Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of marchpane.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • On the table was the same plate of marchpanes that was always there; my uncle wore the same alapca coat as on other days; but opposite to him, in a pink silk dress with a great necklace of pearls about her throat, sat a young woman who was just finishing a tangerine.

    Swann's Way

  • Wild turkeys, ducks, fish and clams were procured by the colonists and cooked, perhaps with some marchpanes also, by the more expert cooks.

    The Women Who Came in the Mayflower

  • “And I know that it was at the Petit-Bourbon, ” responded Gervaise no less warmly, “for I can tell you exactly what my Lord Cardinal’s purveyor set before them: twelve double quarts of hippocras, white, pale, and red; twenty-four boxes of gilded double marchpanes of Lyons; four-and-twenty wax torches of two pounds apiece; and six demi-hogsheads of Beaune wine, both white and yellow, the best that could be procured.

    III. The Story of a Wheaten Cake. Book VI

  • With marchpanes, tarts, and custards great they drink with staring eyes,

    In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 Christmas Poems from 'round the World

  • On the table was the same plate of marchpanes that was always there; my uncle wore the same alpaca coat as on other days; but opposite to him, in a pink silk dress with a great necklace of pearls about her throat, sat a young woman who was just finishing a tangerine.

    Swann's Way

  • This repast consisted of a pitcher of new milk, another pitcher of wine, a dish of poached eggs, a tremendous bunch of water-cress, a large loaf of bread, and marchpanes -- a sweet cake, not unlike the modern macaroon.

    Mistress Margery

  • "And Priscilla we shall look to thee for marchpanes and manchets and plum-porridge and possets and all manner of tasty cates, such as only thou canst make," said the dame hastily, and fixing her eyes upon the girl's face as if to hinder any irreverent laughter at Desire's speech.

    Standish of Standish A story of the Pilgrims

  • Saint, she has an exquisitely neat and quick hand for making pastries and marchpanes, possets and sugared tankards, and confeeding of diapasms, pomanders, and other sweet essences, and cures for the chilblains; and like her she plays excellent well on the harpsichords.

    The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 1 of 3 Who was a sailor, a soldier, a merchant, a spy, a slave among the moors...

  • And in Brome's "City Wit" Mrs. Pyannet tells Toby Sneakup: "You have your kickshaws, your players 'marchpanes -- all show and no meat."

    A Book of the Play Studies and Illustrations of Histrionic Story, Life, and Character

  • (now things with you are pleasures) by showing that there is no nature of tarts and marchpanes, of sweet odors, or of venereal delights, but that there are tarts, marchpanes, perfumes, and women.

    Essays and Miscellanies

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