ry has looked up 37443 words, created 70 lists, listed 10731 words, written 918 comments, added 331 tags, and loved 26 words.

Comments by ry

  • I haven't heard that. kablooey is common. I say splooey. Or "it asploded"

    January 20, 2016

  • from a deleted wikipedia article.
    http://gawker.com/the-10-best-articles-wikipedia-deleted-this-week-1749445064

    December 24, 2015

  • from Wikipedia:
    The man on the Clapham omnibus is a hypothetical reasonable person, used by the courts in English law where it is necessary to decide whether a party has acted as a reasonable person would — for example, in a civil action for negligence. The man on the Clapham omnibus is a reasonably educated and intelligent but nondescript person, against whom the defendant's conduct can be measured.

    November 19, 2015

  • see pænula

    November 13, 2015

  • shouldn't this be reverse spelunking?

    November 13, 2015

  • to put stickers on walls in public places as a form of street art, vandalism, or both

    November 12, 2015

  • chullo

    November 12, 2015

  • the consensus on urbandictionary is that this word refers to food, but after a cursory read through of Google search results, I conclude that it means whatever you want it to mean.

    November 12, 2015

  • see comment at yaeyaema

    November 12, 2015

  • this should go on those "words about words" type lists maintained by some wordniks

    November 12, 2015

  • a great fondness or paraphilia for thunder, lightning, and/or thunderstorms

    November 11, 2015

  • It doesn't have anything to do with FedEx?

    November 11, 2015

  • i don't know if I can adequately follow that madmouth, I have a motto of sorts that's apt here, "ry: paltry ribaldry"


    bilby—Worcester wastrel, that's all i got.

    November 11, 2015

  • that must be one of the top ten etymologies I have ever read.

    November 10, 2015

  • Hi everyone, by the way. How are you all?

    November 10, 2015

  • Or a county cumberer would be more alliterative. But you could also say maybe a borough burden. Or a burg blag? Or a local lackadaisical. a district drain. a parish pain point.

    Sorry. Suggesting any kind of simple wordplay to me is like waving a chew toy over your dog's head

    November 10, 2015

  • a commune in the south of France, population ~13,500. Legendary stomping ground of the tarasque in the 1st century CE.

    November 10, 2015

  • this is used to form any number of hyperbolic nonce words referring to a "climactic" level of enthusiasm for something.

    you can also paste this into google (I can't get href code to work with Google search url syntax): "a+*gasm"+-orgasm

    November 10, 2015

  • a sizing grade of arborio rice used in making risotto. The largest-grained varieties of arborio rice are termed superfino.

    November 10, 2015

  • weird, this word appears on Wiktionary but the Wiktionary entry does not appear here.

    Noun
    cumberer ‎(plural cumberers)
    Someone or something that cumbers

    November 10, 2015

  • archaic alternate spelling of schiedam, referring to gin.

    November 10, 2015

  • the "stack" of photographic images of the same subject, captured at different focal depths, used in focus stacking, a.k.a. z-stacking.

    November 10, 2015

  • see focus stacking

    I would guess this refers to the "z-axis" (i.e., depth) of the images used in this type of digital image processing

    November 10, 2015

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focus_stacking
    "Focus stacking (also known as focal plane merging and z-stacking or focus blending) is a digital image processing technique which combines multiple images taken at different focus distances to give a resulting image with a greater depth of field (DOF) than any of the individual source images."

    November 10, 2015

  • In French, this refers to the technique of "focus stacking" in digital image processing

    November 10, 2015

  • alternate rendering of piezo stage

    November 10, 2015

  • "A piezo stage can be defined as a mechanical device driven be a piezoelectric actuator, which provides one or more axis of motion. In the case of nanopositioning, a piezo stage makes use of flexure hinges where a moving platform is linked to a static base."

    whatever that means

    November 10, 2015

  • doesn't someone have a list of purely nominal locations?

    November 9, 2015

  • it keeps the malt in the vat.

    November 9, 2015

  • oh hmm I've been tagging such words under glitch definition for a while now. i will continue to do so, no reason we can't have a list *and* a tag

    November 9, 2015

  • Interesting word. All the citations above are from the Mahabharata. Various heroic figures in the story are repeatedly referred to as "car-warrior". Appears to be a translation of the Sanskrit ratha which literally refers to a chariot.


    Can't find an actual definition anywhere, but reading some passages, it looks like these characters are all chariot-mounted archers to whom are ascribed supernatural levels of martial prowess and general badassery. I think the chariots are flying in some cases. There are a lot of connotations I'm sure I'm missing.

    November 9, 2015

  • I can't figure out what language this is from, but as shown in the citation, it meant "black devil" in a central Indian dialect as of 1919.

