Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of ravelin.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Fort Duquesne was a 160–foot square with corner bastions, two ravelins, and a dry ditch.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Fort Duquesne was a 160–foot square with corner bastions, two ravelins, and a dry ditch.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Fort Duquesne was a 160–foot square with corner bastions, two ravelins, and a dry ditch.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Fort Duquesne was a 160–foot square with corner bastions, two ravelins, and a dry ditch.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Note 29: Military historian John Stapleton suggests that the "demi-lunes" in question were probably not proper demi-lunes at all but rather ravelins — that is, outworks protecting the main walls.

    How Taiwan Became Chinese

  • Go with some engineer or old officer, and view with care the real fortifications of some strong place; and you will get a clearer idea of bastions, half-moons, horn-works, ravelins, glacis, etc., than all the masters in the world could give you upon paper.

    Letters to his son on The Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman

  • There is a double ditch, or moat, the innermost part of which is 180 feet broad; there is a good counterscarp, and a covered way marked out with ravelins and tenailles, but they are not raised a second time after their first settling.

    A Tour through the Eastern Counties of England, 1722

  • There is a double ditch, or moat, the innermost part of which is 180 feet broad; there is a good counterscarp, and a covered way marked out with ravelins and tenailles, but they are not raised a second time after their first settling.

    A Tour through the Eastern Counties of England, 1722

  • It was not a modern fort, built low behind sloping earthen walls that would bounce the cannon shot high over ditches and ravelins, but a high fortress of ancient and sullen menace.

    Sharpe's Rifles

  • The defences were not fearsome; Santiago de Compostela was no frontier city, enwrapped in star-trace and ravelins, but the ramparts could still be a terrible obstacle to an infantry attack.

    Sharpe's Rifles

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.