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  • Scholars have identified seven levels of authenticity which they have organized in a hierarchy ranging from literal authorship, meaning written in the author's own hand, to outright forgery:

    Literal authorship. A church leader writes a letter in his own hand.

    Dictation. A church leader dictates a letter almost word for word to an amanuensis.

    Delegated authorship. A church leader describes the basic content of an intended letter to a disciple or to an amanuensis.

    Posthumous authorship. A church leader dies, and his disciples finish a letter that he had intended to write, sending it posthumously in his name.

    Apprentice authorship. A church leader dies, and disciples who had been authorized to speak for him while he was alive continue to do so by writing letters in his name years or decades after his death.

    Honorable pseudepigraphy. A church leader dies, and admirers seek to honor him by writing letters in his name as a tribute to his influence and in a sincere belief that they are responsible bearers of his tradition.

    Forgery. A church leader obtains sufficient prominence that, either before or after his death, people seek to exploit his legacy by forging letters in his name, presenting him as a supporter of their own ideas.

    May 31, 2016

  • The Dutch word for slipped is gleed.

    May 31, 2016

  • Your epic needs echoes Homeric;
    For thrillers use tough talk generic.
    If nonfiction's your game
    Then make it your aim
    Above all to be exoteric.

    May 31, 2016

  • foraging for metaphors - looking for straws.

    May 31, 2016

  • We don't have a list of wrappings?

    May 31, 2016

  • Never trusted Troy.

    May 31, 2016

  • SPAM.

    May 31, 2016

  • A moment when you realise your life is so mundane or so fusterclucked that you'd rather be at the beach.
    Cf teachable moment.

    May 31, 2016

  • See lottery etymology.

    May 31, 2016

  • Oi, excellent comment here by the Big O.

    May 31, 2016

  • Probably called something else in gorillaspeak.

    May 31, 2016

  • This phrase is corporatespeak for a failure where , in hindsight, different actions could have been taken.

    spotted in the news today regarding Cincinnati Gorilla.

    May 31, 2016

  • A parable mates sundry pieces:
    The set-up we call diegesis,
    But all who are able
    To tinker a fable
    Will use it to prop up a thesis.

    May 30, 2016

  • Japanese pepper, Zanthoxylum piperitum. Leaves and berries are both eaten, fresh or dried.

    May 30, 2016

  • "Remember, too, that Mr. Trump is a clear case of someone born on third base who imagines that he hit a triple: He inherited a fortune, and it’s far from clear that he has expanded that fortune any more than he would have if he had simply parked the money in an index fund."
    - Paul Krugman, "Trump’s Delusions of Competence" NY Times, 27 May 2016. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/27/opinion/trumps-delusions-of-competence.html?WT.mc_id=2016-MAY-OTB-INTL_AUD_DEV-0510-0531&WT;.mc_ev=click&ad-keywords=IntlAudDev&_r=0

    May 30, 2016

  • My father made a passing reference to the uncanny-valley response—the human aversion to things that look almost but not quite like people. The uncanny-valley response is a hard thing to define, much less to test for. But if true, it explains why the faces of chimps so unsettle some of us.
    Karen Joy Fowler, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (Penguin Group): 2013), p. 102

    May 30, 2016

  • one of my most prized possessions was the skull of a woodcock, a probing bird, with enormous eye sockets and a distinctively pitted bill tip. These pits can be seen only after the leathery outer covering of the bill—the ramphotheca—has been removed.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • The bill-tip organ was discovered by the French anatomist D. E. Goujon in 1869. . . . this organ consists of a series of pits in the upper and lower beak, full of touch-sensitive cells.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 76.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    in a number of birds, most obviously nightjars, oilbirds and flycatchers, on the corners of the mouth is an array of stiff, hair-like bristles. These are modified contour feathers, called rictal (mouth) bristles, and the presence of a well-developed nerve supply at their base betrays their sensory function.
    Id., p. 85.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • Ornithologists refer to one individual preening another as allopreening ('allo' meaning 'other'), to distinguish it from the more usual self-preening.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 75

