ry has adopted no words, looked up 0 words, created 74 lists, listed 13507 words, written 1193 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 33 words.

Comments by ry

  • this is quite fun but including the Century Dictionary entries for Middle English and Scots dialect forms seems a teensy bit unfair ;)

    April 23, 2020

  • this is fantastic. nould:nill::should:shall::would:will

    April 14, 2020

  • bilby has a comment on this word (bugs) that appears on the Community comment feed, but doesn't seem to appear on the word page itself! Hmm


    (edit) annnd now this comment is gone from the bugs word page as well. 

    April 14, 2020

  • I don't know why that would be needed, parolee is already ungendered

    April 10, 2020

  • I first misread the word and assumed it would be some allusion to enforcement of social distancing thru violence—fistancing

    April 2, 2020

  • Seeing this in real estate and architecture contexts to describe homes or buildings of exquisite, compactly intricate design

    April 1, 2020

  • journalists writing about pandemic are frustrated with not having enough alternatives for the word "amid" (or amidst)

    https://www.prdaily.com/during-the-covid-19-pandemic-buzzwords-are-getting-a-workout/

    As of writing this comment, each and every one of the Twitter citations at right refer to COVID-19 and use this word.

    unprecedented

    March 26, 2020

  • you might like anagram-poetry

    March 25, 2020

  • Hello fellow wordnik, just wanted to respond to your comment at Bebung—it may be that you can find what you're looking for at this page: bebung (not lowercase)

    March 25, 2020

  • hi reverseemf—Wordnik is case-sensitive. As suggested in the link under the Definitions heading, you can find some an entry at bebung.

    March 25, 2020

  • Twitter cites on this page are a litany—seems many businesses and installations have one of these right now.

    March 25, 2020

  • anyone else want to pretend this is all it means?

    March 25, 2020

  • I submit that "huggon" is the postulated elementary particle that establishes the force of a hug.

    appears that it also means something in Cebuano as well.

    March 24, 2020

  • got this from Random word link, & before I read the definition I was hoping for the postulated elementary particle that establishes the force of a hug.

    March 24, 2020

  • Also in non-apocalyptic times, often refers to gear required for job safety in construction and engineering: hi-vis vests and jackets in fluorescent colors, hard hats, safety glasses, boots, gloves, pads, hearing protection devices, etc.

    March 24, 2020

  • I feel personally attacked 😆

    March 23, 2020

  • https://i.imgur.com/oNObxMf.mp4

    March 9, 2020

  • time for a new fence?

    March 7, 2020

  • "rotational ambigrams" like this are all over the place but there are very very few "natural ambigrams" like poddollopsuns. Most ambigrams require some artistic trickery of lettering

    March 3, 2020

  • this might be what you are looking for: Barmecide

    March 3, 2020

  • natalie_portmanteaux I hate to play the part of prescriptivist fun police, but you might rephrase or include a disclaimer in your portmanteau comments to show they're gag etymologies...none of the recent commented words are really portmanteaux.

    February 29, 2020

  • that's not a real etymology of artichoke...

    February 29, 2020

  • That sounds amazing. I wonder if Amish youths could try it in rumspringa

    February 26, 2020

  • in usage, the generic epithet in binomial nomenclature (ie., the first term, the genus name) should be always capitalized including when referring to a genus without regard to a particular species

    February 24, 2020

  • These kinds of edge cases in well-formedness are always a kick.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_linguistic_example_sentences

    February 21, 2020

  • why...

    February 13, 2020

  • see comment at Plasticky

    February 13, 2020

  • Hi! you can usually find definitions for words by searching for the non-capitalized form (unless it is actually a proper name/noun). If you look at plasticky, you will find an existing definition there.

    February 13, 2020

  • the phrase vesicle uncoating in neurons just welded itself to the inside of my skull

    February 11, 2020

  • does your pink smoke machine have a lot of buttons that perform a mad panoply of functions?

    February 4, 2020

  • generally accepted as the opposite of embiggen

    February 4, 2020

  • I like that.

    I thought that there must be a Latin combining form that describes spasm or seizure, but all I found were more Greek forms: -lepsy and -plexy/-plegia. Darn

    January 31, 2020

  • this shit is a great anagram poem. It evokes a whole scene. "This shit" is those circumstances under which some long-suffering toiler—who's seen this oh so many times before—speaks the phrase, in a sour epithet of resignation to its particular and carking burdens.

