Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Not of or pertaining to goods.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

non- +‎ goods

Examples

  • Similarly, various kinds of contingent employment have also spread more widely in nongoods sectors, especially in services: According to the BLS estimates for the entire workforce, whereas 34.5 percent of noncontingent workers are employed in the service sector, 54.0 percent of contingent employees work there.99

    FAT and MEAN

  • By contrast, both the technology and trade explanations extend more awkwardly to the nongoods industries.

    FAT and MEAN

  • Similarly, various kinds of contingent employment have also spread more widely in nongoods sectors, especially in services: According to the BLS estimates for the entire workforce, whereas 34.5 percent of noncontingent workers are employed in the service sector, 54.0 percent of contingent employees work there.99

    FAT and MEAN

  • By contrast, both the technology and trade explanations extend more awkwardly to the nongoods industries.

    FAT and MEAN

  • Similarly, various kinds of contingent employment have also spread more widely in nongoods sectors, especially in services: According to the BLS estimates for the entire workforce, whereas 34.5 percent of noncontingent workers are employed in the service sector, 54.0 percent of contingent employees work there.99

    FAT and MEAN

  • By contrast, both the technology and trade explanations extend more awkwardly to the nongoods industries.

    FAT and MEAN

  • While the impact of declining union strength has been felt most severely in manufacturing, both the decline in the real minimum wage and the spread of disposable employment are likely to have had much bigger effects outside the goods sector than within it: Since wages on average are lower in nongoods sectors—especially in retail trade, finance, insurance and real estate, and services—see Table 7.2 in Chapter 7, the falling wage floor is likely to have had its most important consequences in those sectors outside manufacturing.

    FAT and MEAN

  • While the impact of declining union strength has been felt most severely in manufacturing, both the decline in the real minimum wage and the spread of disposable employment are likely to have had much bigger effects outside the goods sector than within it: Since wages on average are lower in nongoods sectors—especially in retail trade, finance, insurance and real estate, and services—see Table 7.2 in Chapter 7, the falling wage floor is likely to have had its most important consequences in those sectors outside manufacturing.

    FAT and MEAN

  • While the impact of declining union strength has been felt most severely in manufacturing, both the decline in the real minimum wage and the spread of disposable employment are likely to have had much bigger effects outside the goods sector than within it: Since wages on average are lower in nongoods sectors—especially in retail trade, finance, insurance and real estate, and services—see Table 7.2 in Chapter 7, the falling wage floor is likely to have had its most important consequences in those sectors outside manufacturing.

    FAT and MEAN

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.