; order: call a work stoppage.
  • transitive v. To communicate or try to communicate with by telephone: called me at nine.
  • transitive v. To dial (a telephone number): call 911 for help.
  • transitive v. To lure (prey) by imitating the characteristic cry of an animal: call ducks.
  • transitive v. To cause to come to the mind or to attention: a story that calls to mind an incident in my youth.
  • transitive v. To name: What will you call the baby?
  • transitive v. To consider or regard as being of a particular type or kind; characterize: Let's call the game a draw. I'd hardly call him a good manager.
  • transitive v. To designate; label: Nobody calls me a liar.
  • transitive v. To demand payment of: call a loan.
  • transitive v. To require the presentation of (a bond) for redemption before maturity.
  • transitive v. To force the sale of (a stock or commodity) by exercising a call option.
  • transitive v. Sports To stop or postpone (a game) because of bad weather, darkness, or other adverse conditions.
  • transitive v. Sports To declare in the capacity of an umpire or referee: call a runner out; call a penalty for holding.
  • transitive v. Sports To indicate a decision in regard to: calling balls and strikes; called a close play at home plate.
  • transitive v. Sports To give the orders or signals for: a quarterback who called a poor play.
  • transitive v. Games To describe the intended outcome of (one's billiard shot) before playing.
  • transitive v. Games To equal the bet of (the preceding bet or bettor) in a poker game.
  • transitive v. To indicate or characterize accurately in advance; predict: It is often difficult to call the outcome of an election. See Synonyms at predict.
  • transitive v. To challenge the truthfulness or genuineness of: called the debater on a question of fact.
  • transitive v. To shout directions in rhythm for (a square dance).
  • intransitive v. To speak loudly; shout: a swimmer who was calling for help.
  • intransitive v. To utter a characteristic cry. Used of an animal: geese calling in early morning.
  • intransitive v. To communicate or try to communicate with someone by telephone: I called twice, but no one answered.
  • intransitive v. To pay a short visit: We called to pay our respects. He called on the neighbors but they weren't home.
  • n. A loud cry; a shout.
  • n. The characteristic cry of an animal.
  • n. A sound or an instrument made to imitate such a cry, used as a lure: a moose call.
  • n. A telephone communication or connection.
  • n. Need or occasion: There was no call for an apology.
  • n. Demand: There isn't much call for buggy whips today.
  • n. A claim on a person's time or life: the call of duty.
  • n. A short visit, especially one made as a formality or for business or professional purposes.
  • n. A summons or invitation.
  • n. A signal, such as that made by a horn or bell.
  • n. The sounding of a horn to encourage hounds during a hunt.
  • n. A strong inner urge or prompting; a vocation: a call to the priesthood.
  • n. The strong attraction or appeal of a given activity or environment: the call of the wild; answered the call of the desert.
  • n. A roll call.
  • n. A notice of rehearsal times posted in a theater.
  • n. Sports A decision made by an umpire or referee.
  • n. Sports An announced description of a game or race, as by a sportscaster.
  • n. A direction or series of directions rhythmically called out to square dancers.
  • n. A demand for payment of a debt.
  • n. A demand to submit bonds to the issuer for redemption before the maturity date.
  • n. An option to buy a certain quantity of a stock or commodity for a specified price within a specified time.
  • n. A demand for payment due on stock bought on margin when the value has shrunk.
  • call back To communicate the need for (someone) to return from one situation or location to a previous one: Management called the laid-off workers back.
  • call back To telephone or radio (a person) who has called previously: I called her back at noon.
  • call back To recall (a defective product) for repair: The company has called back all such models built in 1990.
  • call down To find fault with; reprimand: The teacher called me down for disobedience.
  • call down To invoke, as from heaven.
  • call for To appear, as on someone else's premises, in order to get: My chauffeur will call for you at seven.
  • call for To be an appropriate occasion for: This news calls for champagne.
  • call for To require; demand: work that calls for patience.
  • call forth To evoke; elicit: a love song that calls forth sad memories.
  • call in To take out of circulation: calling in silver dollars.
  • call in To summon for assistance or consultation: call in a specialist.
  • call in To communicate with another by telephone: Has the boss called in today?
  • call off To cancel or postpone: call off a trip; called the trip off.
  • call off To restrain or recall: Call off your dogs.
  • call on To order or request to undertake a particular activity: called on our friends to help.
  • call out To cause to assemble; summon: call out the guard.
  • call out To challenge to a duel.
  • call up To summon to active military service: called up reserve troops for active duty.
  • call up To cause one to remember; bring to mind: stories that call up old times.
  • call up To bring forth for action or discussion; raise.
  • call upon To order; require: I call upon you to tell the truth.
  • call upon To make a demand or a series of demands on: Social institutions are now being called upon to provide assistance to the homeless.
  • idiom call a spade a spade To speak directly, precisely, and forthrightly.
  • idiom in To raise doubts about.
