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  • Trusted, Energetic, Unique.. TEU Real Estate Corporation

    http://www.teurealestate.com/

    January 23, 2019

  • https://www.elitedaily.com/wellness/swolemate-exercising-bae-soulmate/1382005

    Nowadays, it's very common to see romantic partners work out together. One of the more popular terms you will see is “swolemates,” which is a catchy phrase used to define two partners in a relationship who are maintaining a life of being healthy and fit together.

    January 23, 2019

  • Hi, Sarra! You may be interested to know that I, with the help of a friend, arrived at the phrase convergent homonym independently of you, yesterday evening, 21.1.19, and additionally coined the phrase 'disparate homonym' (sounds a bit like 'Desperate Dan,' doesn't it?) for homonyms seemingly unrelated in meaning to each other, while noting that there is also a grey area (see e.g., *check* mate).

    January 23, 2019

  • As Fortune’s wheel turns on its center

    The wise need no circumferentor.

    Your rising has meant

    A fatal descent -

    Let cries of the crushed be your mentor.

    January 23, 2019

  • Thanks citizenbfk! The images do look odd ... we do pull from the Flickr API, based on text or tags associated with the image. Lots of things are 'reported on' so that's why we see the images we do. I guess people don't photograph their reports (or share their report photographs under an open license) as much as there are photographs featured *in* reports.

    January 22, 2019

  • A sharp tongue may silence a villain

    And rapier wit may well still him,

    But should doltish guise

    Be barbed by surprise

    Be sure that your sword bears a quillon.

    January 22, 2019

  • It’s sad that our welfare should hinge

    On pols who will cower and cringe

    And dread to lose face

    ‘Fore the almighty ‘base’

    That’s herded by Murdoch’s vile swinge.

    January 21, 2019

  • not really the Welsh word for microwave

    January 21, 2019

  • When photos were first added here it was algorithm pulling photos up from Flickr depending on how they'd been tagged. I have no idea how it works these days.

    January 20, 2019

  • The gentlemen dodged Philomena

    (As you would if ever you’d seen her).

    They never could trust her:

    That ersatz nut buster

    Was famed for her false, “Philopena!”

    January 20, 2019

  • Great page, as usual! -- But...um, strange pictures in the Visual section, must be a joke or a mistake. Offhand my personal first reaction to this word would be to think of a document being presented, or a 'report' being verbally given....so I would think of somethings like that for at least one of the visuals...😶

    January 20, 2019

  • People who live their whole lives close to where they were born, according to NPR's Says You!.

    January 19, 2019

  • The organ pipe in a cuckoo clock, according to NPR's Says You!.

    January 19, 2019

  • See also comments at subreption.

    January 19, 2019

  • Two years of news and reflection

    Regarding the Russian connection

    Has still not induced

    The foolish seduced

    To see any sign of subreption.

    See also comments at obreptitious.

    January 19, 2019

  • In a PBS series about 'The West,' there was an episode called Gold Fever,

    It quoted an etymology ABOUT THE NAME OF CALIFORNIA...

    etymology from Native Americans BUT I DOUBT, WONDER IF IT'S TRUE, OR A JOKE. It said: "Prospectors liked to say that the name "California," came from a combination of the Indian word kali, which meant "gold" and fornia, which meant, "wouldn't you like some?"

    This is my essential question about this phrase: did it come from Native Americans...or were Native Americans the first to use the phrase?

    info about this Gold Fever TV episode, at: https://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/program/episodes/three/goldfever.htm

    January 18, 2019

  • Hubert Howe Bancroft (May 5, 1832 – March 2, 1918) was an American historian and ethnologist

    Found this quote, from around 1890's by Hubert Howe Bancroft,(May 5, 1832 – March 2, 1918) was an American historian and ethnologist writing: "A frenzy seized my soul... Piles of gold rose up before me... castles of marble, thousands of slaves... myriads of fair virgins contending with each other for my love -- were among the fancies of my fevered imagination....In short, I had a very violent attack of the gold fever. "

    January 18, 2019

  • I discovered there was a TV series called: "Gold Fever" -- I wonder about the roots of the phrase; it's etymology --

    The TV series described as an "Adventure, Family, Reality-TV and had a lot of material about prospecting for gold, and some 'gold rush' stories.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1710911/

    January 18, 2019

  • chomp?

    January 18, 2019

  • The beasts have convened to debate:

    Should jackal or louse bear the weight,

    Or lizard take blame

    Sparing others the shame

    That Donald and they be connate.

    January 18, 2019

  • carburetor

    January 17, 2019

  • alogical?

    January 17, 2019

  • One weather chat characteristic

    Is rather a linguistic missed trick:

    Why rain dogs and cats

    Not pigeons and bats,

    A figure more aptly faunistic?

    January 17, 2019

  • No.

    January 17, 2019

  • *looks sideways at jean dimmock*

    January 17, 2019

  • Laurtal Yanni

    January 16, 2019

  • Mottled tarmac.

    January 16, 2019

  • Doomed cromlech

    January 16, 2019

  • Cy Twombly

    January 16, 2019

  • His voice and his pictures surround,

    Like a pair of assailants they pound.

