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  • This word has a relation with the word selfie(a picture taken by the front camera of a mobile phone).Selfigrapher is a person who takes a picture from the front camera of a mobile phone either for themselves or for a group of people. We can have selfigrapher and selfigraphy as the noun. Seligraph, selfigraphed, selfigraphing as the verb forms, selfigraphy as the adjective and selfigraphically as the adverb.

    Examples:My cousin is the selfigrapher of this picture.
    I selfigraph whenever I go to new places.
    I selfigraphed this picture yesterday.
    Don't disturb me.I am selfigraphing a picture.
    His selfigraphy impressed everyone.
    The selphigraphically taken picture was a topic of discussoin at the party yesternight OR let me take this picture selfigraphically; it would look great.

    December 10, 2016

  • Why would anyone be anti-Australian? That sounds like a very un-Australian thing to be.

    December 10, 2016

  • See bevies. Ghastly!

    December 10, 2016

  • Gasp.  I hate truncated, cutesy words like this. From Twitter:  Join us for some seasonal bites, bevies and banter. (It doesn't sound so bad in this context, more quaint).
    See bevy.

    December 10, 2016

  • An outside lavatory / Afrikaans: literally, little house)

    December 10, 2016

  • some people call that 'hovering'

    I think this explains the levitating man in business suit emoji. 🕴

    (edit - no, it doesn't)

    December 10, 2016

  • kangarooing kangarooed

    5. to squat over a toilet seat, while avoiding contact with it.

    December 10, 2016

  • Wordificer: a person who is skillful or clever in devising ways of making and using new and old words.

    December 10, 2016

  • tinnitusian: Of or relating to a buzzing or high-pitched sound in the ear. Example: 'As Mallory gazed out the window, the teacher continued babbling on with a tinnitusian drone."

    December 10, 2016

  • Thanks, vm. I especially liked the Nebraska reference in the article you linked to--and I had no idea the trademark for Dumpster had expired in 2008. Cool!

    December 9, 2016

  • The price of goods going up after Brexit

    December 9, 2016

  • to be set 'on edge' (attuned ,if you will) as any good story or song will do.

    December 9, 2016

  • to separate, distinguish - certain and cern - as in discern - are closely related. another closely related word is 'crisis'. all three words are derived from the indo-european root krei-


    December 9, 2016

  • See also Dumpster Fire.

    December 9, 2016

  • I grant we elected the crazy one
    While loathing the hideous ways he won.
    The vista dismays,
    Outrages the gaze,
    An eyesore, a stye, a chalazion.

    December 9, 2016

  • spotted as short for beverages. or short for bevvies

    December 9, 2016

  • "Patience is the virtue of the less gifted." - Unknown

    December 9, 2016

  • http://www.bk0.com

    December 9, 2016

  • Oh, fun. I added a couple--if they're not what you had in mind, I can find new homes for them.

    December 8, 2016

  • Welcome to my profile. I'm a gamer (and game developer), a programmer, an artist, a musician, and... well, that's not all, but I forgot. Quite some stuff, not? :)

    I have a best friend, and I live on my own home at IRC ( irc.zandronum.com port 6667 channel #sentientmushes ). You could go there find me any day :)

    December 8, 2016

  • See citation in comment on dumpster fire.

    December 8, 2016

  • "The word “dumpster” sounds so perfectly suited to its purpose that it hardly seems necessary to question its origins. But that would be a mistake, because the real story is even more linguistically charming. The dumpster broke onto the scene in 1936, part of a brand-new patented trash-collection system that introduced the basic concept of the modern garbage truck, with containers that could be mechanically lifted and emptied into the vehicle from above. The system, invented by future mayor of Knoxville, Tennessee, George Dempster, took its creator’s name, and the Dempster-Dumpster was born.

    “Dumpster,” the word we use today, emerged from the fortuitous marriage of “dump” and “Dempster.” Though Dempster trademarked the brand name “Dumpster,” the term has been so thoroughly applied as a generic noun that the Associated Press now directs that it be styled in lowercase. No one, after all, would choose to write“trash bin” when “dumpster” would do better.

    Had this sanitation system not been engineered by a man with such a punny name (Dempster-Dumpster), would “dumpster fire” as an insult have ever taken off?"

