Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Obsolete form of penal.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Perhaps thou dreamest that thou embracest me in thy armes: leave off the darknesse of sleepe and awake thou to receive a penall deprivation of thy sight, lift up thy face, regard thy vengeance and evill fortune, reckon thy miserie; so pleaseth thine eies to a chast woman, that thou shall have blindnesse to thy companion, and an everlasting remorse of thy miserable conscience.

    The Golden Asse

  • (which is their dutie) the incouragement of their woorthie countriemen, by elders aduancements; and the daunting of the vicious, by foure penall examples, to which end (as I take it) chronicles and histories ought cheefelie to be written.

    Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6) England (1 of 12) William the Conqueror

  • And to bring the greater number of men in danger of those his penall lawes (a pestilent policie of a spitefull mind, and sauoring altogither of his French slauerie) he deuised meanes how to bréed, nourish, and increase the multitude of déere, and also to make roome for them in that part of the realme which lieth betwixt Salisburie and the sea southward: [Sidenote: New forrest.] he pulled downe townes, villages, churches, and other buildings for the space of 30. miles, to make thereof a forrest, which at this daie is called New forrest.

    Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6) England (1 of 12) William the Conqueror

  • Commons as a thing penall for a commoner, the contrary should be thought a priviledge to the Lords: that also in this business, the work of a conventicle being but the work of an hour, the cause of a search would be over before a Lord Lieutenant, who may be many miles off, can be sent for; and that all this dispute is but about L100; for it is said in the Act, that it shall be banishment or payment of L100.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 28: April/May 1664

  • Mr. Vaughan, whom I could not to my grief perfectly hear, did say, if that they should be obliged in this manner to, exempt the Lords from every thing, it would in time come to pass that whatever (be [it] never so great) should be voted by the Commons as a thing penall for a commoner, the contrary should be thought a priviledge to the Lords: that also in this business, the work of a conventicle being but the work of an hour, the cause of

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

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