Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To correspond in form or character; be similar.
  • intransitive v. To act or be in accord or agreement; comply: a computer that conforms to the manufacturer's advertising claims. See Synonyms at agree.
  • intransitive v. To act in accordance with current customs or modes. See Synonyms at adapt.
  • transitive v. To bring into agreement or correspondence; make similar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To act in accordance with expectations; to behave in the manner of others, especially as a result of social pressure.
  • v. To be in accordance with a set of specifications or regulations, or with a policy or guideline.
  • v. To make similar in form or nature; to make suitable for a purpose; to adapt.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of the same form; similar in import; conformable.
  • transitive v. To shape in accordance with; to make like; to bring into harmony or agreement with; -- usually with to or unto.
  • intransitive v. To be in accord or harmony; to comply; to be obedient; to submit; -- with to or with.
  • intransitive v. To comply with the usages of the Established Church; to be a conformist.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Conformable.
  • To make of the same form or character; make like; adjust: with to: as, to conform anything to a model or a standard.
  • To bring into harmony or correspondence; make agreeable; adapt; submit: often with a reflexive pronoun.
  • To act conformably, compliantly, or in accordance: with to: as, to conform to the fashion or to custom.
  • In English history, to comply with the usages of the Established Church: in this sense often used absolutely. See conformity, 3.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. be similar, be in line with
  • v. adapt or conform oneself to new or different conditions

Etymologies

Middle English conformen, from Old French conformer, from Latin cōnfōrmāre, to shape after : com-, com- + fōrmāre, to shape (from fōrma, shape).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English conformen, from Old French conformer, from Latin conformāre ("to mould, to shape after") (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Reader, you must know that an interesting fate (sometimes involving rats, sometimes not) awaits almost everyone, mouse or man, who does not conform.
    -The Tale Of Despereaux, Kate DiCamillo

    August 4, 2009

  • She has always been a conformist.

    April 14, 2007