    May 30, 2016

  • Increasing the volume of sounds uttered in a noisy environment is actually a reflex known as the Lombard effect, named after Etienne Lombard, a French ear, nose and throat specialist who discovered it in humans in the early 1900s. The Lombard effect is most obvious when somebody is talking to you when, for example, you have your iPod headphones on and in respnse you—unwittingly—increase the volume of your reply, and they say: 'No need to shout!'
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 59

    May 30, 2016

  • The ability to focus on one particular voice or song against a hubbub of background noise is known as the cocktail-party effect. This is a common problem for birds that live in a noisy world. Just think of the dawn chorus. In pristine habitats there may be as many as thirty different songbird species—with several individuals of each—singing at once, and the effect can be almost deafening. Each bird has to dinstinguish not only its own species, but also different individuals.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 57

    May 30, 2016

  • The ability to focus on one particular voice or song against a hubbub of background noise is known as the cocktail-party effect. This is a common problem for birds that live in a noisy world. Just think of the dawn chorus. In pristine habitats there may be as many as thirty different songbird species—with several individuals of each—singing at once, and the effect can be almost deafening. Each bird has to dinstinguish not only its own species, but also different individuals.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 57

    May 30, 2016

  • One of the most brilliantly coloured of South American birds (and there are many) is the Andean cock-of-the-rock. The male has the most intensely red body, a jet-black tail and outermost wing feathers, and unexpectedly silvery-white innermost wing feathers. So-named because it nests among rocks on cliff ledges, and because of its cocky Mohican-like crest, this pigeon-sized bird is a major draw to birdwatchers visiting Ecuador. The males display in groups, referred to as 'leks' . . . .
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), pp. 19-20.

    May 30, 2016

  • One of the most brilliantly coloured of South American birds (and there are many) is the Andean cock-of-the-rock. The male has the most intensely red body, a jet-black tail and outermost wing feathers, and unexpectedly silvery-white innermost wing feathers. So-named because it nests among rocks on cliff ledges, and because of its cocky Mohican-like crest, this pigeon-sized bird is a major draw to birdwatchers visiting Ecuador. The males display in groups, referred to as 'leks' . . . .
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), pp. 19-20.

    May 30, 2016

  • One of the most brilliantly coloured of South American birds (and there are many) is the Andean cock-of-the-rock. The male has the most intensely red body, a jet-black tail and outermost wing feathers, and unexpectedly silvery-white innermost wing feathers. So-named because it nests among rocks on cliff ledges, and because of its cocky Mohican-like crest, this pigeon-sized bird is a major draw to birdwatchers visiting Ecuador. The males display in groups, referred to as 'leks' . . . .
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), pp. 19-20.






    May 30, 2016

  • meaning of access group in pega

    May 30, 2016

  • It all had something to do with Umwelt, a word I very much liked the sound of and repeated many times like a drumbeat until I was made to stop. I didn't care so much what Umwelt meant back then, but it turns out to refer to the specific way each particular organism experiences the world.
    Karen Joy Fowler, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (Penguin Group): 2013), p. 99.

    May 30, 2016

  • My mother was often aggravated those days. It was something new for her, analeptic doses of righteous aggravation. She was rejuvenated by it.
    Karen Joy Fowler, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (Penguin Group): 2013), p. 6.

    May 30, 2016

  • we've been offered this gite in the Ardèche for a week . . ."
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 347.

    May 30, 2016

  • Amelia had been behaving even more oddly than usual, blethering about Olivia . . . . Blethering. That was one of his father's words.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 324

    May 30, 2016

  • A middle-aged man was climbing out of the river onto the bank—bollock-naked and skinny and tanned all over. A nudist? They called themselves naturalists now, didn't they?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 288.

    (Character misuses "naturalist" for "naturism.")

    May 30, 2016

  • A middle-aged man was climbing out of the river onto the bank—bollock-naked and skinny and tanned all over. A nudist? They called themselves naturalists now, didn't they?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 288.

    May 30, 2016

  • A middle-aged man was climbing out of the river onto the bank—bollock-naked and skinny and tanned all over. A nudist? They called themselves naturalists now, didn't they?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 288.

    May 30, 2016

  • at that moment a particularly manky tom decided it needed to spray its territory and favored Quintus's leg as one of its outposts.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 284.