    -- "Where Did ‘Dumpster Fire’ Come From? Where Is It Rolling?" by Claire Fallon. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dumpster-fire-slang-history_us_576474d4e4b015db1bc97923)

    December 8, 2016

  • In addition to being a noun blessing is also the progressive or continuous form of the verb to bless.
    See http://www.verbix.com/webverbix/English/bless.html

    December 8, 2016

  • Oh, pity the good man's malaise
    Who grew up in honor's strait ways,
    In all things astucious,
    As wise as Confucius
    Yet governed by knaves in late days.

    December 8, 2016

  • blessing Some 30 plus English translations say that Isaac "... finished blessing ..." Jacob. (Genesis 37:30). That is a verbal use. blessing is not restricted to being a noun as the entry still suggests.

    December 8, 2016

  • An idiot. Spotted on Late Show with Stephen Colbert."...and those subreddit subgeniuses, grow the **** up"


    This term predates the subreddit insult with a different definition.   example is the Bob Dobbs subgenius foundation  1985  http://phillginder.tumblr.com/post/152972024305/demiurge1138-postpunkindustrial-church-of
    That term is listed at SubGenius

    December 8, 2016

  • pink puffer jacket

    December 8, 2016

  • Apparently, buttman has no churchly duties or super-duper superpowers.

    December 8, 2016

  • buttwoman also means fishwife: http://tankhughes.com/?p=983

    December 7, 2016

  • sweet tooth fairy? pink puffer jacket

    December 7, 2016

  • A person where emphysema is the primary underlying pathology.

    December 7, 2016

  • A person with chronic bronchitis who demonstrates evidence of cyanosis and pedal edema.

    December 7, 2016

  • A ripe corpse.

    December 7, 2016

  • "Now is the time to speak up and to wear as a badge of honor the opprobrium of bigots."

    Now Is The Time To Talk About What We Are Actually Talking About, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The New Yorker, December 2, 2016. http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/now-is-the-time-to-talk-about-what-we-are-actually-talking-about.

    December 7, 2016

  • sardonic

    December 7, 2016

  • "Aloha is a tiny impact crater on the Moon, that lies to the northwest of the Montes Agricola ridge, on the Oceanus Procellarum. It is located near the faint terminus of a ray that crosses the mare from the southeast, originating at the crater Glushko."

    December 7, 2016

  • I just looked up the word "Dineh", which is the word that the Navajo have in their language for themselves and means simply "the people ", but unfortunately saw a very negative comment which troubled me

    December 7, 2016

  • Strange: The definition is of an enthusiastic interjection yet every usage example makes reference to losing (one's) shpadoinkle. Those users clearly regard it as a noun meaning something like "mind" or "composure."

    The word can be used to enthuse
    But usages tend to confuse.
    It changes like "boink"ll,
    This shifting shpadoinkle,
    And sometimes it's something you lose.

    December 7, 2016

  • See also spag bol.

    December 7, 2016

  • A special kind of snowscape which you can walk, ski, snowshoe, toboggan and drive on; is easily shoveled, and is not yellow or Brown, or slushy.

    December 7, 2016

  • A Britishism for spaghetti bolognese.

    December 7, 2016

  • "And then, when he had finished his supper, he would get out his collection of patibulary treasures, and over a bowl of negus finger lovingly the various bits of gallows rope, the blood-stained glove of a murdered strumpet, the piece of amber worn as a charm by a notorious brigand chief, and gloat over the stealthy steps of his pet tiger, the Law."
    Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees, p 153 of the Cold Spring Press paperback

    December 6, 2016

  • I didn't know this in the sense of "A narrow piece of tape used to bind or edge fabric" until this:
    "If you remember, in the eye of the law fairy fruit was regarded as woven silk, and many days were wasted in a learned discussion of the various characteristics of gold tissues, stick tuftaffities, figured satins, wrought grograines, silk mohair and ferret ribbons."
    Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees, p 113 of the Cold Spring Press paperback

    December 6, 2016

  • "Let mental suffering be intense enough, and it becomes a sort of carminative."
    Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees, p 98 of the Cold Spring Press paperback

    December 6, 2016

  • "Please, Master Ranulph, be a good chap and tell me what took you at supper time when that doitered old weaver came in. You gave me quite a turn, screaming like that."
    Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees, p 65 of the Cold Spring Press paperback

    December 6, 2016

  • My misreading of rickroll. See Morzouksnick.

