Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Works or an establishment for the mining or manufacture of tin, or for the making of tinware.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We find him protecting private enterprise on Roborough Down against the borough of Plymouth, which desired to stop the tin-works, and the year closes with his activities on behalf of the 'establishment of good laws among tinners.'

    Raleigh

  • Yarranton was very civilly received by the miners, and, contrary to his expectation, he was allowed freely to inspect the tin-works and examine the methods by which the iron-plates were rolled out, as well as the process of tinning them.

    Industrial Biography

  • Yarranton, "having been raised by the riches proceeding from the tin-works" -- not less than 80,000 men depending upon the trade for their subsistence; and when Yarranton visited Awe, he found that a statue had been erected to the memory of the Cornish miner who first discovered the tin.

    Industrial Biography, Iron Workers and Tool Makers

  • Passing from hence, and ferrying over Foy River or the River Foweth (call it as you please), we come into a large country without many towns in it of note, but very well furnished with gentlemen's seats, and a little higher up with tin-works.

    From London to Land's End and Two Letters from the "Journey through England by a Gentleman"

  • At dinner the talk diverged from sport to the ancient tin-works, stone circles, camps and cromlechs on the tors about us, and from there to touch speculatively on the darker side of the old religions: hence at length the doctor's story, which he told over the pipes and whisky, leaning his arms upon the table and gazing at it rather than at us, as though drawing his memories out of depths below its polished surface.

    The White Wolf and Other Fireside Tales

  • Foweth (call it as you please), we come into a large country without many towns in it of note, but very well furnished with gentlemen’s seats, and a little higher up with tin-works.

    From London to Land's End

  • "several fine cities," says Yarranton, "having been raised by the riches proceeding from the tin-works" -- not less than 80,000 men depending upon the trade for their subsistence; and when Yarranton visited Awe, he found that a statue had been erected to the memory of the Cornish miner who first discovered the tin.

    Industrial Biography

  • Even tin-mining was not pursued very actively till a comparatively late period, though the Bodmin settlement may be connected with tin-works close by.] [Illustration: FIG.

    The Romanization of Roman Britain

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.