Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Archaic words work best, IMHO, when they can be defined in context - "the gleam of a saex blade," or some such, at least tells us it's a knife or sword.

    Archaic terminology in historical fiction

  • Thus they it spake, and eft they it brake, for Hengest the traitor thus gan he teach his comrades, that each should take a long saex (knife), and lay by his shank, within his hose, where he it might hide.

    Roman de Brut. English

  • This would imply that the Anglo-Saxon prefix _saex_ has by time been transmuted into Shake, and that the suffix, _berht_ has become pear or pere.

    Shakespeare's Lost Years in London, 1586-1592

  • What was now the Hall, had evidently been the atrium; the round shield, with its pointed boss, the spear, sword, and small curved saex of the early

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Complete

  • [98] It is a disputed question whether the saex of the earliest Saxon invaders was a long or short curved weapon, -- nay, whether it was curved or straight; but the author sides with those who contend that it was a short, crooked weapon, easily concealed by a cloak, and similar to those depicted on the banner of the East Saxons.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 12

  • With his spear, and saex, and his shield, he stood before me; and his face, though pale as that of one long dead, was stern as the face of a warrior in the van of armed men; he stretched his hand, and he smote his saex on his shield, and the clang sounded hollow; the gyves broke at the clash -- I sprang to my feet, and

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 04

  • There were the small round shield and spear of the earlier Saxon, with his vizorless helm, and the short curved knife or saex [98], from which some antiquarians deem that the Saxish men take their renowned name.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 03

  • With his spear, and saex, and his shield, he stood before me; and his face, though pale as that of one long dead, was stern as the face of a warrior in the van of armed men; he stretched his hand, and he smote his saex on his shield, and the clang sounded hollow; the gyves broke at the clash -- I sprang to my feet, and I stood side by side with the phantom, dauntless.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Complete

  • "It rises in the midst of the flame, pale as the mist on the mountain, and vast as the giants of old; with the saex, and the spear, and the shield, of the sons of Woden.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 04

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