Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of gourmandise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • On the whole the language is easy, and suitable for young children, but just occasionally a word slips in such as "gourmandising", which would need explaining to a child.

    Featherland How the Birds lived at Greenlawn

  • A man had administered a severe whipping to the slave in attendance on him, and when Socrates asked: “Why he was so wroth with his own serving-man?” excused himself on the ground that “the fellow was a lazy, gourmandising, good-for-nothing dolt — fonder of money than of work.”

    Memorabilia

  • Belgium - a weekend's gourmandising in Bruges with the gathered clans of cix:gourmet.

    The Newt still lives...

  • Contains scenes of gratuitous gourmandising in Paris...

    Un vrai marriage en la belle France...

  • To be sure, so-called Italian cookbooks compiled by aggressive restaurateurs, weary professional cook-book writers, or gourmandising tourists appear more frequently than one would wish.

    Please Pass the Parmesan

  • Colonel Ellis, sir, was a noted authority in all matters relating to gourmandising and his opinion was especially respected with regard to the quality of wines.

    Recollections With Photogravure Portrait of the Author and a number of Original Letters, of which one by George Meredith and another by Robert Louis Stevenson are reproduced in facsimile

  • You don't think you fellows are going to be allowed to sit gourmandising here whilst we go hungry! '

    VC — A Chronicle of Castle Barfield and of the Crimea

  • Mr. Smith cast his eyes round, and, observing that the little boys 'faces were considerably flushed, and that an air of mere gourmandising had decidedly set in, suddenly became ascetic again.

    The Green Carnation

  • Furious card-playing, gourmandising, drinking, endless conversations about the same things, futile activities and conversations taking up the best part of the day and all the best of a man's forces, leaving only a stunted, wingless life, just rubbish; and to go away and escape was impossible -- one might as well be in a lunatic asylum or in prison with hard labour.

    The House with the Mezzanine and Other Stories

  • A man had administered a severe whipping to the slave in attendance on him, and when Socrates asked: "Why he was so wroth with his own serving-man?" excused himself on the ground that "the fellow was a lazy, gourmandising, good-for-nothing dolt -- fonder of money than of work."

    The Memorabilia

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