Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Behaved; mannered. See carriage, 9.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He also gave testimony of his discovery of "curious containers of various ointments" suspected to have been associated with Ann's alleged witchcraft at her house at the time of her arrest, and asserted that she was an "ill-carriaged woman," whom he was convinced had adversely affected his wife during her service as midwife.

    History of American Women

  • Some very disagreeable allegations were made against these Connecticut wives -- that they were rude, gay, light-carriaged girls, poor and lazy housewives, ill cooks, fond of dancing, and talking balderdash talk, and far from being loving consorts.

    Customs and Fashions in Old New England

  • When I heard her dismiss the footman, I stepped up to him and asked him, what little lady that was? and held a little chat with him about what a pretty child it was with her, and how genteel and well-carriaged the lady, the eldest, would be: how womanish, and how grave; and the fool of a fellow told me presently who she was; that she was Sir Thomas

    The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders

  • I think her a little too good for my family, and so well carriaged as I hardly ever saw.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1667 N.S.

  • Indeed I think her a little too good for my family, and so well carriaged as I hardly ever saw.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 57: September 1667

  • J. Robinson, would needs have me by coach home with him, and sending word home to my house I did go and dine with him, his ordinary table being very good, and his lady a very high-carriaged but comely big woman; I was mightily pleased with her.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 26: January/February 1663-64

  • Lieutenant of the Tower, Sir J. Robinson, would needs have me by coach home with him, and sending word home to my house I did go and dine with him, his ordinary table being very good, and his lady a very high-carriaged but comely big woman; I was mightily pleased with her.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1664 N.S.

  • We had a venison pasty, and other good plain and handsome dishes; the mistress of the house a pretty, well-carriaged woman, and a fine hand she hath; and her maid a pretty brown lass.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

  • The Lieutenant of the Tower, Sir J. Robinson, would needs have me by coach home with him, and sending word home to my house I did go and dine with him, his ordinary table being very good, and his lady a very high-carriaged but comely big woman; I was mightily pleased with her.

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Jan/Feb 1663/64

  • But how can one be certain that, as Burchfield writes, well-carriaged is a euphemism for having large breasts, let him do just what he pleased for succumb to a seducer, and so on?

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XII No 3

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