Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A genus of South American characinoid fishes, as E. unitæniatus, giving name to the subfamily Erythrininæ.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • No male of the so-called erythrinus has ever yet been seen, but females, and specimens full of roe, have been seen.

    On the Generation of Animals

  • Abundant species recorded during May to June include crested black tit Parus melanolophus, yellow-bellied fantail flycatcher Rhipidura hypoxantha, orange-flanked bush robin Erithacus cyanurus, bluefronted redstart Phoenicurus frontalis, Indian tree pipit Anthus hodgsoni, vinaceous breasted pipit A. roseatus, common rosefinch Carpodacus erythrinus, and nutcracker Nucifraga caryocatactes.

    Nanda Devi and Valley of Flowers National Park, India

  • The following are deep-sea fishes — the trygon, the cartilaginous fishes, the white conger, the serranus, the erythrinus, and the glaucus.

    The History of Animals

  • Fishes for the most part are divided into males and females, but one is puzzled to account for the erythrinus and the channa, for specimens of these species are never caught except in a condition of pregnancy.

    The History of Animals

  • Again, just as in testaceans and in plants there is what bears and engenders, but not what impregnates, so is it, among fishes, with the psetta, the erythrinus, and the channe; for these fish are in all cases found furnished with eggs.

    The History of Animals

  • That bees should generate without copulation is a thing which may be paralleled in other animals, but that what they generate should not be of the same kind is peculiar to them, for the erythrinus generates an erythrinus and the channa a channa.

    On the Generation of Animals

  • But, as it is, some of them have organs for milt and others have a uterus, and this distinction obtains in all except two, the erythrinus and the channa, some of them having the milt organs, others a uterus.

    On the Generation of Animals

  • The taranetzi char differs from the subspecies erythrinus in their lower number of gill rakers, which average 23 to 25 in taranetzi and 25 to 30 in erythrinus.

    Trout and Salmon of North America

  • In addition, the gill rakers of taranetzi char tend to be shorter, thicker, and more blunt compared to the long, fine, acute gill rakers of erythrinus.

    Trout and Salmon of North America

  • In the Chukchi Peninsula, in Russia, anadromous populations of taranetzi char have a life history similar to that of S. a. erythrinus.

    Trout and Salmon of North America

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