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  • *press*

    August 3, 2015

  • Oh, look! A delicious food pellet!

    August 3, 2015

  • Bilbybagginses, there is a typo in your comment about the technical foul--obviously disqualifying said comment. And a non-accent is, by its very nature, not an accent. (Once nebraksans conquer the airwaves, we'll use that platform to convince the rest of the world of this.) And furthermore, if the vending machine choses not to give you any tasty pellets, why not try putting some brackets around something in your own comments? (I find food pellet to be a yummy alternative.)

    August 3, 2015

  • How do you get a pellet of umbrage from this vending machine?

    August 3, 2015

  • Kew has published a monograph on the genus Erythronium I want it.

    August 3, 2015

  • See cantilever for a more complete definition. Also cantaliver. Vowel play.

    August 3, 2015

  • cf. dialectal croatian from the Istrian peninsula, šoldi (same meaning)

    August 3, 2015

  • Besides, isn't the 'null accent' an accent? It may be bland and want to hide in plain sight but it's still an accent.

    August 3, 2015

  • Hey, you can't take umbrage at a comment before I make it. I therefore take umbrage at your techncial foul.

    August 3, 2015

  • Soldi also refers to money in general.

    August 2, 2015

  • "To pay the bills, they built a two-bedroom cabin and opened a farm stay. County zoning leaders gave Leaping Lamb a conditional use permit after contacting neighbors. In three years, the business has grown by word of mouth and is so busy now the couple hired a maid to clean the cabin."

    August 2, 2015

  • n A trend in the American agricultural industry to include entertainment endeavors on the farm.
    Looking to diversify their sources of income, small farmers are expanding their "agritourism" or "agritainment" operations beyond the traditional pumpkin-picking, hayride and petting zoo.

    August 2, 2015

  • "Young phoebes sometimes become entangled in the horsehairs which are used in the lining of their nest."

    "He tells of the phoebe-bird that betrays her nest on the porch by trying to hide it with moss in a similar fashion in the way all phoebe-birds hide their nests when they are built among rocks."

    August 2, 2015

  • See swale.

    August 2, 2015

  • n. A valley or low place; a tract of low, and usually wet, land; a moor; a fen.
    v. To melt and waste away; to singe. See sweal.

    August 2, 2015

  • Gherao, meaning "encirclement," is a word originally from Hindi. It denotes a tactic used by labor activists and union leaders in India. Usually, a group of people would surround a politician or a government building until their demands are met, or answers given.

    August 2, 2015

  • An Italian gift box coffret circa 1400.

    August 2, 2015

  • See also posset-cup, posset-pot.

    August 2, 2015

  • English: coupling

    August 2, 2015

  • English: anyone

    August 2, 2015

  • n. An Italian coin, formerly one-twentieth of a lira. Plural: soldi.

    August 2, 2015

  • n. A bracket to support a balcony, a cornice, or the like.
    n. A projecting beam, truss, or bridge unsupported at the outer end; one which overhangs.

    August 2, 2015

  • A cantalever, console, corbel, or modillion, which has the form of a scroll of paper. See also cartouche.

    August 2, 2015

  • The point of royal administration
    Is hoarding the luck of relation,
    So many a fool
    Has ascended to rule
    By primogeniture and agnation.

    August 2, 2015

  • a yorkie/poodle mixed dog.

    from wikipedia "also called a yorkapoo or a yoodle"

    August 2, 2015

  • a pomeranian / husky dog mix.

    August 2, 2015

  • txt speak for a swear phrase.

    August 2, 2015

  • txt shortening of a swear phrase.

    August 2, 2015

  • Sounds to me like most waggy is describing something thats unstable

    August 2, 2015

  • This sounds like a paint product.
    I'd buy it!

    August 2, 2015

  • 2

    August 2, 2015

  • 1

    August 2, 2015

  • hello

    August 2, 2015

  • a smol octopus. Thanks for rotting my brain, Buzzfeed.

    August 2, 2015

  • When someone tweets "when will the word smol die", they just sealed the word's fate as being the new thing.

    small; tiny and cute;  or smile out loud

    August 2, 2015

  • A proposed Elecromagnetic Drive - a space thruster that uses electromagnetism. Also EmDrive EM Drive and EMDrive

    August 2, 2015

  • Way too many wineries to count now.

    August 1, 2015


  • Don't forget the wine cellar, she shouted from Walla Walla.

    August 1, 2015

  • cellary with peanut butter

    August 1, 2015

  • I am surprised this initialism does not already have an entry. It has been in use since the 1960s. Perhaps we are too humble a band. (Google "RPCV" for numerous links,)

    August 1, 2015

  • fuckerino

    August 1, 2015

  • I am sometimes moved by events to utter this exclamation, but it would make a good name for a subatomic particle.

    August 1, 2015

  • The name of an Egyptian King of Kings from a poem.

