Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A sword or hanger.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete A sword, or hanger.
  • noun Prov. Eng., Prov. Eng., Prov. Eng. The shoveler.
  • noun Prov. Eng. The poachard.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete A sword, or hanger.
  • noun UK, dialect, obsolete The shoveler, a type of duck.
  • noun UK, dialect, obsolete The poachard, a type of duck.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Compare English dialect and Scots whingar, whinger; perhaps from Anglo-Saxon winn contention, war + geard, gyrd, a staff, rod, yard; or compare Anglo-Saxon verb for "whistle", English whine.

Examples

  • In The Bride of Lammermoor (Chapter VI) Bucklaw vows, "I will chop them off with my whinger," and one feels quite let down when he learns that a whinger is but a whinyard, which is merely a short sword.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XI No 3

  • Mr. Payne renders “Sharít” by whinyard: it must be a chopper-like weapon, with a pin or screw

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Here he was interrupted by his asthma, but, nevertheless, continued to interpose his person between Colepepper (who had unsheathed his whinyard, and was making vain passes at his antagonist) and Nigel, who had stepped back to take his sword, and now held it undrawn in his left hand.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • "By my troth, young sir," he said, "you are as long in the face as the devil at a christening, and I cannot marvel at it, for I have sailed these waters since I was as high as this whinyard, and yet I never saw more sure promise of an evil night."

    The White Company

  • "By my troth, young sir," he said, "you are as long in the face as the devil at a christening, and I cannot marvel at it, for I have sailed these waters since I was as high as this whinyard, and yet I never saw more sure promise of an evil night."

    The White Company

  • "By my troth, young sir," he said, "you are as long in the face as the devil at a christening, and I cannot marvel at it, for I have sailed these waters since I was as high as this whinyard, and yet I never saw more sure promise of an evil night."

    The White Company

  • "By my troth, young sir," he said, "you are as long in the face as the devil at a christening, and I cannot marvel at it, for I have sailed these waters since I was as high as this whinyard, and yet I never saw more sure promise of an evil night."

    The White Company

  • 'He got a wipe over the arm from the gauger's whinyard.

    Micah Clarke His Statement as made to his three grandchildren Joseph, Gervas and Reuben During the Hard Winter of 1734

  • "By my troth, young sir," he said, "you are as long in the face as the devil at a christening, and I cannot marvel at it, for I have sailed these waters since I was as high as this whinyard, and yet I never saw more sure promise of an evil night."

    The White Company

  • I like him not, with his laced band and feather, his book and lute: harquebuss and whinyard are the tools for these days.

    Rob of the bowl : a legend of St. Inigoe's,

Comments

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  • ист. кинжал, кортик

    May 5, 2010