Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of torsion.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The jerky regress here is wryly suggestive of the awkward torsions of adolescence, but there are signs elsewhere that holding the world at a remove has become a permanent state of mind.

    Booking a Journey

  • Wild and slippery torsions bring to mind animal life: This piece has flippers, that one sniffs its rear end, another walks like a duck.

    Scrapyard Sculptures Charm, But Bronzed Bodies Disappoint

  • We are rightly in awe of the torsions in the poetry of Paul Celan and rightly enamoured of the suspiring voice in Samuel Beckett because these are evidence that art can rise to the occasion and somehow be the corollary of Celan's stricken destiny as Holocaust survivor and

    Nobel Lectures-Literature 1995

  • The marvel, however, is in the small steel superposed magnetic wire producing by slight elastic torsions from

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 392, July 7, 1883

  • On restoring the wire to its original place, it will be extremely flexible, and we may now superpose several contrary polarities under contrary torsions, as already described.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 392, July 7, 1883

  • If we take a flat bar of soft iron, of 30 or more centimeters in length, and hold it vertically (giving while thus held a few torsions, vibrations, or, better still, a few slight blows with a wooden mallet, in order to allow its molecules to rotate with perfect freedom), we find its lower end to be of strong north polarity, and its upper end south.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 392, July 7, 1883

  • The effects of superposed magnetism and its double polarity I have produced in a variety of ways, such as by the electro-magnetic influence of coils, or in very soft iron simply by the directive influence of the earth's magnetism, reversing the rod and torsions when held in the magnetic meridian, these rods when placed magnetic west showing distinctly the double polar effects.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 392, July 7, 1883

  • Soft iron soon loses the structure, or becomes enfeebled, under the constant to and fro torsions requisite where we desire a constant change of polarity, as described later in the magnetic bells.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 392, July 7, 1883

  • If, while holding this vertically, we give freedom to its molecules by torsions, vibrations, or, better still, by a few blows with

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 392, July 7, 1883

  • The superposed magnetism then becomes a single directive force, and we can then by a few vibrations or torsions reduce the rod to its ordinary condition.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 392, July 7, 1883

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