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  • All night fans in frenzy gave tongue -

    Gargantuan efforts of lung!

    Despite boastful songs

    The team failed its throngs,

    Who slouched sadly homeward, head-hung.

    June 25, 2017

  • spotted in news as a weather generated tsunami

    June 25, 2017

  • an air filter for marijuana smokers to exhale without stinking up the place.

    June 25, 2017

  • DICHTUNG means "Poetry" in German.

    June 24, 2017

  • Some think that the Donald's an odd man,

    But others, a sweet-natured Lord's man.

    I must give the nod

    To the party of odd;

    His piety reeks of the fraudsman.

    June 24, 2017

  • I think it refers to when something is 'brought into existence,' which makes sense when you say "He fathers-forth all things that shine."

    June 24, 2017

  • I don't know why. The 19th c. Had whiskey as part of frostbite treatment.  (google book search "whisky frostbite" 19th c.)

    June 23, 2017

  • See citation on pyrosome.

    June 23, 2017

  • "Each pyrosome is made up of individual zooids – small, multicellular organisms – linked together in a tunic to form a tube-like colony that is closed on one end. They are filter feeders and use cilia to draw plankton into their mucous filter."

    -- "Researchers probe explosion of pyrosomes off the Northwest Coast" (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/features/pyrosomes/index.cfm)

    June 23, 2017

  • I haven't had enough coffee for a limerick, so I'll default to haiku:

    qms plants seeds

    and encourages us to

    cultivate our own.

    June 23, 2017

  • While "nut job" and "loon" are dismissive

    Yet "mad" and "insane" echo fictive.

    The language amazes

    With terms for our crazes;

    It's supple and locodescriptive.

    June 23, 2017

  • ruzuzu and bilby combine

    Lamenting my poor withered vine,

    But if there's an ointment

    For cruel disappointment

    That comforting unction is mine.

    For limericks are careless of clime

    And ripen regardless of time.

    Their happiest chore

    Is spreading of spore

    To generate offspring in rhyme.

    June 23, 2017

  • emoji poetry

    most emoji poetry is non english

    June 23, 2017

  • Why a cocktail? Wouldn't jam make more sense?

    June 22, 2017

  • Chimps and fruit bats are picky.

    When it comes to their lunch, it's sticky.

    Why eat cheese or meat?

    Choose fruits or a beet.

    (But maybe not a durian--they're icky.)

    June 22, 2017

  • I was thinking something more like the university from Rocky and Bullwinkle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSVq7X7OPeQ

    June 22, 2017

  • Maghrirat is nothing but to get forgiven from the GOD i.e.ALLLAH

    June 22, 2017

  • kjdnq

    June 22, 2017

  • But what about fruit, mister qms?

    From bananas and grapes you digress

    I'll pop me a melon

    When breakfast desire is swellin'

    And laugh like a pineapple, more or less

    June 22, 2017

  • Rubbish, there must be something like 60 billion toes on the planet.

    June 22, 2017

  • The pattern is hard to ignore:

    Buy local and you are a locavore;

    If seeking cheap eats

    In veggies and meats

    You're frugal and known as a frugivore.

    June 22, 2017

  • This refers to the sourtoe drink which has a mummified toe.

    Fron the Guardian article:

    "For more than 40 years the Downtown hotel in Dawson City has served up the sourtoe cocktail, a shot of whisky with a blackened toe – nail and all – bobbing inside. Those who manage to touch the gnarled, severed toe to their lips earn a certificate.

    On Saturday a customer took it one step further, allegedly making off with the wrinkled digit after swallowing his drink. “We are furious,” said Terry Lee of the hotel. “Toes are very hard to come by.”"

    June 22, 2017

  • Ruzuzu, you need to meet Joe Dolce: https://youtu.be/9jwPqDVtsTU

    June 22, 2017

  • Wikipedia says kyphobic refers to a curvature of the spine past 45 degrees. The medical condition is called kyphosis.

    June 22, 2017

  • physics - "Other physicists figured out that this quantum state represented spin.

    And the up and down degrees of freedom with direction of pointing along the angular momentum axis. We now call these component waveforms spinors"

    June 22, 2017

  • https://twitter.com/Delafina777/status/877637588529561600

    (And that's for cis women--for society that has trouble remembering trans women, enbys, etc. exist, the HORROR that they would take the mic)

    June 21, 2017

  • Arrived here after getting liftman as a random word. What a nice list!

    June 21, 2017

  • Spotted as "no f'ing idea"

    Has nfi, had nfi. Or nfi as an adjective.

    June 21, 2017

  • What's a matta?

    June 21, 2017

  • Your lists are lovely.

    June 21, 2017

  • In Australia a half-job Harry.

    June 21, 2017

  • Expressions of disapprobation

    Have many a nasty mutation:

    The cold look that lingers,

    The wagging of fingers,

    But worst is the endless jobation.