    January 28, 2020

  • royale with cheese?

    January 27, 2020

  • Sounds dope. What is a lodging society?

    also how does Polish pronounce this? Is it kind of a rhyme with "mention"? stɛt͡ʃɪn?

    January 27, 2020

  • I think a lot of these pairs ended up on the anagram-poetry list.

    January 23, 2020

  • can Wordnik refresh Wiktionary sources? Over there they have an entry for this word as "Incorrect doctrine or opinions."

    January 23, 2020

  • Phrontistery and Luciferous Logolepsy both say this refers to horse meat/horseflesh. In French it is an adjective meaning equine.

    January 23, 2020

  • see comment at Sonderweg

    January 23, 2020

  • German, "special path". A theory in German historiography, a variously described supposed "special" path taken by Germany historically prior to 1945 (opposed to e.g. the democratic path of Western Europe and the autocracy of Eastern Europe), considered as a cause of latter German political structures and outcomes.

    January 23, 2020

  • Wikipedia says:

    Cintāmaṇi (Sanskrit), also spelled as Chintamani (or the Chintamani Stone), is a wish-fulfilling jewel within both Hindu and Buddhist traditions, said by some to be the equivalent of the philosopher's stone in Western alchemy.

    January 23, 2020

  • A miner or person who does tutwork

    January 23, 2020

  • Collins dictionary says this is a dialectical term in mining, referring to work for which payment is made at a fixed rate per increment of land/area.

    January 23, 2020

  • A phonetic spelling of the Japanese word for panties, used in various otaku and weeaboo subcultures.

    January 23, 2020

  • antiquated alternate transliteration for Songhai

    January 23, 2020

  • Name from the Hellenistic period for the Khorasan (q.v.) region of Western Asia.

    January 23, 2020

  • Pre-2004 this was a province of northeastern Iran, since dissolved into several smaller provinces, but in antiquity (from 6th century BCE) Khorasan referred to a much larger area comprising the east and north-east of the Persian Empire, its area today also including parts of Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan.

    January 23, 2020

  • compare speed bump, speed hump

    January 23, 2020

  • oh I don't know about that. If anything, its more hackneyed usage is as a colloquial hyperbolic reference to a period of expression of anger, with no real violence implied (see Twitter cites). While yes rampage is probably the frontrunner for instances of actual mass violence, nearly as often we see bloodbath, spree, massacre, slaughter, jag and others.

    January 23, 2020

  • feliciajeansteele, you sort of just did. I think the only way to actually do that would be to upload the image to Flickr yourself and tag it with the relevant term(s). But I have no idea how often Wordnik refreshes from the Flickr API

    January 21, 2020

  • it refers to being tricked, fooled, falling victim to some form of bait-and-switch. Derived from something involving a particular emoji (also called "jebaited") on the Twitch game-streaming site.

    January 21, 2020

  • MBARI = Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

    January 17, 2020

  • scateo/scatere in Latin is to "bubble, gush, spring forth" so it probably refers to springs in the hydrologic sense

    January 16, 2020

  • see Exocet

    January 15, 2020

  • It turns out the more usual spelling is ampassy for this usage.

    January 15, 2020

  • see comment at juco

    January 15, 2020

  • A colloquial contraction of junior college used primarily in sports-related contexts.

    January 15, 2020

  • There's mustelids but it seems to be only mustelids. Not mustelid-related terminology

    January 15, 2020

  • okay what

    January 14, 2020

  • I kind of agree, but I can't think of any alternative other than minipenis, only questionably an improvement.

    January 14, 2020

  • NASA has a really amazing satellite photo of this phenomenon:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasacommons/31289967363/

    January 9, 2020

  • This way of reciting the alphabet is wholly unfamiliar. I wonder where it is from.

    January 2, 2020

  • something weird going on here

    January 2, 2020

  • Three clicks on the random word link gave me this just now! Shana tova and HNY, everyone (Hebrew's Nice, Yeah)

    January 1, 2020

  • OCR errors arc my favorlte

    January 1, 2020

  • cursed crowfoot would go nicely with the last few terms added here.