    They stab and they wound

    And leave us in stound

    Then kick us when we’re on the ground.

    January 16, 2019

  • toum batch

    January 16, 2019

  • "A heavy low carriage mounted on three wheels, the forward wheel being pivoted to facilitate changes of direction: used for transporting cannon and ammunition within the galleries of permanent works."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 15, 2019

  • "The play between the spindle of the De Bange gas-cheek and its cavity in the breech-screw: it is expressed in decimal parts of an inch, and is measured by the difference between the diameters of the spindle and its cavity."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 15, 2019

  • Spotted as a form of doggo speak on twitter

    Also ducc

    January 15, 2019

  • Also see fomes.

    January 15, 2019

  • emetic ipecac

    January 15, 2019

  • textspeak for 'what do you mean'

    January 15, 2019

  • Could a name for “enforcer of law” be

    More cozy than plain British “bobby?”

    See “peeler” that was

    Supplanted because

    The cockneys considered it nobby.

    January 15, 2019

  • Thumb thwack

    January 15, 2019

  • bum tack

    January 15, 2019

  • rampant poppycock

    January 14, 2019

  • Montserrat Caballé.

    January 14, 2019

  • Carpal dog snot

    January 14, 2019

  • larval COM port

    January 14, 2019

  • Portal tomcat.

    January 14, 2019

  • Vorpal wombat

    January 14, 2019

  • Mortal Compote

    January 14, 2019

  • Forsooth.

    January 14, 2019

  • I’ve rhymed my long weary way

    Five years without missing a day.

    Now rest on nostalgia

    Or choose cephalalgia,

    The price the obsessive must pay?

    January 14, 2019

  • Strewth!

    January 14, 2019

  • Spotted as a marketing term for a computer desk setup for gaming

    Also, Star Wars

    January 14, 2019

  • "Then again she liked the idea of herself up in the air with her compound eyes, hovering, havering, gathering data."

    Crudo by Olivia Laing, p 10

    January 13, 2019

  • High sentiments can’t hide the truth

    That much of our lives is uncouth.

    We desperately muddle

    And struggle to huddle

    Like penguins in search of some lewth.

    January 13, 2019

  • Mortal tombac.

    January 12, 2019

  • ""We're not hurting anyone," Beth said, still rocking, but with a new composure, her lips wiped, her eyes miotic, blue."

    "Show Recent Some Love" by Sam Lipsyte, p 65 of the November 19, 2018 issues of the New Yorker

    January 12, 2019

  • Old Icelandic: To get a scratch, to get a slight wound

    January 12, 2019

  • Reality’s under attack,

    Each speech a stinging gob smack.

    His gilt is amazin’;

    It seems as if brazen

    But even his brass is tombac.

    January 12, 2019

  • snarky comment left under full stack

    January 12, 2019

  • full stack developer.

    In myth, it's someone who knows everything from the bare metal to the application level.

    January 12, 2019

  • gaming shortening for elimination

    January 12, 2019

  • gaming short version of eliminations

    January 12, 2019

  • Both cloud computing and fog computing provide storage, applications, and data to end-users. However, fog computing has a closer proximity to end-users and bigger geographical distribution.23

    Cloud Computing – the practice of using a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer.24 Cloud Computing can be a heavyweight and dense form of computing power.citation needed

    Fog computing – a term created by Cisco that refers to extending cloud computing to the edge of an enterprise's network. Also known as Edge Computing or fogging, fog computing facilitates the operation of compute, storage, and networking services between end devices and cloud computing data centers. While edge computing is typically referred to the location where services are instantiated, fog computing implies distribution of the communication, computation, and storage resources and services on or close to devices and systems in the control of end-users.2526 Fog computing is a medium weight and intermediate level of computing power27. Rather than a substitute, fog computing often serves as a complement to cloud computing.28

    Mist computing – a lightweight and rudimentarycitation needed form of computing power that resides directly within the network fabric at the extreme edge of the network fabric using microcomputers and microcontrollers to feed into Fog Computing nodes and potentially onward towards the Cloud Computing platforms.29

    National Institute of Standards and Technology in March, 2018 released a definition of the Fog computing adopting much of Cisco's commercial terminology as NIST Special Publication 500-325, Fog Computing Conceptual Model that defines Fog computing as an horizontal, physical or virtual resource paradigm that resides between smart end-devices and traditional cloud computing or data center. This paradigm supports vertically-isolated, latency-sensitive applications by providing ubiquitous, scalable, layered, federated, and distributed computing, storage, and network connectivity. Thus Fog Computing is most distinguished by distance from the Edge. Fog Computing is physically and functionally intermediate between Edge nodes and centralized Clouds. Much of the terminology is not defined including key architectural terms like "smart" and the distinction between Fog Computing from Edge Computing does not have generally agreed acceptance.

