Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of viceregent.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And since God is in principle the sovereign, the supreme head of the Islamic state, with the Prophet, and after the Prophet the caliphs, as His viceregents, then God as sovereign commands the army.

    The Enemies of God

  • None of the viceregents of heaven, as they claimed to be, knew much or seemed to care much about the word of the Gentle One of Bethlehem, whom they had adopted as their titular divinity much as men in commerce adopt a trade-mark.

    "Marse Henry" : an autobiography,

  • Are they to be considered as viceregents allowed to reign over a small domain, and answerable for their conduct to a higher tribunal, liable to error?

    A vindication of the rights of woman

  • None of the viceregents of heaven, as they claimed to be, knew much or seemed to care much about the word of the Gentle One of

    Marse Henry, Complete An Autobiography

  • When the crimes of Lebon, one of the worst, if not the very worst, of the viceregents of the Committee of Public Safety, had so maddened the people of the Department of the North that they resorted to the desperate expedient of imploring the protection of the Convention,

    Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches — Volume 2

  • The law of retaliation must be made consistent with the law of love: nor, if any have injured us, is our recompence in our own hands, but in the hands of God, to whose wrath we must give place; and sometimes in the hands of his viceregents, where it is necessary for the preservation of the public peace; but it will not justify us in hurting our brother to say that he began, for it is the second blow that makes the quarrel; and when we were injured, we had an opportunity not to justify our injuring him, but to show ourselves the true disciples of Christ, by forgiving him.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume V (Matthew to John)

  • There are not within it "viceregents who can be said properly to supply his place; no interpreters upon whom his subjects are absolutely to depend; no judges over the conscience or religion of his people.

    Political Thought in England from Locke to Bentham

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