    December 30, 2019

  • "turned digit three," used in modern duodecimal notation to represent the single-digit numeral 11.

    December 30, 2019

  • I like this more than acquisition or procurement

    December 30, 2019

  • I think sightline is the more frequent usage, which see.

    December 30, 2019

  • they may be interchangeable in one direction, at least: in the current twitter cites, a person claims to have made mashed potatoes with a muddler

    December 24, 2019

  • that does sound detrimental

    December 23, 2019

  • I have to hazard that this word is a frontrunner for the most highly-specific anatomical term in English.

    December 20, 2019

  • some other elements of this set:

    noble-mythical-words

    fairy-words

    illuminated-manuscript

    Treeseed's "faery dust" lists, found here

    December 20, 2019

  • a portmanteau of logo and portfolio that has come into vogue among graphic design service providers.

    Personally it's both annoying and interesting to come across a neologism that reads like a storied old loanword.

    December 20, 2019

  • who are these intermittent users who post a single non-sequitur and do nothing else afterward? Are you bots? I'm keeping a list.

    December 20, 2019

  • fake-words-meant-to-be-amusing is similar to this.

    December 20, 2019

  • (obsolete) a female sweetheart. An eponym/pojmanym (via Shakespeare) From the Latin feminine given name Dulcibella, from dulcis, sweet and bellus, beautiful.

    December 19, 2019

  • The goat-weed butterfly, anaea andria

    December 19, 2019

  • glitch here, the etymology appears but not the definition. Rix-baron was a title for a baron of the German Empire (ca 1870s - 1918).

    December 19, 2019

  • (obsolete) a rascal, scamp, rogue. In French it means something like "naughty" or "naughty child"

    Fun citations above.

    December 19, 2019

  • see comment at embateria

    December 19, 2019

  • Of, pertaining to, resembling, or affected by agrammatism

    December 19, 2019

  • A military song in ancient Sparta. The Spartan poet Tyrtaeus sometime in the 7th century BCE authored work(s) called "Embateria or Songs of the Battle-Charge which are also called Enoplia or Songs-under-Arms." Francis Gouldman's 1664 A Copious Dictionary in Three Parts defines embateria as "Certain songs to which armed men were wont to dance."

    December 19, 2019

  • I can't find this defined anywhere, but some googling is showing indications that it is rarely, and perhaps mistakenly, used as a synonym for everyday or commonplace.

    December 19, 2019

  • plural form of holoury; sexual exploits

    December 19, 2019

  • (archaic) fornication, debauchery. Mentioned in Erin McKean's 2006 Totally Weird and Wonderful Words alongside scortation and houghmagandy.

    cf. holour

    December 19, 2019

  • Drunk. Cited by Ben Franklin in ‘The Drinkers Dictionary,’ a column in the 6 January 1737 edition of his newspaper The Pennsylvania Gazette, giving 228 different phrases for being drunk.

    https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-02-02-0029

    December 19, 2019

  • According to Joseph P. Shipley's 1955 Dictionary of Early English, this describes "a propensity to break wind."

    December 19, 2019

  • Of or involving pernoctation; taking place throughout the span of a night.

    December 19, 2019

  • In Russian culture and politics, this refers to "compromising information"—damaging information about a public or commercial figure, used for negative publicity, or for blackmail. A shortening of a Russian phrase, (romanized as) komprometiruyushchy material.

    December 19, 2019

  • of or concerning hyle. see also hyletics.

    December 19, 2019

  • no unless surely

    December 17, 2019

  • Thank you, please check out our latest collection of funny wifi names

    December 5, 2019

  • an "asynchronous, symmetrically anonymized, moderated open-cry repute auction"

    December 3, 2019

  • blech

    December 3, 2019

  • blech

    December 2, 2019

  • I don't know...my grandma was known for decisively crushing all comers in Scrabble. One time I tied with her and it was one of the proudest moments of my adolescence

    November 27, 2019

  • I just re-read that book. I always thought the word was standard English, but oddly there's no entry on this site (at least) for excession

    November 20, 2019

  • you might like to pilfer from some of these: french--3, tricky-words-from-french, french-words-to-throw-around-next-time-you-feel-pretentious

    I really like empennage

    November 15, 2019

  • venomous reptiles, large carnivores, electric eels, hippopotamuses (don't @ me), etc. However I think pathogenic microorganisms are the hazardous lifeforms relevant to this context

    November 12, 2019

  • coolest

    November 12, 2019

  • it appears this list was rummaged through back in early october for Wordnik Words of the Day–wootz, hypertufa, gomesi, eprouvette, hygrodeik, manuport, grism, triblet girnel and others were consecutive WOTDs. i'm disproportionately proud.