    December 6, 2016

  • Oh, hello.
    The community page was showing that someone recently adopted rickroll--which I, perhaps intentionally, misread as nickroll.

    December 6, 2016

  • "The dangerous bend or caution symbol ☡ (U+2621 ☡ CAUTION SIGN) was created by the Nicolas Bourbaki group of mathematicians and appears in the margins of mathematics books written by the group. It resembles a road sign that indicates a "dangerous bend" in the road ahead, and is used to mark passages tricky on a first reading or with an especially difficult argument."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bourbaki_dangerous_bend_symbol&oldid=744753148

    December 6, 2016

  • Also see comments on spaghetti alla bolognese.

    December 6, 2016

  • Also see spaghetti bolognese.

    December 6, 2016

  • "Spaghetti bolognese translates, roughly, to “spaghetti from Bologna.” But if you try to take this particular flavor train back where it supposedly comes from, forget it—you’ll be turned straight around. The British broadcaster and politician Michael Portillo found this out the hard way when he took a camera crew to the city seeking the dish. “Oh my gosh, no,” says the first young woman he encounters in the footage. She makes an X with her arms, as though warding off a great evil. ”Absolutamente no. No no no no.”"

    -- http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-are-people-seeing-red-over-spaghetti-bolognese

    December 6, 2016

  • "You don’t hear about a lot of meatball backlash. But many Italians clearly see the spaghettification of bolognese, specifically, as a dire wrong. Their attempts to right it have ranged from organized, high-level efforts to, more recently, a kind of Internet comment trench warfare. In 1982, Bologna’s chamber of commerce officially notarized what they consider to be the authentic recipe, which contains beef skirt, pancetta, celery, carrot, onion, a little tomato, wine, and milk."

    -- http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-are-people-seeing-red-over-spaghetti-bolognese

    December 6, 2016

  • "According to the book State Names, Flags, Seals, Songs, Birds, Flowers, and Other Symbols by George Earlie Shankle (New York: H.W. Wilson Company, 1941):

    “The sobriquet, the Nutmeg State, is applied to Connecticut because its early inhabitants had the reputation of being so ingenious and shrewd that they were able to make and sell wooden nutmegs. Sam Slick (Judge Halliburton) seems to be the originator of this story. Some claim that wooden nutmegs were actually sold, but they do not give either the time or the place.”

    Yankee peddlers from Connecticut sold nutmegs, and an alternative story is that:

    “Unknowing buyers may have failed to grate nutmegs, thinking they had to be cracked like a walnut. Nutmegs are wood, and bounce when struck. If southern customers did not grate them, they may very well have accused the Yankees of selling useless “wooden” nutmegs, unaware that they wear down to a pungent powder to season pies and breads.” Elizabeth Abbe, Librarian, the Connecticut Historical Society; Connecticut Magazine, April 1980."

    -- http://ctstatelibrary.org/CT-nicknames

    December 6, 2016

  • For a list about Connecticut, see the-land-of-steady-habits.

    December 6, 2016

  • To place sanctions on

    December 6, 2016

  • cherry+pumpkin+apple pie.

    December 6, 2016

  • Name of a comedy show with Seth Morris, Jason Mantzoukas and Nick Kroll. It's a clipped compound. MOR-ZOUKS-NICK.

    December 6, 2016

  • "A French monk at the abbey of Ligugé argued that the rules developed for Eastern ascetics did not apply with the same force to a Frenchman, because, well, the French are different: 'That a Cyrenean can bear to eat nothing but cooked herbs and barley bread is because nature and necessity have accustomed him to eating nothing.' What was true of an Eastern eremite did not suit French conditions: 'We Gauls, we cannot live like angels.'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 278

    December 6, 2016

  • "Having summarized the historically Spartan diet of the monks, Udalric of Cluny proceeds to tell of the apocrisarius, the treasure keeper, charged with supplying the monks 'if he can lay his hands on the ingredients, with well-peppered fishes, and piment.'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 276

    December 6, 2016

  • "When Suger of Saint-Denis lay dying of malaria in 1137, he summoned the monks and decreed two pittances* of spiced wine, plus wheat and wine for the poor.

