Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A large number of persons gathered together; a throng.
  • n. The common people; the populace.
  • n. A group of people united by a common characteristic, as age, interest, or vocation: the over-30 crowd.
  • n. A group of people attending a public function; an audience: The play drew a small but appreciative crowd.
  • n. A large number of things positioned or considered together.
  • intransitive v. To congregate in a restricted area; throng: The children crowded around the TV.
  • intransitive v. To advance by pressing or shoving: A bevy of reporters crowded toward the candidate.
  • transitive v. To force by or as if by pressing or shoving: Police crowded the spectators back to the viewing stand. Urban sprawl crowded the farmers out of the valley.
  • transitive v. To draw or stand near to: The batter crowded the plate.
  • transitive v. To press, cram, or force tightly together: crowded the clothes into the closet.
  • transitive v. To fill or occupy to overflowing: Books crowded the shelves.
  • transitive v. Informal To put pressure on, as to pay a debt.
  • idiom crowd (on) sail Nautical To spread a large amount of sail to increase speed.
  • n. An ancient Celtic stringed instrument that was bowed or plucked. Also called crwth.
  • n. Chiefly British A fiddle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To push, to press, to shove.
  • v. To press or drive together; to mass together.
  • v. To fill by pressing or thronging together; hence, to encumber by excess of numbers or quantity.
  • v. To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably.
  • v. To approach another ship too closely when it has right of way
  • v. To press together or collect in numbers; to swarm; to throng
  • v. To urge or press forward; to force one's self; as, a man crowds into a room
  • v. (of a square-rigged ship) (transitive) To carry excessive sail
  • n. A group of people congregated or collected into a close body without order.
  • n. Several things collected or closely pressed together; also, some things adjacent to each other.
  • n. The so-called lower orders of people; the populace, vulgar.
  • n. A group of people united or at least characterised by a common interest.
  • n. A crwth, an Ancient Celtic plucked string instrument.
  • n. A fiddle.
  • v. To play on a crowd; to fiddle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A number of things collected or closely pressed together; also, a number of things adjacent to each other.
  • n. A number of persons congregated or collected into a close body without order; a throng.
  • n. The lower orders of people; the populace; the vulgar; the rabble; the mob.
  • n. An ancient instrument of music with six strings; a kind of violin, being the oldest known stringed instrument played with a bow.
  • intransitive v. To press together or collect in numbers; to swarm; to throng.
  • intransitive v. To urge or press forward; to force one's self.
  • transitive v. To push, to press, to shove.
  • transitive v. To press or drive together; to mass together.
  • transitive v. To fill by pressing or thronging together; hence, to encumber by excess of numbers or quantity.
  • transitive v. To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably.
  • transitive v. To play on a crowd; to fiddle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To push; force forward; shove; impel.
  • To push or wheel in a wheelbarrow.
  • To press close, or closely together; push or drive in; squeeze; cram: as, to crowd too much freight into a ship; to crowd many people into a small room.
  • To fill to excess; occupy or pack with an unusual or inordinate number or quantity: as, the audience crowded the theater; to crowd a ship's hold.
  • To throng about; press upon; press as by a multitude: as, we were most uncomfortably crowded.
  • To encumber or annoy by multitudes or excess of numbers.
  • To urge; press by solicitation; importune; annoy by urging: as, to crowd a debtor for immediate payment.
  • To press in numbers; come together closely; swarm: as, the multitude crowded through the gate or into the room.
  • To press forward; increase speed; advance pushingly, as against obstacles: as, to crowd into a full room, or into company.
  • To play on a crowd or fiddle.
  • n. A collection; a multitude; a large number of things collected or grouped together; a number of things lying near one another.
  • n. A large number of persons congregated together, or gathered into a close body without order; a throng.
  • n. Any group or company of persons: as, a jolly crowd.
  • n. People in general; the populace; the mass; the mob.
  • n. Same as crode.
  • n. Synonyms and Throng, etc. (see multitude), host, swarm, concourse, shoal.
  • n. An ancient Welsh and Irish musical instrument, the earliest known specimen of the viol class—that is, of stringed instruments played with a bow.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an informal body of friends
  • v. fill or occupy to the point of overflowing
  • v. approach a certain age or speed
  • v. cause to herd, drive, or crowd together
  • n. a large number of things or people considered together
  • v. to gather together in large numbers

Etymologies

From Middle English crowden, to crowd, press, from Old English crūdan, to hasten, press.
Middle English croud, from Middle Welsh crwth.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English crūdan. Cognate with Dutch kruien. (Wiktionary)
Celtic, from Welsh crwth. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • A fiddle. --old British provincial term from Exmoor. Cf. crowth.

    May 5, 2011