    August 1, 2015

  • From the usage examples it appears that the horse cavort is the most common meaning of this word but the splatterdash definition in The Century is one of those appealing preservations in amber. To celebrate the beginning of August I will honor both.

    For a pleasant equestrian ramble
    Select an old mare who will amble,
    So safely evade
    The sudden gambade
    Of a filly inclined to a gambol.

    In springtime provisions are made
    In gear for a fine promenade:
    To wade through the wash
    We deploy the galosh,
    Each shank tightly cased in gambade.

    August 1, 2015

  • A theoretically infinite word list, coined by Ian Stewart. 


    "The Hyperwebster lists every single possible word of any length formed from the 26 letters in the English alphabet."
    Vsauce video: https://youtu.be/s86-Z-CbaHA?t=9m31s
     Ian Stewart's book - https://books.google.ca/books?isbn=0192832026

    August 1, 2015

  • Okay, okay. I'll admit it--cellar door *is* beautiful.

    <3

    August 1, 2015

  • John!

    August 1, 2015

  • I would lijke top add the word 'meldge' ...would means mixing two or more things together (different colour paints or liquids for exampke ) to make a new colour or mix.

    August 1, 2015

  • Oh! And I take umbrage at the apparent lack of a cellar list--surely we'd like a nice spot for root cellar and storm cellar and that silly business about cellar door--right? I nominate bilbykins to make one for us. Just because.

    August 1, 2015

  • Gosh--it's been ages since we had a hilarious misunderstanding around here. Shall we commence with the phony umbrage taking? I'll start. First, as a nebraksan, I take umbrage at the notion that accents are somehow hip or cool. Why, around these parts, we pride ourselves on the notion that we make the most versatile newscasters because we have no accents. Ha! Second, I take umbrage at the notion that VM's humor is somehow impaired. Watch as I balance on this unicycle and toss fufluns toward the vendingmachine. Does it not spit quarters back at me? (Or those dreaded dollar coins that are impossible to feed into the coin slot on the city bus?) And last, but not least, I take umbrage at what I anticipate to be bilby's next comment--something along the lines of "take my wives... please." Sir, I take umbrage; not wives.

    August 1, 2015

  • VM seems to suffer from an impaired sense of humor. It may comfort him to insult some effigy of his prejudices to compensate but I do not appreciate being his target. This is a lexicographical site, not a therapy couch.

    August 1, 2015

  • Hmmm. I'm thinking of the catapaults in Age of Empires.
    Yes I'm that old.

    August 1, 2015

  • I let most of my wives speak how they want, except when they vex me.

    August 1, 2015

  • What's wrong with your wife maintaining her own regional vocabulary? I've never understood the smug attitude of people from the East Coast. Sorry for the rant, but I've had personal experiences with people from the East Coast putting down other American regional accents and vocabulary, Believe it or not, people from other areas of the country are quite satisfied with where they live, the words they've grown up using, and don't need to adopt East Coast regionalisms or shake pesky articles. What vocabulary of hers have you adopted unmockingly?

    August 1, 2015

  • I like uthappam. Also seen it as uthappa or uttappa.

    July 31, 2015

  • "Bargemen not in constant employ, who assist occasionally in towing. East." A Dictionary of Archaic & Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Volume 2

    July 31, 2015

  • See comments at down cellar.

    July 31, 2015

  • The definition for this expression is wrong. “Down cellar” does not mean “downstairs” it means “in the basement,” as affirmed by kraduate’s comment. It is a New England regionalism (note its inclusion in regional lists). I am a native New Englander but my wife is not. I have managed to move her from “in the basement” to “down in the cellar” to “down the cellar” but she cannot shake the pesky article. It sounds like it could be a survival from immigrants from Yorkshire. Unfortunately it is succumbing to the homogenization of American English.

    July 31, 2015

  • Thanks, TH for commenting on the word. I like it. No, I love it. And thanks, Zu for having the list.

    July 31, 2015

  • A term (I've seen mostly in gaming) for a weapon or character that has a lot of offense, but very little defense. Hard to defend against, but easy to defeat.

    July 31, 2015

  • My grandfather allowed how sarvis tastes like a fool, but with some lemon juice the berries make pretty good jelly.

    July 31, 2015

  • Reminds me of sarvis, aka serviceberry

    July 31, 2015

  • "Suller" is a dialectical term for "cellar," referring typically to an unfinished dugout space under a home or a detached root cellar, used for keeping food cool. "You'll find a jar o' sweet pickles an' some crab apple sauce down suller" > "down in the cellar.

    July 31, 2015

  • Which spelling do you prefer, bilby?

    July 31, 2015

  • FANG is a new acronym created by Jim Cramer on "Mad Money" for the four most important internet companies, Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Google.

    July 31, 2015

  • I taught a cooking class on uttapam earlier this year.
    *ahem* assisted by someone who knew what they were doing.