  • idiom call it a day Informal To stop what one has been doing, for the remainder of the day or at least for the present.
  • idiom call it a night Informal To stop what one has been doing, for the remainder of the night.
  • idiom call it quits Informal To stop working or trying; quit.
  • idiom call names To speak to or about another in offensive terms.
  • idiom call of nature A need to urinate or defecate. Often used with answer: He left the room to answer the call of nature.
  • idiom call (someone's) bluff To challenge another with a display of strength or confidence.
  • idiom shots Informal To exercise authority; be in charge.
  • idiom on call Available when summoned for service or use: physicians who were on call for 48 hours.
  • idiom on call Subject to payment on demand.
  • idiom within call Close enough to come if summoned: The nurse is within call if you need him.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A telephone conversation.
  • n. A social visit.
  • n. A cry or shout.
  • n. A decision or judgement.
  • n. The characteristic cry of a bird or other animal.
  • n. A beckoning or summoning.
  • n. An option to buy stock at a specified price during or at a specified time.
  • n. The act of calling to the other batsman.
  • n. The state of being the batsman whose role it is to call (depends on where the ball goes.)
  • n. A work shift which requires one to be available when requested (see on call).
  • n. The act of jumping to a subprogram, saving the means to return to the point.
  • n. A statement of a particular state, or rule, made in many games such as bridge, craps, jacks, and so on.
  • n. The act of matching a bet made by a player who has previously bet in the same round of betting.
  • v. To request, summon, or beckon.
  • v. To cry or shout.
  • v. To contact by telephone.
  • v. To pay a (social) visit.
  • v. To stop at a station or port.
  • v. To name or refer to.
  • v. (of a batsman): To shout directions to the other batsman on whether or not they should take a run.
  • v. (of a fielder): To shout to other fielders that he intends to take a catch (thus avoiding collisions.)
  • v. To match or equal the amount of poker chips in the pot as the player that bet.
  • v. To require, demand.
  • v. To state, or invoke a rule, in many games such as bridge, craps, jacks, and so on.
  • v. To announce the early extinction of a debt by prepayment, usually at a premium.
  • v. To demand repayment of a loan.
  • v. To predict.
  • v. To declare in advance.
  • v. To jump to (another part of a program) to perform some operation, returning to the original point on completion.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To command or request to come or be present; to summon.
  • transitive v. To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; -- often used of a divine summons; ; sometimes, to invite.
  • transitive v. To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; ; to appoint and summon.
  • transitive v. To give name to; to name; to address, or speak of, by a specifed name.
  • transitive v. To regard or characterize as of a certain kind; to denominate; to designate.
  • transitive v. To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact.
  • transitive v. To show or disclose the class, character, or nationality of.
  • transitive v. To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off.
  • transitive v. To invoke; to appeal to.
  • transitive v. To rouse from sleep; to awaken.
  • intransitive v. To speak in loud voice; to cry out; to address by name; -- sometimes with to.
  • intransitive v. To make a demand, requirement, or request.
  • intransitive v. To make a brief visit; also, to stop at some place designated, as for orders.
  • n. The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation.
  • n. A signal, as on a drum, bugle, trumpet, or pipe, to summon soldiers or sailors to duty.
  • n. An invitation to take charge of or serve a church as its pastor.
  • n. A requirement or appeal arising from the circumstances of the case; a moral requirement or appeal.
  • n. A divine vocation or summons.
  • n. Vocation; employment.
  • n. A short visit; ; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders.
  • n. A note blown on the horn to encourage the hounds.
  • n. A whistle or pipe, used by the boatswain and his mate, to summon the sailors to duty.
  • n. The cry of a bird; also a noise or cry in imitation of a bird; or a pipe to call birds by imitating their note or cry.
  • n. A reference to, or statement of, an object, course, distance, or other matter of description in a survey or grant requiring or calling for a corresponding object, etc., on the land.
  • n. The privilege to demand the delivery of stock, grain, or any commodity, at a fixed, price, at or within a certain time agreed on.
  • n. See Assessment, 4.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To utter in a loud voice; read over in a loud tone; hence, to pronounce or announce.
  • To attract or demand the attention of (a person or an animal), or arouse, as from sleep, by loudly uttering his (its) name, or some other word or exclamation.
  • To invite or command to come; summon to one's presence; send for: as, to call a messenger; to call a cab.
  • To convoke; assemble; issue a summons for the assembling of: as, to call a meeting: often with together: as, the king called his council together.
  • To name; apply to by way of name or designation.
  • To designate or characterize as; state or affirm to be; reckon; consider.
  • To indicate or point out as being; manifest, reckon, or suppose to be.
  • To select, as for an office, a duty, or an employment; appoint: as, “Paul, … called to be an apostle,” Rom. i. 1.
  • To invoke or appeal to.
  • In shooting, to lure, as wild birds, within range by imitating their notes.
  • To summon into service: as, to call out the militia.
  • To elicit; bring into play; evoke.