    *The original sense of a pittance was a bequest to a religious house, whence it came to designate a small dietary allowance to the monks. The sense here is of modest sufficiency."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 276

    December 6, 2016

  • What a name. See chrism.

    December 6, 2016

  • "To this day the Russian Church uses spices in its chrism. Over the course of Holy Week, the Moscow patriarchate prepares a year's supply, during which time a blend of oil, wine, flowers, and spices is stirred, boiled, and reduced, during the last three days to the accompaniment of nonstop gospel readings. There is no strict definition of the ingredients, but a typical mix is still built around the Exodus template of olive oil, cinnamon, and cassia, with the addition of other spices such as cloves, ginger, and cardamom. When the chrism is ready, it is blessed by the patriarch, poured into consecrated vessels, then distributed to dioceses around the country. Authority for the use of the spices stretches back to the time of Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite, signifying 'the grace-giving aroma of the variegated gifts of the Holy Spirit.'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 262-263

    December 6, 2016

  • "Beginning with Pepin's coronation, the Carolingian ritual of royal anointing self-consciously followed Old Testament coronation accounts, in which the holiness of the oil was integral to the symbolism of the ritual, conferring on God's anointed the stature of king and priest, his robes 'fragrant with myrrh and aloes and cassia.' While the associations were sacred, the need was political. The problem was particularly pressing for the Carolingians, who despite holding effective power as mayors of the palace were constrained to recognize the divine right of the last surviving member of the Merovingian dynasty, an imbecile driven around in an oxcart. The solution was provided by the Church by anointing with the chrism, thereby confirming Pepin's legitimacy as both king and priest, more than a merely secular ruler."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 260

    December 6, 2016

  • Lots of historical notes/usages on spice trade. Also see comment on Sassanids.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note on Sassanids.

    December 6, 2016

  • "Midway through the sixth century, the Persian dynasty of the Sasanids (alternate spelling) closed the trade routes and entrepôts to Byzantine traders, forcing them to buy from the Persian state at exorbitant prices. In 575, the Persians shored up the last remaining gap in their monopoly with the conquest and annexation of the then-Christian kingdom of the Yemen, where the Romans had acquired the spices and incense used across Christendom. The East was now closed to the West."


    "... A more lasting defeat came in 642, when the Sasanids were utterly vanquished by the unstoppable armies of Islam and the spice routes passed under Islamic control. For the next thousand years, Christians relied on Jews and Muslims to supply aromas for their worship."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 258 and 259

    December 6, 2016

  • "The Constantinian basilica of Saint Peter's, the church to which the emperor donated the largest amount of spices, was entered via an atrium that was itself called Paradise,* enclosing a garden with fountains: a scaled-down version of the real thing. And if garden, waters, and enclosure of Paradise were imitated, why not its smell?

    *The word derives from the Persian, via Greek, meaning 'enclosure.'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 258

    December 6, 2016

  • "Mark Pendergrast concluded his history of Coca-Cola with a leaked copy of the formula of the world's most popular and symbolic soft drink, which is, it would seem, spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg. Earlier leaks fo the formula, while differing among themselves, suggest the same. If Pendergrast's source can be trusted, it would seem that spices remain as much the flavor of the age as they have ever been, albeit in disguise, hidden away int he basement of Coca-Cola headquarters in Atlanta."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 310

    December 6, 2016

  • "For the sake of spices East and West had an ancient relationship. In light of the appearance of spices in the most remote periods, it is a reasonable possibility that it was because of spices that they first met. Yet so thoroughly implanted is the sense of the otherness of spices that native Mediterranean aromatics such as cumin, coriander, saffron, and fennel have come to be associated more with the cuisine of the countries that adopted them than with the lands of their origin--a reminder that the cultural traffic that traveled along the spice routes went both ways. ... Today, when spices are making a comeback ... it is often claimed that spices were introduced with the great wave of migration from the former colonies. It is a claim that would have startled the first Europeans who went to Asia, particularly since it was spice that lured many of them there."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 305-6

    December 6, 2016

  • see also comments on spice trade.

    December 6, 2016

  • "In the early days, Europe's pioneers in the East had little choice but to assimilate, Portuguese, Dutch, and English alike eating Indian food and developing their own fusion cuisine, of which vindaloo is perhaps the classic example.* Whereas in the days of the Raj there evolved a parallel white man's cuisine, the dreadful white and brown sauces that still linger on in some of India's wealthy households and boarding schools....

