Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of callant.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Did the latter draw nigh in any considerable force, messengers were forthwith despatched to the "Auld Toon," especially to the filthy alleys and closes of the High Street, which forthwith would disgorge swarms of bare-headed and bare-footed "callants," who, with gestures wild and

    Lavengro The Scholar - The Gypsy - The Priest, Vol. 1 (of 2)

  • Did the latter draw nigh in any considerable force, messengers were forthwith despatched to the "auld toon," especially to the filthy alleys and closes of the High Street, which forthwith would disgorge swarms of bare-headed and bare-footed "callants," who, with gestures wild and

    Lavengro The Scholar, the Gypsy, the Priest

  • Ye are ane of the folk that gang about yonder setting folk by the lugs, as callants set their collies to fight.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • Isna that kind of fray aye about honour? and what for should the honour of a substantial, four-nooked, sclated house of three stories, no be foughten for, as weel as the credit of ony of these feckless callants that make such a fray about their reputation? —

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • “They were daft callants,” she said, “and that was all — when the drink was in, the wit was out — ye could not put an auld head upon young shouthers — a young cowt will canter, be it up-hill or down — and what for no?” was her uniform conclusion.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • “Now, callants, draw in within the courtyard — they are too many to mell with in the open field.”

    Quentin Durward

  • All old bonds were snapped in a moment; emigration (at first opposed by some of the chiefs) and the French wars depleted the country of its “lang-leggit callants, gaun wanting the breeks.”

    Rob Roy

  • The bicker had long since commenced, stones from sling and hand were flying; but the callants of the New Town were now carrying everything before them.

    Lavengro

  • Did the latter draw nigh in any considerable force, messengers were forthwith despatched to the ‘Auld Toon,’ especially to the filthy alleys and closes of the High Street, which forthwith would disgorge swarms of bare-headed and bare-footed ‘callants,’ who, with gestures wild and

    Lavengro

  • "Elfinland Wud," which is enough to frighten, not a nursery of children, but a score of bearded callants out of their wits, if they heard it chanted, on an eerie night, in the dim forests of Glenmore.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 379, May, 1847

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