Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The 14th letter of the modern English alphabet.
  • n. Any of the speech sounds represented by the letter n.
  • n. The 14th in a series.
  • n. Something shaped like the letter N.
  • abbr. Grammar neuter
  • abbr. neutron
  • abbr. Chemistry normal

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • abbr. north
  • abbr. noun
  • abbr. neuter gender
  • abbr. normal
  • abbr. Neutral
  • abbr. No
  • n. The fourteenth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.
  • n. alveolar nasal.
  • n. Sample size.
  • n. neutron
  • n. The fourteenth letter of the English alphabet, called en and written in the Latin script.
  • n. The ordinal number fourteenth, derived from this letter of the English alphabet, called en and written in the Latin script.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • the fourteenth letter of English alphabet, is a vocal consonent, and, in allusion to its mode of formation, is called the dentinasal or linguanasal consonent. Its commoner sound is that heard in ran, done; but when immediately followed in the same word by the sound of g hard or k (as in single, sink, conquer), it usually represents the same sound as the digraph ng in sing, bring, etc. This is a simple but related sound, and is called the gutturo-nasal consonent. See guide to pronunciation, §§ 243-246.
  • n. A measure of space equal to half an M (or em); an en.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • The fourteenth letter and eleventh consonant in the English alphabet, having a corresponding place also in the alphabets from which ours comes.
  • The value of the character has been the same through the whole history of its use. It stands for the “dental” nasal, the nasal sound corresponding to d and t, as does m to b and p, and ng to g and k. This sound, namely, implies for its formation the same check or mute-contact as d and t, with sonant vibration of the vocal cords as in d, and further with unclosure of the passage from the mouth into the nose, and nasal resonance there. Among the nasals, it is by far the most common in English pronunciation (more than twice as common as m, and eight times as common as ng). While all the nasals are semivocalic or liquid, n is the only one which (like l, but not more than half as often) is used with vocalic value in syllable-making: namely, in unaccented syllables, where an accompanying vowel, formerly uttered, is now silenced: examples are token, rotten, open, lesson, reason, oven; such form, on an average, about one in eight hundred of English syllables. The sign n has no variety of sounds; but before ch, j, in the same syllable (as in inch, hinge) it takes on a slightly modified—a palatalized—character; and similarly it is gutturalized, or pronounced as ng, before k and g (hard), as in ink, finger; and its digraph ng (see G) is the usual representative of the guttural or back-palatal nasal, which in none of our alphabets has a letter to itself. N is doubled under the same circumstances as other consonants, and in a few words (as kiln, damn, hymn) is silent. In the phonetic history of our family of languages, n is on the whole a constant sound; that is to say, there is no other sound into which it passes on a large scale; but its loss, with accompanying vowel-modification, has been a frequent process.
  • As a medieval numeral, 90, and with a stroke over it (Ñ), 90,000.
  • In chem., the symbol for nitrogen.
  • In mathematics, an indefinite constant whole number, especially the degree of a quantic or an equation, or the class of a curve.
  • An abbreviation
  • of north or northern;
  • of noun (so used in this work);
  • of neuter;
  • of nail (or nails), a measure.
  • An abbreviation
  • of North America, or North American;
  • of National Academy, or National Academician;
  • in microscopy, of numerical aperture (see objective).
  • n. An abbreviation of the Latin nota bene, literally, mark or note well—that is, take particular notice.
  • An abbreviation
  • of National Guard;
  • of no good or no go.
  • n. An abbreviation of New Latin.
  • An abbreviation
  • of New Style, and
  • of New Series.
  • n. An abbreviation of New Testament.
  • An abbreviation of northwest.
  • An abbreviation
  • of Nationalist;
  • in meteor., of nimbus;
  • in chem., of normal, in reference to the strength of a solution; ⁄110 n. stands for one tenth normal strength, or a normal solution diluted tenfold: also written /10 or /10. See normal solution.
  • of name;
  • of the Latin natus, born;
  • of nephew;
  • of new;
  • of women;
  • of nominative;
  • of noon;
  • of Norse;
  • in electrotechnics, of north pole;
  • of note;
  • of Northern Postal District, London.
  • In elec trotechnics, a symbol
  • used by telegraph operators to indicate that a message is completed and that there is nothing more to follow;
  • of the total number of lines of magnetic flux in a circuit;
  • of the frequency of any harmonic or periodic function of the time.
  • n. An abbreviation of New Brunswick; of North Britain; of North British.
  • n. An abbreviation of New Church; of North Carolina.
  • n. An abbreviation of no date.
  • n. An abbreviation of New England;
  • n. of northeast;
  • n. of Northeastern Postal District, London.
  • An abbreviation
  • of Newfoundland;
  • of New French;
  • of Norman French.
  • An abbreviation
  • of New Granada;
  • of Noble Grand.
  • n. An abbreviation of New Hampshire.
  • n. An abbreviation of Native Infantry.
  • n. An abbreviation of New Jersey.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of north latitude;
  • n. of the Latin non licet, it is not permitted;
  • n. of the Latin non liquet, it does not appear, it is doubtful, the case is not clear;
  • n. of the Latin non longe, not far.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of New Mexico;
  • n. of the Latin nux moschata, nutmeg.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of natural order;
  • n. of New Orleans.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of the Latin nisi prius, unless before;
  • n. of Notary Public.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of National Society;
  • n. of New School;
  • n. of New Side; of the French Notre Seigneur, Our Lord;
  • n. of not specified;
  • n. of Nova Scotia;
  • n. of Numismatic Society.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of New Translation;
  • n. of Northern Territory, of South Australia.
  • n. An abbreviation of name unknown.
  • n. An abbreviation of New Version.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of northwestern;
  • n. of Northwestern Postal District, London.
  • n. An abbreviation of New York, city or State.
  • n. Abbreviations of New Zealand.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the cardinal compass point that is at 0 or 360 degrees
  • n. (of a solution) concentration expressed in gram equivalents of solute per liter
  • n. the 14th letter of the Roman alphabet
  • n. a unit of force equal to the force that imparts an acceleration of 1 m/sec/sec to a mass of 1 kilogram; equal to 100,000 dynes
  • n. a common nonmetallic element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless inert diatomic gas; constitutes 78 percent of the atmosphere by volume; a constituent of all living tissues

