Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of cathole.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of two small holes astern, above the gunroom ports, through which hawsers may be passed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Nautical, one of two small holes astern above the gun-room ports, for the passage of a hawser or cable in heaving astern.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When you dig your cat-hole, ideally at least a stone's throw from water, do not dig it too deep (it won't decompose) or too shallow (for obvious reasons).

    Picking urban blueberries

  • You can come up to the house and use it, or just cat-hole in those trees east of here, he said, turning for the door.

    Shift

  • The “cat-hole” was a square opening, about seven by eight inches, provided for the purpose of letting the cat pass in and out of the house at will during the night.

    A Slave Among Slaves

  • In addition to these openings there was, in the lower right-hand corner of the room, the “cat-hole, ”—a contrivance which almost every mansion or cabin in Virginia possessed during the ante-bellum period.

    A Slave Among Slaves

  • The "cat-hole" was a square opening, about seven by eight inches, provided for the purpose of letting the cat pass in and out of the house at will during the night.

    Up From Slavery: An Autobiography

  • In addition to these openings there was, in the lower right-hand corner of the room, the "cat-hole," -- a contrivance which almost every mansion or cabin in Virginia possessed during the ante-bellum period.

    Up From Slavery: An Autobiography

  • As he rose, Tricksey-Wee and Buffy-Bob came out of the hole in the tree-root, and through the cat-hole in the door, and walked boldly towards the giant.

    The Light Princess and Other Fairy Stories

  • The next idea naturally rising was the burn; he tumbled down over the straw heap to the floor of the barn, and made for the cat-hole.

    Sir Gibbie

  • Like a fox into his hole, the child would creep into the corner where God had stored sleep for him: back he went to the barn, gently trotting, and wormed himself through the cat-hole.

    Sir Gibbie

  • He bolted through the cat-hole -- but again just one moment too late, leaving behind him on Fergus's retina the light from the soles of two bare feet.

    Sir Gibbie

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