    May 30, 2016

  • In the sense of "headbutt" (which shows up at least once in the definitions above):

    Quintus was sporting a considerable plaster across a nose that looked damaged in just the way you would expect a nose to be damaged if you'd been nutted by someone who was trying to stop you from pistol-whipping them.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 282.

    May 30, 2016

  • before he cold reply a cry like a huntsman's tantivy from the top end of the garden announced the arrival of Quintus Rain.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 281.

    May 30, 2016

  • They drove past the village school and she could hear James making snorting noises. She'd heard him refer to the the village kids as "oiks" and she'd almost slapped him. She suspected his slow male brain had confused "oik" with "oink," which was why he always snorted when he came within breathing distance of the lower orders.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 224.

    May 30, 2016

  • Sister Michael . . . was an "extern." There were six externs at the convent, negotiating with the outside world on behalf of the "interns"—the ones who never left, who spent their days, day after day, until they died, in prayer and contemplation.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 224.

    May 30, 2016

  • Sister Michael . . . was an "extern." There were six externs at the convent, negotiating with the outside world on behalf of the "interns"—the ones who never left, who spent their days, day after day, until they died, in prayer and contemplation.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 224.

    May 30, 2016

  • Was (a long-missing three-year-old) enclosed somewhere, under a floor, in the earth? No more than a tiny pile of leveret-thin bones waiting to be found.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 164.

    May 30, 2016

  • Still—and it was a close call—Jackson preferred the summer population to the yahs and hooray Henrys of term time. Was it just the envy of the underclass?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • Still—and it was a close call—Jackson preferred the summer population to the yahs and hooray Henrys of term time. Was it just the envy of the underclass?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • All that wealth and privilege in the hands of a few while the streets were full of the dispossessed, the beggars, the jakies, the mad.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • All that wealth and privilege in the hands of a few while the streets were full of the dispossessed, the beggars, the jakies, the mad.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • "Don't be a crosspatch, Mr. Brodie. You're a much nicer person than you pretend to be, you know."
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 160.

    May 30, 2016

  • To vandalize a National/Federal monument is both sad and sickening at the same time (SACKENING)

    May 30, 2016

  • Caroline . . . had never been to an agricultural fair in her life and was charmed by everything. . . . the crocheted shawls and knitted matinee jackets . . .
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 145.

    May 30, 2016

  • SACKENING; means that something is both SAD and SICKENING at the same time.

    May 30, 2016

  • She loved that word, "misericord," because it sounded so wretched and yet it wasn't. It meant tenderhearted, from the Latin for heart, "cor," from which you also get "core" and "cordial" but not "cardiac," which from via the Latin from the Greek for heart—"kardia" (although they mut surely be related at some ancient, ur-level.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 138.

    May 30, 2016

  • She was a lousy cook and didn't even possess a sewing basket, but she did all the DIY in their little box house. She said to him once that when women learned that wall anchors weren't the mysterious objects they though the were, they would rule the world.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 95.

    May 30, 2016

  • Howell dated from Jackson's army days—they had started out as squaddies together.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 84.

    May 30, 2016

  • Binky was over ninety and was the widow of "a Peterhouse fellow," a philosophy don (despite living in Cambridge for fourteen years, Jackson still though of the mafia when he heard that word).
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 82.

    May 30, 2016

  • A dish of lasagna, neatly cling filmed, was sitting in the fridge, waiting to be heated up later . . . .
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 66.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • She thought they should get some chickens of their own and perhaps a goat to milk, because maybe something was missing—maybe it would just take one fat wyandotte to make the idyll possible. Or a Sicilian buttercup. Really, chickens had the prettiest names—the Brahma and the marsh daisy and the faverolles. . . . Or perhaps a goat—a LaMancha or a Bionda dell'Adamello. . . . Goats had ridiculous names—the West African dwarf and the Tennessee fainting goat.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 64.

    May 30, 2016

  • Above a sign that read "My First Item 1955" was a small brass plate from Perth Amboy, New Jersey—a cover for an interlock, the mechanism that keeps the doors closed when an elevator is on the move. Carr and Wilk discussed an accident that Carr blamed on an interlock situation.
    Nick Paumgarten, "Love of the Elevator," New Yorker, May 16, 2016, p. 36.

