Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of supine.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It is easy for men to write, one after another, of cases and genders, moods and tenses, gerunds and supines: in these and the like there has been great diligence used; and particles themselves, in some languages, have been, with great show of exactness, ranked into their several orders.

    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

  • The supines of Shakespeare outnumber the employés of most authors.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XVI., December, 1880.

  • The fact that he got through his supines without mistake the next day, encouraged him to persevere in this appendix to his prayers, and neutralized any scepticism that might have arisen from Mr. Stelling’s continued demand for Euclid.

    I. Tom’s “First Half”. Book II—School-Time

  • At first recitation The Roman flunked Stover on the review, on the gerund and gerundive, on the use of hendiadys -- a most unfair exhibition of persecution -- on several supines, and requested him to remain after class.

    The Varmint

  • Pretty, dainty, inconsequential little Rosalie was preëminently fashioned for romance; it clung to her golden hair and looked from her eyes, She might be extremely hazy as to the difference between participles and supines, she might hesitate in her definition of a parallelopiped, but when the subject under discussion was one of sentiment, she spoke with conviction.

    Just Patty

  • One was to run a verb, as it was called, through all the successive tenses and moods in the first person, then in the second person, the third, and so on: and to repeat the imperative, the infinitive, the gerunds, supines, and participles.

    Documenting the American South: The Southern Experience in 19-th Century America

  • The fact that he got through his supines without mistake the next day, encouraged him to persevere in this appendix to his prayers, and neutralized any scepticism that might have arisen from Mr. Stelling's continued demand for Euclid.

    The Mill on the Floss

  • To show him a withered frost-bitten verb, that wanted its preterite, wanted its supines, wanted, in fact, everything in this world, fruits or blossoms, that make a verb desirable, was to earn the Don's gratitude for life.

    Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers — Volume 1

  • Some verbs which seem borrowed from the Latin, are formed from the present tense, and some from the supines.

    A Grammar of the English Tongue

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