    November 8, 2019

  • see choropleth map

    November 8, 2019

  • to commit to or take decisive action. Derived from similar expressions in automotive contexts.

    From definition-of.com:

    American English idiom: Bringing a pending act to fruition. Usually connotates an act which will have serious consequences. Also used in reference to quickly increasing speed in a car by manipulating a manual transmission gear shift (the "hammer").

    An answer on english.stackexchange.com:

    possible that ... "drop the hammer" evolved from "put the hammer down," a trucking term. Robert Chapman & Barbara Kipfer, Dictionary of American Slang, third edition (1995) has this entry for hammer down:

    hammer down, adv. phr. (truckers by 1960) Going full speed; with throttle to the floor; =wide open "...a herd of LA rednecks, all of 'em pie-eyed and hammer down"—Esquire

    From an answer on Quora:

    It's either hitting the gas very hard, or "dropping the clutch" at the beginning of a race.

    If drop the hammer = drop the clutch, it means releasing the clutch very quickly to start ("launch") the car quickly from a dead stop

    cf. lower the boom, hit the gas, give it the gunpull out all the stops

    November 8, 2019

  • Archaic European name for the Indian state of Odisha and of various kingdoms and/or cities that existed the area. orixa is also an alternate spelling for the orisha spirits of West Africa.

    November 1, 2019

  • to boil due to pressure differentials. See ebullism. Not to be confused with ebulliate/ebullient.

    November 1, 2019

  • see comment at Lemnian earth

    November 1, 2019

  • see lemnian. In antiquity Lemnian earth (lemnia sphragis) was an astringent for snakebites and wounds. The soil was dug ceremonially once a year near Hephaestia on the island of Lemnos.

    November 1, 2019

  • see also shode

    November 1, 2019

  • sundang, tanto

    October 31, 2019

  • I remember several from San Francisco (mostly closed years ago, but a lot of them retain their signage): Alhambra, Alexandria, Paragon, Vogue, Acme, Palacade, Lumiere, Coronet, Regency, El Rey, Pagoda, Granada, Embassy. We also have a Roxie.

    edit: found an internet list - there was also the Grand, the Amazon, the Tower, the Apollo, El Capitan, the Imperial...a Richelieu!

    October 31, 2019

  • you can place these comments directly on the word page for each one! Then, whenever someone looks up that word in the future, they can scroll down and see your comment/definition, even if the word otherwise has no entry.

    Example: see the comment I just posted at crumbledeed

    October 30, 2019

  • crumbledeed - breaking your word, such as a deed for property.

    ex. you owe someone money and you haven't paid them back, so the police come up to you and say "You're committing a crumbledeed."


    (see comments at user katiemagaw)

    October 30, 2019

  • I actually kinda want to know more about what a znes lens is.

    October 30, 2019

  • see het up

    October 30, 2019

  • slang, an imperative phrase. Advising the listener to slow down, calm down; to moderate excitement or agitation; consider consequences, look before you leap. Don't get in a tizzy or all het up.

    October 30, 2019

  • slow your roll there buddy

    October 30, 2019

  • Happily, this is a website and not an app so it shouldn't consume much in the way of device resources.

    However, it quite definitely is full of complete nonsense.

    October 25, 2019

  • HAHAHA

    haahaha

    ha

    hahaha

    cool

    October 22, 2019

  • do backbone, spine, and nerve fit? What about stones, balls, cojones? And why does this concept involve so many and various body parts?

    October 15, 2019

  • this is a term of art in apparel and product design and is more an industry-specific hyponym of variant or version than it is particularly related to color theory. In usage it refers almost exclusively to consumer product designs, often shoes, but also, e.g., wetsuits. 