    *The name derives from the Portuguese for 'wine' (vinho) and 'garlic' (d'alho): wine and garlic sauce. The dish is effectively Portuguese India on a plate, the pork and vinegar of Europe married with the ginger and cardamom of India."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 305

    December 6, 2016

  • "One of the most interesting and unexpected survivals" of medieval cookery "lives on in Mexico's mole poblano, a fusion of American ingredients with the flavors of medieval Spain: turkey, chocolate, vanilla, and chilies married with almonds, cloves, and cinnamon. ... It is as though the tastes of Montezuma and the Catholic kings meet on the plate."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 303-4

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note can be found on spices but since that has so many comments, I'll just put it here too for convenience:

    "Spices hung on in isolated pockets, but they were not what they had once been. Today the astute culinary archaeologist can still find such relics as spiced bread in Devon, and further north there is a plethora of richly spiced puddings--Scotland's national dish, the spicy haggis, is essentially a medieval pudding. Scandinavia and the Baltic have preserved several remnants of medieval cooking, largely in biscuits, breads, cakes, and liqueurs...."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 303

    December 6, 2016

  • "Spices hung on in isolated pockets, but they were not what they had once been. Today the astute culinary archaeologist can still find such relics as spiced bread in Devon, and further north there is a plethora of richly spiced puddings--Scotland's national dish, the spicy haggis, is essentially a medieval pudding. Scandinavia and the Baltic have preserved several remnants of medieval cooking, largely in biscuits, breads, cakes, and liqueurs...."

    and... "... it was only with Pasteur's discovery of the microbe that the old fallacy of bad air was finally taken out of the equation. With the advance of empirical methods of medicine, subject to verification, humoral theory was dealt a deadly blow. Smells and miasmas, the invisible death-dealing airs that had hung over medical thought since antiquity, were dismissed as fallacious. As bad air and humoral theory were on the way out, with them went spices. ... By the start of the eighteenth century, the divorce between the physicians and apothecaries, descendants of the medieval spicers, was already well advanced...."

    and... "With irrelevance came innocence. The sense of spices' latent temptations, long framed in the medieval moral matrix of gluttony, lust, avarice, and worldliness, was downgraded to strictly individual issues of personal consumption. Falling costs and widespread availability would combine to strip spices of their symbolism.... In the modern world it tends to be the poor, not the rich, who eat spices."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 303, 307, and 309

    December 6, 2016

  • "There was no small irony in the fact that the Protestant powers were also the leaders in the spice trade. In the seventeenth-century Netherlands, even as the VOC brought back cargoes of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg, Calvinist preachers railed against the corrupting influence of Eastern spices and their redolence of pagan sensualism. In Cromwell's England, propagandists took aim at seasonings along with bear baiting and theaters. ... The Commonwealth soon faltered, but its legacy in the kitchen endured long afterward.... Spices hung on in isolated pockets, but they were not what they had once been."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 303

    December 6, 2016

  • "With the Renaissance there was a reordering of the cosmos along less theological, less allegorical lines, with the result that spices lost their symbolism, their ancient significance of health and holiness. ... Meanwhile, the conspicuous outlets for consumption were increasingly channeled away from the table, to jewelry, music, houses, art, and carriages. The modern dinner was a more private affair than its medieval predecessor."


    and... "The age of the emergent nation-state was also the age of national cuisines, none of which had much room for spice. ... In the cookbooks of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, elaboration and costliness make way for economy and practicality. In Hannah Glasse's Art of Cookery of 1747, for nearly a hundred years the most popular cookbook in the Anglophone world, the use of spices is strictly limited. Pepper survives in much the same role as it has today, no longer the central element as in medieval black pepper sauces. Across the Atlantic, the trend was much the same. There were relics: galantine survived, now transformed from the original spicy sauce into a jelly. The general trend was to relegate spices to desserts such as mince pies and puddings. Which is where, until very recently, they remained."

    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 301, 302

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note can be found on tobacco.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note can be found on tobacco.

