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nonevangelicals

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of nonevangelical.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We shall see, however, that while evangelicals were readier to defend racial segregation than nonevangelicals, in part because of where they lived, their distinctiveness on this dimension declined as evangelicalism grew.

    American Grace

  • Among evangelicals, 54 percent said that they would be bothered by a Mormon president, compared to 18 percent of nonevangelicals.10

    American Grace

  • For them, heaven, hell, and judgment day are realities, not metaphors, and moral issues are framed in absolute, black-and-white terms.42 In our 2006 Faith Matters survey, three quarters of evangelicals said that “there are absolutely clear guidelines as to what is good and evil,” while a majority of nonevangelicals said instead “there can never be absolutely clear guidelines as to what is good and evil.”

    American Grace

  • Evidence from the General Social Survey is wholly consistent and further shows that although the level of literalism is twice as high among evangelicals as among other Americans roughly 60 percent as compared to roughly 30 percent, the trends in literalism among evangelicals and nonevangelicals are identical—indeed, belief in the literal truth of scripture is on the decline in all Christian traditions in America.

    American Grace

  • It seems plausible that whatever drew nonevangelicals to the evangelical banner during the first aftershock might also explain the increased loyalty of evangelical offspring in that same period.36

    American Grace

  • The gap on gender roles, though real, as we shall discuss in Chapter 8, was more contained, especially on the issue of women working outside the home, which was accepted as a reality by evangelicals and nonevangelicals alike during the 1970s and 1980s.

    American Grace

  • Two thirds of evangelicals describe themselves as “born again,” as do one third of nonevangelicals.

    American Grace

  • The gap between evangelicals and nonevangelicals on issues like racial intermarriage or a possible black president narrowed in the 1970s and 1980s, suggesting either that the newly recruited evangelicals were less racist than average to begin with or that exposure to evangelical teachings, at least in this period, reduced support for segregation.

    American Grace

  • However, we can get some clues by examining how the views of evangelicals differed from nonevangelicals on these issues, especially during the period of maximum evangelical expansion between the early 1970s and the early 1990s.

    American Grace

  • With these added controls, views on school prayer appear less powerful in distinguishing between evangelicals and nonevangelicals.

    American Grace

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