signal-officer love

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An officer in the signal-service of an army; an officer of the signal corps.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The signal-officer at Cobb's Hill reported, at half-past eleven A.M., that a cavalry column had passed that point from Richmond towards Petersburg, taking forty minutes to pass.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • The signal-officer had built a platform on the ridge-pole of the rice-mill.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • Leaving our horses behind the stacks of rice-straw, we all got on the roof of a shed attached to the mill, wherefrom I could communicate with the signal-officer above, and at the same time look out toward Ossabaw Sound, and across the Ogeechee River at Fort McAllister.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • The signal-officer reported that by studying the enemy's signals he had learned the key, and that he could read their signals.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • This betokened the approach of Hazen's division, which had been anxiously expected, and soon thereafter the signal-officer discovered about three miles above the fort a signal-flag, with which he conversed, and found it to belong to General Hazen, who was preparing to assault the fort, and wanted to know if I were there.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • Indeed, his indifferent attack was not at all worthy the excellent soldiers he commanded, and when I learned that it was his intention to withdraw from the enemy's front, and this, too, on the indefinite report of a signal-officer that a

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • Fort McAllister was taken, and the good news was instantly sent by the signal-officer to our navy friends on the approaching gunboat, for a point of timber had shut out Fort McAllister from their view, and they had not seen the action at all, but must have heard the cannonading.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • It was his signal-officer who thought it out first.

    The U-boat hunters

  • He went on deck just as his signal-officer came to tell him the ship was ashore.

    The U-boat hunters

  • An amiable young signal-officer who had been at his telephone some thirty kilometres away when the city was taken and was off at three next morning, sat opposite me and told with great spirit how the only common language between him and some of his polyglot men was the English he had learned in school and they had picked up in America.

    Antwerp to Gallipoli A Year of the War on Many Fronts—and Behind Them

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