Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The place to which one is going or directed.
  • n. The ultimate purpose for which something is created or intended.
  • n. Archaic An act of appointing or setting aside for a specific purpose.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of destining or appointing.
  • n. Purpose for which anything is destined; predetermined end, object, or use; ultimate design.
  • n. The place set for the end of a journey, or to which something is sent; place or point aimed at.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of destining or appointing.
  • n. Purpose for which anything is destined; predetermined end, object, or use; ultimate design.
  • n. The place set for the end of a journey, or to which something is sent; place or point aimed at.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of destining or appointing; appointment; designation.
  • n. The purpose for which anything is intended or appointed; end or ultimate design; predetermined object or use: as, every animal is fitted for its destination.
  • n. The place to which a thing is appointed or directed; the predetermined end of a journey, voyage, or course of transmission; goal: as, the ship's destination was unknown; the destination of a letter or package.
  • n. In Scots law, a term, generally speaking, applied to the series of heirs called to the succession of heritable or movable property, by the provision of the law or title, or by the will of the proprietor: but usually applied in a more limited sense to a nomination of successors in a certain order, regulated by the will of the proprietor.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the place designated as the end (as of a race or journey)
  • n. written directions for finding some location; written on letters or packages that are to be delivered to that location
  • n. the ultimate goal for which something is done

Etymologies

From Latin dēstinātiōnem, from dēstināre ("to destine"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • It gives new meaning to the term "destination winery."

    Mary Orlin: Wine Country's Sexy New Winery

  • The phrase "destination restaurant" usually conjures up visions of white tablecloths and fine china, but pilgrimage-worthy food doesn't always come from a cosmopolitan kitchen.

    You Want to Eat Where?

  • Grossinger's, the resort many considered the gem of the Borscht Belt and the premier mountain destination, is now abandoned, moss and plants growing through carpets, over pools, and around doorways that were once teeming with children.

    Annemarie Dooling: Mountain Resorts of the Past Earning a Second Life

  • A heady mix of shopping, eating and entertainment options has turned malls across the US into similar tourism magnets and coined the phrase "destination malls."

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • No reason to go there unless my destination is the central library, historical society or a land use hearing (and those really aren't worth going to since I already know the way a majority of them will be decided).

    Fine with them (Jack Bog's Blog)

  • Also: if your destination is a B&B or other hotel at Lake Chapala, ask that they email directions to you in Spanish, so you can print the directions and just hand them to your taxi driver.

    Safe Travel From Airport

  • About halfway out of Zamora toward your destination is the fairly good-sized town of Zacapu which is the center of the Purhépecha nowadays.

    Road Trip From Mazamitla to Patzcuaro

  • The MTA envisions big retailers taking space, along with a "grand bar" overlooking the Manhattan skyline and what it calls "destination" restaurants, similar to the Campbell Apartment in Grand Central.

    Retail Destination for Fulton Street Hub

  • The argument for lunar versus Mars as a destination is the wrong argument.

    Why Some Say the Moon? - NASA Watch

  • It doesn't matter if the destination is the Moon (sorties or outpost), Mars and its moons, asteroids, or L1 satellites ... if the transportation system is too expensive to develop and operate, it will be a feeble effort at best.

    Moon Outpost or Bust - NASA Watch

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