Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A post or messenger who travels on foot.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then, eating a little breakfast, he crossed the meadows in the direction of Casterbridge, bearing his letter in his pocket, that he might post it at the town office, and obviate the loss of one day in its transmission that would have resulted had he left it for the foot-post through the village.

    Under the Greenwood Tree

  • Here he heard a quick, familiar footstep in the path ahead of him, and, turning the corner of the bushes, confronted the foot-post on his way to Welland.

    Two on a Tower

  • Reaching the opposite side of the park there appeared before her for the third time that little old man, the foot-post.

    The Romantic Adventures of a Milkmaid

  • That the showers may not find me unprepared, I pack with my hamaca an extra length of rope, to be stretched taut from foot-post to head-post, that

    Edge of the Jungle

  • “Two hundred pounds of powder” were ordered from the next town by foot-post, and a cannon that had stood half buried a hundred years, serving for a hitching-post, was dug up and put into commission.

    The Meeting on the Long Bridge

  • “Two hundred pounds of powder” were ordered from the next town by foot-post, and a cannon that had stood half buried a hundred years, serving for a hitching-post, was dug up and put into commission.

    The Making of an American

  • Casterbridge, bearing his letter in his pocket, that he might post it at the town office, and obviate the loss of one day in its transmission that would have resulted had he left it for the foot-post through the village.

    Under the Greenwood Tree, or, the Mellstock quire; a rural painting of the Dutch school

  • Letters received at 6. 3O A.M. by foot-post from Anglebury. '

    Desperate Remedies

  • "Two hundred pounds of powder" were ordered from the next town by foot-post, and a cannon that had stood half buried a hundred years, serving for a hitching-post, was dug up and put into commission.

    The Making of an American

  • As late certainly as 1730 the mail was carried from New York to Albany in the winter by a "foot-post."

    Home Life in Colonial Days

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