Etymologies

From the old Latin N, from the Greek Ν (nu), from an archaic reversed Greek N, from the Phoenician symbol; possibly from an earlier Egyptian hieroglyph of a serpent. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • C ã rÊ t nh iÒu nh µ c ung c Ê p kh ¸c n h a u c ung c Ê p VoIP vµ nh iÒu dÞ c h vô kh ¸c. ø n g dô ng c h ung nh Ê t c ña VoIP c h o s ö dông c ¸ nh ©n  h oÆ c g ia ®×n h lµ c ¸c dÞ

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • NÕu c « ng viÖc liª n q ua n ®Õn nh iÒu vÊ n ®Ò riª ng t­ vµ b ¶o m Ë t th × c òng nª n c ©n nh ¾c ®Õn c ¸c tïy c h ä n c ã s ½n nµy.

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • C ¸c m É u P AM c ã d·i b iª n ®é nè i tiÕp nh a u, s a u ®ã ph ©n c h ia d¶i b iª n ®é nµy th µnh m é t s è g iíi h ¹n c ¸c kh o¶ng.

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • H­íng kh¾ phôc vµ biÖn ph¸p c gi¶i quyÕt • Liªn tôc n© cÊp phÇn mÒm - NÕu h ·ng ph Ç n m Òm c ung c Ê p c ¸c b ¶n ng • v¸ c h o h Ö ®iÒu h µnh th × nª n c µi ®Æ t c h óng ng a y lË

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • DMString: = "W ` n ` n+ ` n ` n ` n ` n-- ` n ` nM ` n ` n+ ` n ` n ` n ` n-- ` n" if vmc > 1

    AutoHotkey Community

  • n ®é (a m plitude), tÇ n s è (fre q ue nc y) vµ ph a (ph a s e), c h uyÓn ®æ i nh ÷ng g i¸ trÞ ®ã th µnh d¹ng s è nh Þ ph ©n (z e ro vµ one) lµ rÊ t kh ã kh ¨n.

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • Loved these n besan laddoos..n will make them this Diwali!

    Moong flour laadoo

  • July 07, 2009 at 1:13 AM for n in 1..100; do mkdir $printf 'lifehacker %03d' $n

    New Folder Wizard Makes Bulk Folder Creation Effortless | Lifehacker Australia

  • July 21, 2009 at 10:09 am ai lukked ebberyware, n mai wotch stawped, n ai lawst mai perse, n..n…n…

    u mad? - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • Finally, the expression on the right hand side of Eq. (18b) is evaluated by using the law of Malus, which is preserved in the quantum mechanical treatment of polarization states: that the probability for a photon polarized in a direction n to pass through an ideal polarization analyzer with axis of transmission n² equals the squared cosine of the angle between n and n².

    Bell's Theorem

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • N. Chemical element symbol for Nitrogen.

    December 16, 2007