    For example, a particular model of shoe may be available in three styles, each identical in construction except as regards the colors used: one in red and orange, another in green and white, and the last in black and gray. Each is a colorway. I can't think of another word that describes this. 

    October 15, 2019

  • is this satire?

    October 10, 2019

  • The Century definition reads like poetry

    The caul or apron of the intestines

    the great omentum

    a quadruplicature of the peritoneum

    hanging down in front of the intestines / from the stomach and transverse colon.

    October 9, 2019

  • ok

    October 9, 2019

  • I made interrogative-fictional-entities-Q6tTZP39vlra to resolve the wendigo issue and the Whos down in Whoville.

    September 24, 2019

  • whydah bird?

    September 19, 2019

  • cf. pet-rocks-and-carbon-footprints

    September 19, 2019

  • cf unwanted-matter

    September 19, 2019

  • khamaseen

    August 27, 2019

  • cf. bougie, bourgie

    August 26, 2019

  • lemming made me think of sheep and the satirical sheeple. Also, square was once in common use in this vein. Also normie itself would be a good addition to this list.

    August 22, 2019

  • first thought: aren't aborted and miscarried mutually exclusive?

    second thought: what the hell?

    August 17, 2019

  • isn't it usually spelled Cthulhu?

    August 9, 2019

  • A blend of tea and dinner, when you have a late tea with some food that usually take at dinner. Similar to brunch but in the afternoon evening.

    Suggested by manolito

    August 9, 2019

  • well, it does now. See teanner.


    You are welcome to add comments to any word page containing this kind of information, whether or not the word already exists.  

    August 9, 2019

  • i got thinking of this word again and went looking on Google Books. Found citations not entomological, but botanical. The Botanical Register, 1817, describes a gloxinia bloom (with a kind of poetry):

    Style white, ascendent, an inch long, tubular, bearded at the base : stigma hiant, broadest crossways, frosted within.

    another text, Principia Botanica: Or, Beginnings of Botany from 1960:

    ... in which the ovary remains hiant into the fruit stage ; and in early ontogeny many ovaries are hiant), and another genus already technically angiospermous by the ovary closing, and the style being already fully formed.

    August 9, 2019

  • In US/UK English "Kurdo" is usually rendered as Kurdish.

    For what it's worth, in about 5 minutes of Google Books/News searches and I can't find any examples of this usage of "gor." The only non-typo results in English in recent years are mostly references to Kenyan football club Gor Mahia.

    I'd guess that it's an extremely relaxed pronunciation of "according", spelled phonetically to capture the pronunciation. Assuming you saw this in print somewhere.

    August 2, 2019

  • Thanks for commenting! The entry for this word is included here: ctenoid—note that Wordnik is case-sensitive. 

    August 2, 2019

  • a phrase used in English-speaking areas of South Asia referring highly euphemistically to various forms of female-directed sexual harrassment or assault


    July 30, 2019

  • cf. obfusc, obfuscate

    July 30, 2019

  • cf. exhort

    July 29, 2019

  • Obs.; reference for this is Edward Lloyd's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895

    etymology it gives is from Anglo-Saxon a, on, + heahdhu, height.

    July 29, 2019

  • cf. qms

    July 27, 2019

  • Obsolete, a wax- or lard-based pomade for the hair.

    The name of this preparation, which is a compound of Greek and Latin, signifying “a friend to the hair,” was first introduced by Parisian perfumers; and a very good name it is, for Philocome is undoubtedly one of the best unguents for the hair that is made.

    from The Art of Perfumery, and Method of Obtaining the Odors of Plants, G.W. Septimus Piesse, 1857

    July 26, 2019

  • it is like listening for falling dew is my new favorite phrase of the week.

    July 26, 2019

  • defined at Metroidvania

    July 25, 2019

  • Also, apparently, sorcerperson

    July 24, 2019

  • see comments at magicaer

    July 24, 2019

  • Assassinesslessnesses are a scourge on modern culture. Measures are called for to expand the pipeline to increased assassiness presence across literally every sector of our society. Contact your representative.

