Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • An Arabic dynasty (750–1258) that expanded the Muslim empire. It was named for al-Abbas (566?–652), paternal uncle of the prophet Muhammad.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or relating to the Abbasid caliphs.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The teenage prince Ma'mūn would have known Baghdad at the height of its glory: a vast, beautiful city characterised by the domes and archways of its famously intricate Abbasid architecture.

    When Baghdad was centre of the scientific world

  • His name was al-Kindi (801-873) (Latinised as Alkindus) and he is regarded as the first of the Abbasid polymaths.

    When Baghdad was centre of the scientific world

  • He said it was one of the Machiavellian tales of rulers and ruled, of eaters and eaten, that ninth-century Arabic scribes adapted from earlier story collections during the great Abbasid translation orgy in Iraq.

    Day of Honey

  • But its name is a reminder of the expansion and transformation of this proud city over the years since its foundation in AD762 as the new seat of power of the mighty Abbasid empire.

    When Baghdad was centre of the scientific world

  • In the eighth century, when the Caliph al-Mansur founded Baghdad and made Iraq the center of the Abbasid Empire, he initiated what people still refer to nostalgically as the Golden Age of Islam.

    Day of Honey

  • Long after the war, a friend told me that the story of the stones went back to the Abbasid Empire.

    Day of Honey

  • The despotic sultans of the Umayyad and later the Abbasid dynasties found the death sentence on apostasy very useful, for they could simply condemn their critics as heretics and got them executed.

    Mustafa Akyol: The Case of Pastor Yousef Nadarkhani -- Apostasy from Islam is a Right, Not A Crime

  • It operated intermittently until 767 A.D., when the Abbasid caliph al-Mansur closed it to cut off the supply of goods to insurgents in the Nile Delta and Medina.

    Exodus

  • The despotic sultans of the Umayyad and later the Abbasid dynasties found the death sentence on apostasy very useful, for they could simply condemn their critics as heretics and got them executed.

    Mustafa Akyol: The Case of Pastor Yousef Nadarkhani -- Apostasy from Islam is a Right, Not A Crime

  • Medieval chroniclers tell how the Tigris ran red with blood on the first day and black with ink the next, when the Mongols eviscerated the Abbasid libraries and tossed the books into the river.

    Day of Honey

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