  • To bring into action or discussion: as, to call up a bill before a legislative body.
  • To require payment of: as, to call up the sums still due on shares. Synonyms and Call, Invite, Bid, Convoke, Summon, assemble, convene. Call is generic, and applicable to summonses of all kinds. Invite is more formal, and in compliance with the requirements of courteous ceremony; bid in this sense is obsolete or poetic. Convoke, literally to call together, implies authority in the agent and an organization which is called into session or assembly: as, to convoke the Houses of Parliament. Summon implies authority in the summoner and usually formality in the method.
  • and To designate, entitle, term, style.
  • To make a sound designed (or as if designed) to attract attention; demand heed to one's wish, entreaty, etc.; shout; cry.
  • To make a short stop or visit: followed by at, for, or on or upon: as, to call at a house or place, for a person or thing, or upon a person. (See phrases below.)
  • In poker, to demand that the hands be shown.
  • To make a stop or brief visit for the procurement of, as a thing, or the company of a person to another place.
  • To pray to or worship; invoke: as, to call on the name of the Lord.
  • To make a short visit to, as a person or a family, usually for a special purpose.
  • n. A loud cry; a shout.
  • n. An invocation or prayer.
  • n. Demand; requisition; claim, public or private: as, the calls of justice or humanity; to have many calls upon one's time.
  • n. Vocation; employment; calling.
  • n. Specifically A divine vocation or summons: as, the call of Abraham.
  • n. A summons or notice to assemble; a notice requiring attention or attendance: as, the president issued a call for a meeting to be held next week.
  • n. A specific invitation or request, as of a public body or society; particularly, the invitation presented by a congregation (or on their behalf) to a clergyman to become their pastor, or the document containing such an invitation.
  • n. An invitation or request (usually expressed by applause) to an actor to reappear on the scene, or to come before the curtain, to receive the acknowledgments of the audience.
  • n. Milit., a summons by bugle, pipe, or drum, for the soldiers to perform any duty: as, a bugle-call.
  • n. Nautical, a peculiar silver whistle or pipe used by the boatswain and his mates, whose special badge it is.
  • n. The cry or note of a bird.
  • n. In hunting: A note blown on the horn to encourage the hounds.
  • n. A pipe or whistle for imitating the notes of wild birds and thus luring them within range of the gun.
  • n. An assessment on the stockholders of a corporation or joint-stock company, or members of a mutual insurance company, usually for payment of instalments of their unpaid subscriptions, or for their promised contributions to pay losses.
  • n. A request that holders of bonds which have been drawn for redemption by a government or corporation will present them and receive payment of the principal sums mentioned in them, and whatever interest may then be due, no further interest being payable after the date named.
  • n. In the stock exchange, the privilege (secured by contract and for a consideration) of claiming or demanding and receiving a certain number of shares of some particular stock, at a specified price and within a stated period, or
  • n. the difference of value at the time of making the demand over that specified in the contract, if the price has risen; hence, the document it self.
  • n. Authority; command.
  • n. Occasion; cause; business; necessity: as, you had no call to be there.
  • n. A short visit: as, to make a call; to pay one a call.
  • n. In poker, a demand for a show-down; the show-down itself.
  • n. A brood of wild ducks.
  • n. An obsolete spelling of caul.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. send a message or attempt to reach someone by radio, phone, etc.; make a signal to in order to transmit a message
  • v. challenge (somebody) to make good on a statement; charge with or censure for an offense
  • n. a visit in an official or professional capacity
  • n. a telephone connection
  • v. get or try to get into communication (with someone) by telephone
  • n. a demand especially in the phrase
  • n. a request
  • v. order, request, or command to come
  • v. challenge the sincerity or truthfulness of
  • n. (sports) the decision made by an umpire or referee
  • v. give the calls (to the dancers) for a square dance
  • v. lure by imitating the characteristic call of an animal
  • v. rouse somebody from sleep with a call
  • v. utter a characteristic note or cry
  • n. an instruction that interrupts the program being executed
  • v. assign a specified (usually proper) proper name to
  • n. a special disposition (as if from a divine source) to pursue a particular course

Etymologies

Middle English callen, probably from Old Norse kalla; see gal- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English callen, from Old English ceallian ("to call, shout") and Old Norse kalla ("to call, shout"); both from Proto-Germanic *kalzōnan (“to call, shout”), from Proto-Indo-European *gal(o)s-, *glōs-, *golH-so- (“voice, cry”). Cognate with Scots call, caw, ca ("to call, cry, shout"), Dutch kallen ("to chat, talk"), German kallen ("to scream, talk loudly, talk too much"), Swedish kalla ("to call, refer to, beckon"), Norwegian kalle ("to call, name"), Icelandic kalla ("to call, shout, name"), Latin glōria ("fame, honour, glory"), Welsh galw ("to call, demand"), Polish głos ("voice"), Lithuanian gal̃sas ("echo"). More at glory. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • recitation, prayer

    July 22, 2009