    July 24, 2019

  • Aw, I wanted to see some examples of cool boi words

    July 24, 2019

  • I may need to write this out on a card and put it in my wallet for easy reference

    July 24, 2019

  • see comment at sha

    July 24, 2019

  • From a wikipedia article:

    In ancient Egyptian art, the Set animal, or sha, is the totemic animal of the god Set...Unlike other totemic animals, the Set animal is not easily identifiable in the modern animal world. Today, there is a general agreement among Egyptologists that it was never a real creature and existed only in ancient Egyptian imagination. In recent years, there have been many attempts by zoologists to find the Set animal in nature.

    July 23, 2019

  • interesting; some conceptual commonality with sha aka Set animal

    July 23, 2019

  • see also riffraff, scaff-raff, raffish

    July 21, 2019

  • cf. ill-wisher

    July 21, 2019

  • cf. well-wisher

    July 21, 2019

  • cf. wofare

    July 21, 2019

  • cf. welfare

    July 21, 2019

  • Per the Century, this is pronounced /pəˈɹækəpi/ i.e., rhymes more or less with catastrophe

    July 18, 2019

  • The Frontmatec butt puller offers a much better control of yield by producing shoulder butts with uniform fat cover.

    The advantages of the Automatic Butt Puller are:

    · Higher productivity–up to 1,500 butts per hour

    · Consistent product quality

    · Designed for easy sanitation and maintenance

    · Capacity to process left/right products with one machine

    · Safe use for operator

    https://www.frontmatec.com/en/pork-solutions/deboning-trimming/automatic-deboning-trimming/automatic-butt-puller

    July 8, 2019

  • Who was talking about Joy Harjo? Was it fbharjo? Today, Joy Harjo was appointed the US poet laureate by the Librarian of Congress and became the first Native American so appointed.

    https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-19-066/

    June 20, 2019

  • see also mage

    June 7, 2019

  • name of a chemical found in the skin of older people, and used in caregiving as shorthand for a distinctive "old people smell." Discussed in this article.

    Some people refer to it as “old-people smell,” ... often mistakenly attributed to poor hygiene, but it is actually an inescapable component of body odor that only manifests in older individuals. The official (and more respectful) term for the smell is nonenal...

    Found only in participants aged 40 and older, nonenal is a component of body odor that is produced when omega-7 unsaturated fatty acids on the skin are degraded through oxidation.

    April 20, 2019

  • eye-dialect spelling of a very relaxed pronunciation of "I don't know." Used as a text-speak abbreviation of same.

    April 10, 2019

  • *slaps knee* boy howdy ain't that a plum

    April 9, 2019

  • to wit, an abbreviation of motherfucking

    April 9, 2019

  • I want this to be the WOTD so qms will make a limerick with it and hopefully rhyme it with chainsaw.

    April 9, 2019

  • this sounds like a steampunk fantasy setting! Maybe this can help?

    March 18, 2019

  • chib

    December 28, 2018

  • see comment at tapetolucence

    December 24, 2018

  • a nonsense word similar to doohickey or thingamajig

    December 24, 2018

  • also this one

    November 15, 2018

  • where is that list of words that look like misspellings but aren't?

    November 15, 2018

  • a triple rhyme wotd limerick. what a time to be alive.

    September 14, 2018

  • cf. hiant

    August 3, 2018

  • There’s even a word to describe words that are exactly the right word for what you want to say – “teleolexical”. Why wouldn’t we want to give every word a chance to be someone’s teleolexical word?
    —Erin McKean

    June 12, 2018

  • There is a definition under antum. The consort of the sky god Anu in ancient Babylonian myth.

    June 12, 2018

  • pronounced tap-ROB-a-nee. Name used by the ancient Greeks, from the time of Alexander, to refer to the island of Sri Lanka.

    June 12, 2018

  • see Taprobane

    June 12, 2018

  • In ancient alchemy, a precious stone believed to cause the phoenix to renew its youth. Also referred to as the "slender stone." In the work of 13th-century minnesinger Wolfram von Eschenbach, the Lapis exilis is conflated with the Holy Grail.

    June 12, 2018

  • A member of various Russian free-thinking Christian sects.

    From Wikipedia:

    A Molokan (Russian: молокан, IPA:məlɐˈkan or молоканин, "dairy-eater") is a member of various Spiritual Christian sects that evolved from Eastern Christianity in the East Slavic lands...The term Molokan is an exonym used by their Orthodox neighbors; they tend to identify themselves as Spiritual Christians (духовные христиане, dukhovnye khristiane).

