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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Here are the dogs, who will eat old coats, or anything; and, near the dwellings, here is a snow-bunting — robin redbreast of the Arctic lands.

    The North-West Passage

  • A party of our sailors once, on landing, took some sticks from a large heap, and uncovered the nest of a snow-bunting with young, the bird flew to a little distance, but seeing that the men sat down, and harmed her not, continued to seek food and supply her little ones, with full faith in the good intentions of the party.

    The North-West Passage

  • In certain localities in the south of England the cirl-bunting (_E. cirlus_) is also a resident; and in winter vast flocks of the snow-bunting (_Plectrophanes nivalis_), at once recognizable by its pointed wings and elongated hind-claws, resort to our shores and open grounds.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 "Bulgaria" to "Calgary"

  • When they landed they found the ground covered thick with berries dark and luscious, and while they gathered these, a black and white snow-bunting flitted about them on its long wings.

    A Child's Book of Saints

  • (_Oriolus galbula_), whooper-swan (_Cygnus musicus_), snow-bunting

    Hertfordshire

  • Forth sallied the two children, with a hop-skip-and-jump, that carried them at once into the very heart of a huge snowdrift, whence Violet emerged like a snow-bunting, while little Peony floundered out with his round face in full bloom.

    The Snow-Image: A Childish Miracle

  • Meanwhile, I go to make the circle of my dance smaller; who knows but to-morrow I may be a snow-bunting on your tall cliffs, or a little homeless wren seeking shelter in your valley.

    The Jessica Letters: An Editor's Romance

  • A snow-bunting had found its way through the loose stones which composed this little tomb, and its now forsaken, neatly-built nest, was found placed on the neck of the child.

    Rural Hours

  • Clarke shot a snow-bunting, a little bird hardly bigger than a sparrow.

    A Man's Woman

  • Forth sallied the two children, with a hop-skip-and-jump, that carried them at once into the very heart of a huge snow-drift, whence Violet emerged like a snow-bunting, while little Peony floundered out with his round face in full bloom.

    Famous Stories Every Child Should Know

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