    May 30, 2016

  • Patrick Carr, the founder of the Elevator Historical Society, and his associate director, Daniel Levinson Wilk, "advanced the hot take that it was another Otis, a Massachusetts inventor named Otis Tufts, who deserved more credit for the introduction of the elevator as a passenger conveyance" than Elisha Otis, the founder of the Otis Elevator Company.
    Nick Paumgarten, "Love of the Elevator," New Yorker, May 16, 2016, p. 34

    May 30, 2016

  • Lispers will either love or hate the closed/clothed rhyme in that limerick.

    May 29, 2016

  • Wow, what a fun word.

    May 29, 2016

  • Your problem qms is that you're two-weaselly distracted.
    *chortlechortlechortle*

    May 29, 2016

  • It's all right Carolynsteiner. Don't mind bilby. Some of the nicest people I know fard.

    May 29, 2016

  • Mountain bike with electric motor

    May 29, 2016

  • Hey, give me a chance. I'm have just started.

    May 29, 2016

  • Our Ernest abroad keeps his hand in.
    There's never a word he'll abandon,
    Though it does seem a vagary
    To glean such as waragi -
    A word that's not ours but Ugandan.

    Find out more about Ernest Bafflewit

    May 29, 2016

  • Who farded?

    May 29, 2016

  • GRIT award stands for Growth, Resilience, Initiative, & Tenacity.

    May 28, 2016

  • How can you tell that an artist's work is selling fast?

    May 28, 2016

  • Since a cart may be open or closed
    Appropriate dress is supposed.
    If you take a whirlicote
    In Winter a burly coat
    Is worn by the rider well-clothed.

    May 28, 2016

  • I originally saw this in the movie Master and Commander. A quick search shows this being used in 1941 National Geographic magazine.

    May 28, 2016

  • Looks like a feeble borrowing of the "lesser of two weevils" joke from O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin novels. Or is there something here too subtle for me?

    May 28, 2016

  • Anyone else notice this?

    May 28, 2016

  • I've never watched Frozen. Heard the song a bunch of times.

    May 28, 2016

  • autonomous spaceport drone ship

    aka "It's not a barge!"

    May 28, 2016

  • Frozen?

    May 28, 2016

  • space talk - Secondary Engine Cutoff

    May 28, 2016

  • space talk - Main Engine Cutoff

    May 28, 2016

  • So now we know where Spamski gets those blocks of text, although I have to say that "Smoking of the lake..." is a less lively example than most.

    May 27, 2016

  • Two cents

    May 27, 2016

  • Greetings.

    May 27, 2016

  • hello

    May 27, 2016

  • fdshfnkashfk;asfnasduie

    May 27, 2016

  • No matter how clearly malignant
    The Trumpies think their man's benignant,
    But cite, if you dare,
    Preposterous hair
    And see them all rise up indignant.

    May 27, 2016

  • Can I have my api key ?

    May 27, 2016

  • Hello henry, welcome to Wordnik.

    May 27, 2016

  • "Smoking of the lake, staccato scansion of the potholes tearing up
    Burnham’s grid, pathos of plans to haul all the basement suitcases
    full of ice-chunks across the bought-out offset carbon paths into the
    red blot of Pacific lingering in the daily graphs of the explainers..."
    - Polar Vortextet,http://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet/2016/05/aeolian-harping-materiality-of-poetry-in-the-age-of-digital-reproduction-ecoprecarity-part-1/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+HarrietTheBlog+(Harriet:+The+Blog)

    May 27, 2016

  • It's like halitosis for lettering.

    May 27, 2016

  • http://www.nationalreview.com/human-exceptionalism/435917/now-euthanasia-dignicide
    Boudewijn Chabot (de Einder) disclosed the name of the patient whose death 25 years ago brought him into conflict with the Dutch Supreme Court and opened the way for help for psychiatric patients. He is now using the term ”dignicide” (which my spell checker is rejecting) as the word promoted by some to describe a self-selected rational and dignified death.

    May 27, 2016

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