    June 12, 2018

  • from Wiktionary:

    Vis inertiae

    1. The resistance of matter, as when a body at rest is set in motion, or a body in motion is brought to rest, or has its motion changed, either in direction or in velocity.

    2. Inertness; inactivity.

    Usage notes

    Vis inertiae and inertia are not strictly synonymous. The former implies the resistance itself which is given, while the latter implies merely the property by which it is given.

    June 12, 2018

  • never thought I would like a piece of verse with the word 'moister' in it, but the conceit has now proven false.

    June 12, 2018

  • in medicine, refers to body parts that are minimally echogenic, reflecting less sound waves in ultrasound scanning.

    June 12, 2018

  • obsolete form of atrament. In ancient Rome, atramentum referred to various types of black coloring matter, such as writing ink or octopus ink.

    June 12, 2018

  • In music, "with bitterness;" "poignantly." Used as a musical direction

    June 11, 2018

  • see retrocausality

    June 11, 2018

  • PSA: I have been using this to tag "words" whose definitions that belong to other words entirely. Anyone else is of course welcome to do the same.

    There are also alexz's glitched-definitions and TankHughes' this-definition-is-wrong lists.

    Eyebeam is amusing.

    June 4, 2018

  • vingt-et-un

    June 2, 2018

  • sa‘d al-malik "Luck of the king". An equatorial star, Alpha Aquarii, a yellow supergiant.

    March 7, 2018

  • Arabic, "the Boat". Traditional name of Gamma Eridani, a southern star, a red giant.

    March 7, 2018

  • phrasal verb, to effect agonized crying or sobbing with such "ugly" displays as facial grimaces or spasm, flush, hyperventilation, rhinorrhea, etc. Merriam Webster did a blog post about it.

    January 19, 2018

  • andrias

    November 22, 2017

  • hard to believe it's been almost 5 years since the week that this list took over my life

    November 21, 2017

  • see squiff

    November 21, 2017

  • obsolete slang corruption of papier-mâché

    seen here

    November 20, 2017

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Comments for ry

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  • *brings out the tray full of fancy fufluns*

    November 10, 2015

  • Welcome back!

    *waves the banner*

    November 10, 2015

  • Hi everyone, by the way. How are you all?

    November 10, 2015

  • Though if you'd like more than one, you can add your ten thousandth, delete a word from an old list, add a new 10K-er etc.

    July 21, 2015

  • Once upon a time mollusque used to politely ask users what their 10K was. Perhaps he was noting them down on a dusty parchment scroll.

    July 21, 2015

  • Congratulations! You might see some fun stuff on myriad.

    July 20, 2015

  • Sort of an opportunity here

    any suggestions for what word I should list next?

    July 20, 2015

  • hi everyone!

    November 4, 2014

  • You're fun, and I'm glad you're here.

    March 27, 2014

  • Not guilty. I have a list of terms for being drunk. And that's the truth, Your Honour.

    March 12, 2014

  • Have you ever taken the GRE?

    May 11, 2013

  • Hello!

    May 8, 2013

  • i've fallen off the "top listers" sidebar. woe.

    March 13, 2013

  • duplicitous flibbertigibbet! declivitous vicissitudes indicate this's titty-twisting, innit?

    January 18, 2013

  • Thanks for the "evanid" suggestion, ry!

    December 31, 2012

  • I use >a href="URL">LINKTEXT and final < to make it work.

    December 28, 2012

  • Oh, q.v. is nice. I have entire lists devoted to some of those signals (my favorites are hence and see cut under).

    December 28, 2012

  • I like how traditional lexicographers used q.v. where wordniks use brackets.

    December 28, 2012

  • A general comment:

    Slang and Its Analogues, John S. Farmer ed., 1890

    is available at the Gutenberg pjt: http://archive.org/details/slangitsanalogue01farmuoft

    and it is enthralling—literally: I am now its thrall

    December 18, 2012

  • A general comment: "Random word" may be considered potentially NSFW.

    December 13, 2012

  • Welcome to Wordnik! Hope you're having fun--it's so nice to see that another user has discovered the incogitable randomness around here.

    December 5, 2012