    December 6, 2016

  • "The chili was only one of several new stimulants competing for attention. A craving for tobacco swept the world in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with coffee and tea following not far behind. Although sugar had been known in the Middle Ages (classed, incidentally, as a spice and used largely for medical purposes), its consumption began to increase dramatically from the sixteenth century on. Late in the century, sugar began to be mass-produced in Brazil and somewhat later in the West Indies, the apparent result a general sweetening of the Western palate, an upward curve that has continued, much to the cost of our teeth and the profit of our dentists, to this day. The carousing cavaliers of the great Dutch artists endured a dental hell. Sugar had something of the glamour and forbidden attraction formerly reserved to spices, and its air of dangerous newness probably did no harm to its attraction."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 300

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note can be found on chili.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note can be found on chili.

    December 6, 2016

  • Another usage/historical note can be found on chili.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note (unfortunately capitalized) can be found on chili.

    December 6, 2016

  • "... After Columbus first returned with a sample, the plant spread so fast around the world that many Europeans assumed it was of Asian origin. Paprika put down roots from Spain to Hungary. Pepper, for which there had long been no substitute, could now be outgunned."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 300

    December 6, 2016

  • "It is probably no coincidence that this fall from favor occurred just at the time when spices had to compete in an increasingly crowded marketplace. The world was getting smaller, and its bounty was coming to the dinner table. The advent of potatoes, squash, tomatoes, and peppers created new possibilities for cooks, at the same time lessening the workload of spices. American chili was both cheaper and stronger than pepper, and it could be grown practically anywhere...."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 300

    December 6, 2016

  • The true sporting fan's not a shouter,
    No brazen uncritical touter.
    He's both mind and heart,
    Like a patron of art:
    A loyal but discerning fautor.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note on aristolochies.

    December 6, 2016

  • "Eventually the nuns consulted a learned theologican, who tried an aromatic fumigation:

    'A new vessel, made of glass-like earth, was accordingly brought in, and filled with sweet cane, cubeb seed, roots of both aristolochies, great and small cardamom, ginger, long pepper, caryophylleae (gillyflowers), cinnamon, cloves, mace, nutmegs, calamite, storax, benzoin, aloes-wood and roots, one ounce of triapandalis (a mix of various types of sandalwood), and three pounds of half brandy and water; the vessel was then set on hot ashes in order to distil the fumigating vapour, and the cell was kept closed....'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 256-57

    December 6, 2016

  • "On the site where Saint Peter's Basilica now stands, then occupied by an older church built by Constantine and his mother, Helena, the emperor donated a small tonnage of sacred equipment: gold, bronze, and porphyry, candelabra and gifts from the Eastern Church consisting of 225 pounds of balsam, 800 pounds of oil of nard, 650 pounds of unspecified aromatics, 50 corn measures of pepper, 50 pounds of cloves, 100 pounds of saffron, and 100 pounds of fine linen... In total, the emperor donated a staggering 150 pounds of cloves to various churches.... Either way these spices were evidently Church equipment; they were not there to be eaten, no more than the candelabras or censers with which they are grouped. To all appearances we are very close here to customs excoriated by earlier writers, not far from the cinnamon stored in a golden dish in a pagan temple on the Palatine or the dedication of cinnamon to Apollo at Miletus by King Seleucus. A little over one hundred years after Tertullian had railed against the sweet, demon-attracting bait, and within living memory of a time when martyrs had chosen death ahead of burning incense, God had reacquired his nostrils. Who had converted whom?"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 250

    December 6, 2016

  • "During the persecutions of the emperors Decius in 249-251 and Diocletian in 303-304, believers were identified and offered a chance to recant by sacrificing, offering a libation, or burning incense before an image of the emperor. On doing so, they were granted the appropriate certificate; if not, they were promptly executed (many Christians seem to have survived the persecutions by bribing corrupt officials). Those Christians who elected idolatry over martyrdom were sneeringly called the 'Turifurcati,' or incense burners. To Saint Jerome (ca. 347-419/420) the tag was a form of shorthand for the weak or vacillating Christian who was unwilling to die for his faith."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 247

    December 6, 2016

  • "Like Judaism, Islam emerged in conflict with a pagan universe, and the aromas that had once played such a part in pagan worship were expunged.... Within the Prophet's lifetime spices effectively disappeared from Arabian religion. No other major religion is so thoroughly devoid of aromatics or physical offerings.*