    July 31, 2015

  • See comments at cholmondeley.

    July 31, 2015

  • See also comments at drumly.

    July 31, 2015

  • I note with alarm and yet humbly
    It's perverse the way we say Cholmondeley.
    If there's no way of telling
    The sound from the spelling
    Then English is hopelessly drumly.

    See sionnach's amusing verses on this theme in comments at cholmondeley.

    July 31, 2015

  • i just want to find what is worknik

    July 31, 2015

  • See also uttapam.

    July 31, 2015

  • I'll say waggiest, but I refuse to say most waggy.

    July 31, 2015

  • slumry only loves eight words. This saddens me.

    July 31, 2015

  • I think it was the "We were filking last night until three in the morning."

    July 31, 2015

  • A pin or rod, typically of metal or wood, used on board ship and in mountaineering to secure a rope fastened around it. 

    Belaying pins were commonly used as improvised weapons on military and civilian ships, as their shape and weight made them a short but formidable club. See also belaying pin.

    July 31, 2015

  • Spotted in Vancouver ,the 2 is for '2 spirited'.

    July 31, 2015

  • *snigger*

    July 31, 2015

  • I guess it would be stop-loss rather than stoploss, if at all.

    July 31, 2015

  • What do you think about quitclaim, stoploss and maybe loosestrife


    July 31, 2015

  • Filk music is both a musical culture, genre, and community tied to science fiction/fantasy fandom and a type of fan labor. The genre has been active since the early 1950s and played primarily since the mid-1970s. The term (originally a typographical error) predates 1955.

    The word "filk" has also evolved as a verb, with two common meanings:

    1. To participate in a filk song circle, as in, "We were filking last night until three in the morning."
    2. To write a filk music parody of an existing song, as in, "I filked 'Hope Eyrie'." When used in this way, "filk" does not imply that all song parodies are considered filk music, nor does it imply that all filk songs are parodies. Setting satirical or parody lyrics to established tunes is not exclusively the province of science fiction fandom. Works of parody music such as those found in MAD Magazine or performed by Weird Al Yankovic have their own long-established traditions and history.

    July 31, 2015

  • See filk music.

    July 31, 2015

  • the 99%

    July 30, 2015

  • the great unwashed

    July 30, 2015

  • "A step; a rough measure of length employed by the Greeks and Macedonians when stadia were paced off, and not merely estimated by shouting."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    July 30, 2015

  • From the Century:

    "n. A place into which dirty water, etc., is thrown; a sink. Also jaw-box, jaw-foot.
    n. An opening in the ground; the entrance to a cave or cavern."

    July 30, 2015

  • Thanks TH and zu! Keep 'em coming!

    July 30, 2015

  • "n. A casting secured to the frame of a truck and forming a jaw for holding a journal box."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    July 30, 2015

  • "It was a cider house, with a heavy old-fashioned oaken press at the far end, one long wall lined with duckboard shelving for apples, the other with bunged casks and covered vats of freshly made cider."

    This context has nothing to do with mud.

    July 30, 2015

  • a floating hot tub - netherlands.
    also tug tub , TugTub , hot tug

    July 30, 2015

  • to make younger, or appear to look younger.

    July 30, 2015

  • Creasti is a contraction of 'creavisti' and means 'thou hast created' (2nd person singular, perfect active indicative of 'creare', to create)

    July 30, 2015

  • Creasti: this word is a contraction of 'creavisti' and means 'thou hast created'.

    July 30, 2015

  • "A tub boat was a type of unpowered cargo boat used on a number of the early English and German canals. The English boats were typically 6 m (19.7 ft) long and 2 m (6.6 ft) wide and generally carried 3 long tons (3.0 t; 3.4 short tons) to 5 long tons (5.1 t; 5.6 short tons) of cargo, though some extra deep ones could carry up to 8 long tons (8.1 t; 9.0 short tons). They are also called compartment boats or container boats."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tub_boat

    July 30, 2015

  • Thanks, VM! I especially like the dolly tub.
    And I'm a sucker for variations--it's fun to see how things change over time.

    July 30, 2015

  • mandible, mandibular, TMJ, lockjaw

    July 30, 2015

  • The waitress will bring the bill hither
    And cause our composure to wither.
    Not feeble abulia
    But crude dyscalculia
    Will force us to helplessly dither.

    July 30, 2015

  • "At North Shields, John William Atkinson, 20, a labourer belonging to Newcastle, was charged with breaking and entering on the 28th inst. a refreshment shop on the Grand Parade, Tynemouth, and stealing a quantity of cakes and chocolate, the property of Mr J.H. Graham, and also with breaking and entering on the same date another sweet shop on the Grand Parade, and stealing a silver watch and albert. He was remanded for eight days”.

    July 30, 2015

  • I am looking for my soul mate

    July 30, 2015

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