Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of re-organize.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • You don't want to be in a bad mood when you're taking a test, no evidence that it really sort of fundamentally changes the brain or re-organizes the way your neurons or anything fancy like that.

    How We Pay Attention

  • He re-organizes in his mind all the information he previously has gained for his own benefit.

    Certain Success

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