    Fog Computing, Wikipedia (visited Jan. 11, 2019

    Fog computing is a term for an alternative to cloud computing that puts some kinds of transactions and resources at the edge of a network, rather than establishing channels for cloud storage and utilization. Proponents of fog computing argue that it can reduce the need for bandwidth by not sending every bit of information over cloud channels, and instead aggregating it at certain access points, such as routers. This allows for a more strategic compilation of data that may not be needed in cloud storage right away, if at all. By using this kind of distributed strategy, project managers can lower costs and improve efficiencies.
    Fox Computing, Technopedia (visited Jan. 11, 2019)

    January 12, 2019

  • Femtocell, Wikipedia

    Femtocell, Technopedia

    January 12, 2019

  • In Glasgow, the underground is known as the 'clockwork orange.'

    https://visit-glasgow.info/history-and-people/glasgow%E2%80%99s-clockwork-orange/

    January 11, 2019

  • From cold northern seas to the Tasman,

    And islands perfumed with sweet jasmine,

    O’er endless bleak fetches

    The transported wretches

    Survived on slim hope and coarse maslin.

    January 11, 2019

  • spotted again as restaurant reservations.

    The twitter examples also have it being a shortening of Resolutions (computer plus new year's)

    January 11, 2019

  • "Lenoks (otherwise known as Asiatic trout or Manchurian trout) are a genus, Brachymystax, of salmonid fishes native to rivers and lakes in Mongolia, Kazakhstan, wider Siberia (Russia), Northern China, and Korea."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lenok&oldid=853445221

    January 10, 2019

  • Dude.

    January 10, 2019

  • Anyone have a mellophone I can borrow?

    January 10, 2019

  • Seconded.

    January 10, 2019

  • An infant who’s fierce for the nipple

    Once grown may be given to tipple

    And if so accursed

    Must manage his thirst,

    Not guzzle but daintily sipple.

    January 10, 2019

  • Good idea ashok.

    January 10, 2019

  • Only for hobby

    January 10, 2019

  • re my previous comment: in the example from Dunham's book, the word amel seems to be used metaphorically, as a synonym for lustre, or sheen, rather than referring specifically to enamel.

    January 10, 2019

  • None of the examples given actually relate to the English word amel, so, here is a relevant example. "Swafurlam admired his sword and its splendid accoutrements, the curious richness of the workmanship, the yellow gloss of the gold, the blue amel of the steel, the straps of scarlet leather, and the buckle studded with precious stones."

    From: A History of Europe During the Middle Ages, Volume 2, Samuel Astley Dunham, 1833, page 319.

    January 10, 2019

  • That's cool, man. Pas de problemo.

    January 9, 2019

  • Sorry, due to government shutdown all visitors, limericks, cats and jazzbears must leave the park.

    January 9, 2019

  • I'm Brazilian and learning about api

    January 9, 2019

  • Though legal, leave pot well alone;

    It made my backyard Yellowstone.

    There Old Faithful spat

    And frightened the cat

    While a bear played a fine mellophone.

    January 9, 2019

  • Nope, not explaining.

    January 8, 2019

  • French: "as far as the eye can see"; within sightline

    January 8, 2019

  • There once was a youth in Australia

    Who slept in odd paraphernalia -

    Wore armor to bed,

    To cushion his head

    A pillow was stuffed in his galea.

    January 9, 2019

  • spotted as an old version electric car, or an electric car which is inefficient.

    January 8, 2019

  • Best use of nates so far in 2019.

    January 8, 2019

  • The Dutch have odd habits, by Jove!

    And sooterkin shows us a trove:

    Just why should Dutch ladies

    Be toasting their nates

    Or want to sit over a stove?

    January 7, 2019

  • In 2018, this was commonly used as the SHOUT 👏🏽 CLAP

    Where a phrase was to be read as if it were in all caps with a tempo.

    As in

    NEXT 👏🏽 YEAR 👏🏽 👏🏽 👏🏽 WILL 👏🏽 BE 👏🏽 EMOJI 👏🏽 OF 👏🏽 THE 👏🏽 YEAR

    January 6, 2019

  • corn-on-the-cob

    January 6, 2019

  • turkey

    January 6, 2019

  • Some credit strange creatures from space

    Or think that a ghost haunts the place

    But don’t often see

    The theophany

    Made plain in a babe’s smiling face.

    January 6, 2019

  • I originally subscribed to Wordnik quite a while ago, but for at least the past year and a half stopped receiving your Word of the Day transmissions, though I hadn't canceled my subscription. Any idea what happened? In any event, I am herewith re-establishing contact.

    January 5, 2019

  • The suffering drones who are seen least

    Will say that their boss is a mean beast

    But turns a fine fellow

    When workers grow mellow

    At the annual company beanfeast.

    January 5, 2019

  • The poets of old made a song

    With anvil and hammer and tong,

    Now rap’s all the rage

    That’s stamped by a swage

    So writers need never be strong.

    January 4, 2019

  • Coquitlam BC has a neighbourhood called Harbour Chines

    January 3, 2019

  • check out best and funny wifi names on https://funnywifi.name

    January 3, 2019

  • The barbering tar would opine,

    “The hardest to shave’s the jawline.

    The prow of the chin

    Is easy as sin

    But not the damned barnacled chine.”

    January 3, 2019