    June 21, 2017

  • most of the examples point to the boat being called a gilnetter.

    June 21, 2017

  • LBD twitterspeak for 'little black dress'.

    June 21, 2017

  • See also ifrit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ifrit

    June 20, 2017

  • Also shankjob via Urban Dictionary: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=shankjob

    "A shankjob is someone who can't do anything correctly and/or does really shoddy work."

    June 20, 2017

  • Wiktionary: "One who fishes using a gillnet."

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/gillnetter

    June 20, 2017

  • Wikipedia suggests egule is of Manchurian origin and refers to a cloud of suspended water droplets.

    June 20, 2017

  • ""|Hélène| Grimaud doesn't sound like most pianists: she is a rubato artist, a reinventor of phrasings, a taker of chances. "A wrong note that is played out of élan, you hear it differently than one that is played out of fear," she says.""

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=H%C3%A9l%C3%A8ne_Grimaud&oldid=778559561

    June 20, 2017

  • A poet who's really astute

    Is neither obscure nor too cute.

    His work ought to dart

    Straight to the heart

    Not needing a shrewd hermeneut.

    June 20, 2017

  • See goodman.

    June 20, 2017

  • Nov 1st.

    June 20, 2017

  • spotted in 1787 as a Mr Thingamy

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=leo5AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA457&dq=Thingamy

    spotted again in 1851 as Mr. Thingamy along with Mr. So-and-so and Mr. Thing'embob

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=-MVNAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA305&dq="what%27s+his+name";

    and again in 1870 as Mr. What's-his-name Thingamy

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=sdFZAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA104&dq="what%27s+his+name";

    June 20, 2017

  • thanks.

    new words discovered are ihy, aftselakhis ,Meteorological Summer,

    burlesquercise , Malama Honua , cishet , ponv , resilient Thessaloniki , covfefe

    June 20, 2017

  • A Goodman is an old word meaning "owner of a house," or there about.

    June 20, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • The organ player typically has control over which of these supplementary pipes he wants to blow air through by pulling and pushing levers, or drawbars, that direct the flow of air. Knowing that clarinets have a lot of energy in the odd harmonics of the overtone series, a clever organ player could simulate the sound of a clarinet by manipulating drawbars in such a way as to recreate the overtone series of that instrument.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 48

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • If a musician is playing the white keys, how do I know if he is playing the A minor scale or the C major scale? The answer is that—entirely without our conscious awareness—our brains are keeping track of how many times particular notes are sounded, where they appear in terms of strong versus weak beats, and how long they last. A computational process in the brain makes an inference about the key we're in based on these properties. This is another example of something that most of us can do even without musical training, and what psychologist call declarative knowledge—the ability to talk about it . . . .
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 38

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The notion of relative pitch values is seen readily in the way that we speak. When you ask someone a question, your voice naturally rises in intonation at the end of the sentence, signaling that you are asking. . . . This is a convention in English (thought not in all languages—we have to learn it), and is known in linguistics as a prosodic cue.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 27

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • Sound waves impinge on the eardrums and pinnae (the fleshy parts of your ear), setting off a chain of mechanical and neurochemical events, the end product of which is an internal mental image we call pitch.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 24

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • The official definition of the Acoustical Society of America is that timbre is everything about a sound that is not loudness or pitch. So much for scientific precision!
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 19

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • What are words worth

    June 19, 2017

  • I've added it to my list.

    June 19, 2017

  • I'm fairly sure aftselakhis are things ruzuzu puts on an overhead projector in order to make interesting shapes, colours and patterns.

    June 19, 2017

  • This is great!

    June 19, 2017

  • Meditation is surely our true call,

    Let light that's inside us imbue all

    The mists that conceal

    Resolve and congeal

    And peace will descend like the dewfall.

    June 19, 2017

  • adagio

    June 19, 2017

  • Scrumptious

    June 19, 2017

  • ni ife

    June 19, 2017

  • Wiradjuri

    /wɪˈradʒuri/ (say wi'rahjoohree)

    noun 1. an Australian Aboriginal people of the area of the Murrumbidgee and Lachlan rivers in central NSW.

    2. the language of this people.

    –adjective 3. of or relating to this people or their language.

    Also, Wiradhuri.

    The Wiradjuri, traditionally occupying a large area of inland NSW, were one of the largest Indigenous peoples in both area and population. Systematic resistance to white settlement in the 1820s, under a leader known to the British as Windradyne, caused Governor Brisbane to declare martial law and to institute a military campaign against the Wiradjuri in the Bathurst area. The Anglican Church Missionary Society established a mission in the Wellington Valley in the 1830s; the annual reports of the mission commented on the deleterious effects of white settlement on the people.