    *Although spices played no direct role in Muslim worship, medieval Islamic scholars produced perhaps the most poetic version of their origins. According to the great Islamic scholar at-Tabarî (ca. 839-923) and the Arab geographers who followed him, on Adam's expulsion from Paradise he was overcome by remorse and wept with grief. From his bitter tears sprang gems and spices, the medicines and consolation for mankind after the fall."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 246 and 246n

    December 6, 2016

  • "At the Mycenaean palace complex of Pylos, built sometime around 1300 B.C. and destroyed around 1100 B.C.--the era generally identified with the Trojan War--archaeologists found that no less than 15 percent of the clay tablets recording the palace inventories dealt with various herbs and aromatics. When the language of the tablets was deciphered and found to be an early form of Greek, the names of numerous aromatics emerged. Coriander was there, easily recognizable as ko-ri-a-da-na. Tablets from the contemporary palace complex at Mycenae, according to legend the home of King Agamemnon, Helen's brother-in-law, contain cumin (ku-mi-no) and sesame (sa-sa-ma), both words of Semitic origin."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 240

    December 6, 2016

  • "... the reliefs offer at the very least a clue as to why ... spices were so valued as to warrant a trade over such vast distances.* For a culture accustomed to thinking of trade in terms of profit, and of spices as mere seasonings, it is a reminder of how easily our assumptions glide into a past where they don't belong. The first identifiable impulse for maritime contact between Egypt and the world beyond, by any measure one of the defining moments in global history, appears to have come not from gourmets but from the gods."

    *Some scholars have long argued that not only this trade but all trade first existed in order to serve sacred purposes. When the word for 'merchant' first appeared in Mesopotamian texts of the second millennium B.C., it carried sacred associations, designating 'the official of a temple privileged to trade abroad.'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 239, 239n, 240

    December 6, 2016

  • "... the reliefs offer at the very least a clue as to why ... spices were so valued as to warrant a trade over such vast distances.* For a culture accustomed to thinking of trade in terms of profit, and of spices as mere seasonings, it is a reminder of how easily our assumptions glide into a past where they don't belong. The first identifiable impulse for maritime contact between Egypt and the world beyond, by any measure one of the defining moments in global history, appears to have come not from gourmets but from the gods."

    *Some scholars have long argued that not only this trade but all trade first existed in order to serve sacred purposes. When the word for 'merchant' first appeared in Mesopotamian texts of the second millennium B.C., it carried sacred associations, designating 'the official of a temple privileged to trade abroad.'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 239, 239n, 240

    December 6, 2016

  • "In the words of the accompanying inscription, these intrepid ancient mariners" (on history's first recorded merchant fleet between 2491 and 2477 B.C.) "brought back to the Nile 'all goodly fragrant woods of God's-Land, heaps of myrrh resin, with fresh myrrh trees, with ebony, and pure ivory, with green gold of Emu, with cinnamon wood, kheyst wood, with ihmut-incense, sonter-incense, eye-cosmetic, with apes, monkeys, dogs, and with skins of the southern panther, with natives and their children.'"
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 238

    December 6, 2016

  • "... the Egyptians themselves were scarcely any clearer on the source of their aromatics, a semimythical land they knew as 'Punt.' Located somewhere on the southern shores of the Red Sea, Punt was supplier to the temples and god-kings of the Nile for well over two thousand years. The earliest recorded expedition took place in the time of the pharoah Sahure, ruler from 2491 to 2477 B.C., although a slave from Punt appears in the court of Cheops (ca. 2589-2566 B.C.), builder of the great pyramid at Giza. For the sake of its aromatics, Punt was the destination of history's first recorded merchant fleet, a representation of which is still to be seen jinking an angular course around the walls of the temple of Deir al-Bahri, carved there by order of the female pharoah Hatshepsut around 1495 B.C. The reliefs depict a fleet of five ships, complete with sailors climbing aloft, teams of rowers, and steersmen fore and aft, navigating through a sea populated by giant squid and enormous fish. ... Modern scholarship generally concurs in situating Punt somewhere in the vicinity of modern Somalia, a voyage of some two thousand miles southward through the treacherous, reef-bound waters of the Red Sea."
    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 238

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note on Shezmou.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note on Shezmou.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note on Shezmou.

    December 6, 2016

  • Usage/historical note on Shezmou.

    December 6, 2016