Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Nautical A large medieval sailing galley.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of dromon.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • In the Middle Ages, a large, fast-sailing galley, or cutter; a large, swift war vessel.

Etymologies

Middle English, from Anglo-Norman dromund, from Late Latin dromō, dromōn-, a kind of ship, from Late Greek dromōn, from Greek dromos, race.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The two queens (if I may call them so, of whom one had been and one hoped to be of that estate), Joan and Berengère, went in a great ship which they call a dromond, a heavy-timbered ship carrying a crowd of sail.

    The Life and Death of Richard Yea-and-Nay

  • Craft danced on its blueness, everything from bumboats shaped like basins to a freighter under sail and a naval dromond with oars in parade-ground step.

    The Boat of a Million Years

  • And Foam Dancer is a small ship, not a dromond loaded to the gunnels with ivory and spices.

    Conan The Unconquered

  • The roundship, dromond, or cargo boat, was often little more than two beams long, and therefore far too slow to compete with ships of the galley type.

    On the Spanish Main Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien.

  • In the reign of Henry VIII. the shipwrights of this country began to build ships which combined something of the strength, and capacity of the dromond, with the length and fineness of the galley.

    On the Spanish Main Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien.

  • The dromond, in war-time, was sometimes converted into a warship, by the addition of fighting-castles fore and aft.

    On the Spanish Main Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien.

  • Venetian dromond was to other merchant-ships as the dromedary to other camels.

    Masters of the Guild

  • Look you, my son --- this Crusade, as you call your wild enterprise, is like a large dromond parting

    The Talisman

  • Look you, my son — this Crusade, as you call your wild enterprise, is like a large dromond [The largest sort of vessels then known were termed dromond’s, or dromedaries.] parting asunder in the waves.

    The Talisman

  • Lackaday, go home, let Maudie tie a warm nightcap on thy head, get thee a warm breakfast and a cup of distilled waters, and thou wilt be in ease tomorrow to fight thy wooden dromond, or soldan, as thou call’st him, the only thing thou wilt ever lay downright blow upon.”

    The Fair Maid of Perth

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