    Rival spellings of Indigenous names are often due to mishearings by English speakers or their attempts to find ways to write unfamiliar sounds, but the two spellings of this name reflect a dialect distinction: northerners said Wiradhuri and southerners Wiradjuri. The name is based on wirray `no': that is, the Wiradjuri are the people who have the word wirray for `no', as opposed, for example, to the Kamilaroi, who use the word kamil for `no'. The English word billabong comes from Wiradjuri.

    June 19, 2017

  • ife ti ẹwa

    June 19, 2017

  • detachment

    /dəˈtætʃmənt/ (say duh'tachmuhnt)

    noun 1. the act of detaching.

    2. the condition of being detached.

    3. a state of aloofness, as from worldly affairs or from the concerns of others.

    4. freedom from prejudice or partiality.

    5. the act of sending out a detached force of troops or naval ships.

    6. something detached, as a number of troops separated from a main force for some special combat or other task.

    © Macquarie Dictionary Publishers, 2017

    June 19, 2017

  • attachment

    /əˈtætʃmənt/ (say uh'tachmuhnt)

    noun 1. the act of attaching.

    2. the state of being attached.

    3. affection that binds one to another person or to a thing; regard.

    4. that which attaches; a fastening or tie: the attachments of a pair of skis; the attachments of a harness.

    5. an adjunct or supplementary device: attachments to a vacuum cleaner.

    6.

    a. a document which accompanies a primary document, especially one providing additional information.

    b. an addendum to a text.

    c. a document, image, etc., attached to an email.

    7. Law

    a. arrest of a person, for contempt of court, by legal authority.

    b. the process of ordering someone (the garnishee) who owes money to a judgement debtor, to pay this money to the judgement creditor, in settlement of the judgement.

    June 19, 2017

  • St Edmund's College Boat Club (SECBC) is the boat club for members of St Edmund's College, Cambridge, a constituent college of the University of Cambridge.

    SECBC uses the Cambridge '99 RC boathouse for training and storing its boats. The club has two boats, 'Lily' a men's eight and 'Dotty' a women's eight.

    June 19, 2017

  • refers to the resilient city concept

    June 19, 2017

  • term goes back to 1848 or so.

    June July August

    I think I like Meteorological seasons over trying to remember the 21st or 22nd or so of the month for an astronomical season.


    More info at NOAA https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/news/meteorological-versus-astronomical-summer%E2%80%94what%E2%80%99s-difference

    June 19, 2017

  • Quick books search shows this showing up in 1997.

    allegedly yiddish for doing something to spite the rest of world.

    June 19, 2017

  • spotted on twitter "‘Malama Honua,’is defined as #CareForIslandEarth "

    term used in Hawaii ratifying the Paris Agreement

    June 19, 2017

  • spotted as cishetero or cis heterosexual

    June 19, 2017

  • textspeak for 'i hate you'

    in the usage, the writer doesn't actually hate the person.  It's said in a fun or jealous way.

    June 19, 2017

  • Collabracy coll-ab-racy “a state or society governed by the people through an open and collaborative political system”

    June 19, 2017

  • mispelling of despacito

    June 18, 2017

  • ... some buzzword businessspeak

    June 18, 2017

  • According to wikipedia this is a local historian of Athens.

    June 18, 2017

  • According to XKCD 1851 , just replace this word with magic

    June 18, 2017

  • Is google not a word?

    June 18, 2017

  • costed, guesstimate, and utilize, aren't mispronunciations, they're just words. ice tea is no worse than ice cream. heighth is older than height.

    June 18, 2017

  • Redbot :)

    June 18, 2017

  • As patience and rhyming time passes

    The evidence clearly amasses:

    If not quite deplorable

    At least it's ignorable.

    A word we don't need is ekphrasis.

    June 18, 2017

  • I concur. Check out the hummingbird images!

    June 18, 2017

  • orange IS the new black, after all.

    June 18, 2017

  • https://www.artofplay.com/collections/amusements/products/copper-begleri

    Break out your EDC ninja moves with this stylish brass Begleri. Inspired by traditional Greek worry beads, the Begleri is a popular skill toy that's kind of like nunchaku for your fingers.

    June 17, 2017

  • https://thefederalist.com/2017/06/16/trans-mainstreaming-blood-drinking-twerking-second-graders-will-ever-say-enough/

    Yesterday I learned a new word: sanguinarian. It’s as bad as it sounds, as I discovered in the secret vampire group, where 2,000 group members exchange resources for best ways to find willing human donors for their blood consumption and how to keep the habit a secret from their immediate circles who would never understand what it’s like to be an actual vampire. It’s an elevated life form, one that common folk could never understand. But still not hurting anyone…okay, well at least not without their consent. So what’s the problem?

    June 17, 2017

  • The hummingbird images associated with this descriptive bird adjective are worth the time to see them.

    June 17, 2017

  • gangrene?

    June 17, 2017

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