    November 9, 2015

  • pickle (as in to be in a pickle–see Wiktionary definition #4) + predicament

    November 9, 2015

  • Alternate name for any of the Greek mythological figures called Asterion. Also a lesser known Greek Arian theologian of ancient Anatolia.

    November 9, 2015

  • Distinct from the anatomical asterion, this is the name of several Greek mythological figures, including two kings of Crete, a minotaur, and a river god.

    November 9, 2015

  • don't know why I had this on my list of stuff to look up, but for the record, it's French, a noun meaning shimmer or shimmering

    November 9, 2015

  • glitch definition. This is a French word meaning "detainees" or "inmates".

    Lovely archival flickr content here.

    November 9, 2015

  • archaic alternate spelling of vetiver

    November 9, 2015

  • from Webster's Revised Unabridged 1913: (Dyeing) stannous chloride, used as a mordant in dyeing and calico printing.


    could go on lists of dyes/pigments.

    November 9, 2015

  • this is great. I wonder if it is derived from gnarly?

    November 9, 2015

  • supposedly this is an italian word referring to the ring of liquid or condensation left on a surface by a beverage in a glass.
    (http://www.omgfacts.com/theworld/16419/20-Words-That-Mean-Nothing-In-English-But-Mean-So-Much-In-Other-Languages)

    November 3, 2015

  • I'm great in the living room, but I'll live in the great room.

    October 16, 2015

  • a type of illustration particular to the Wall Street Journal; a pen and ink head-and-shoulders portrait in a style mimicking the woodcuts used in early journalism.

    October 16, 2015

  • a small temple or shrine

    October 8, 2015

  • upset about how many times recently I've seen this word confused with pixilated. Otherwise reputable publishers in various media cannot seem to find proofreaders who know the difference.

    October 6, 2015

  • I nominate this for WOTD

    October 6, 2015

  • blue-sky thinking?

    October 6, 2015

  • also defined under moose knuckle

    October 6, 2015

  • I want to read this book

    October 6, 2015

  • Late one night at home i was writing down ideas for a thing about postcolonialism or something like that and fell asleep. i woke up in the wee hours and the last paragraph i'd written unmistakably narrated a dream sequence, in some version of my handwriting, shaky but legible. Something about the Minotaur and my brother and a cargo ship full of hay bales? don't remember. i couldn't remember any part of the actual experience, but it was observed on some level obviously. i think i still have the page somewhere. strange

    September 25, 2015

  • I don't know if it was already done between 2010 and now, but I have made a list of most listed words. I think schadenfreude continues to be the most listed word on this site.

    September 25, 2015

  • this reminds me of The Illustrated Guide to a Ph.D. from a few years back.

    September 18, 2015

  • this was my first favorite word. I remember being pretty small, reading it somewhere, looking it up and becoming very enthused

    September 1, 2015

  • I got this from "Random Word" a couple weeks ago and had the same thought.

    August 28, 2015

  • as in rhetoric(?)

    August 24, 2015

  • grrrl/riot grrrl

    August 20, 2015

  • I think there may have been an upswing in usage starting with this:
    http://metro.co.uk/2015/05/20/spunk-trumpet-and-10-other-rude-places-jokers-have-added-to-google-maps-5207192/

    August 18, 2015

  • I'm sure this is simply the newest variation on the theme of words like cum dumpster, douchecanoe, turd burglar, fucknugget etc.

    (sorry for the profanity, I'm a fan of creative swearing)

    August 18, 2015

  • a half-serious alternative to bitcoin
    http://coinmarketcap.com/

    August 14, 2015

  • I had that book.

    July 24, 2015

  • this is a shortened form of lying sack of shit, that i've heard younger folks use here and there in the last few years. "Don't listen to him, he's a lying sack," sort of thing.

    July 21, 2015

  • Then there's howling fantods and creeping horrors. I wonder if a fantod is anything like a meemie.
    I also thought of some others I am not sure really fit: spinning jennylying sack, Fallingwater, simmering hatred, stabbing pain

    July 21, 2015

  • like "that sounds too unsanitary," or "an unsanitary choice of words"? I've definitely not seen or heard such usage.

    July 21, 2015

  • The rock/jazz/funk band of long standing on The Muppet Show and in related film properties.
    Also a bar on Valencia Street in San Francisco, CA.

    July 21, 2015

  • this got some attention and so I was remiss in not mentioning that it's simply an anagram of Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem which is itself an amazing bit of verbiage

    July 21, 2015

  • to perform a u-ie, or U-turn

    July 21, 2015

  • oye vendingmachine, I took off a few of your additions bc this list is actually supposed to be phrases that included the word “the.” But of the ones I took off, most are now installed on phraseologue and phraseologue---confabular-locutions, so your efforts are far from in vain!

    But, I can't take off phrases that have apostrophes. if you see this can you take off beat one's brains out, blow one's top, break someone's heart, catch one's eye, and any others like that?

    not sure what to make of anasmkaa’s suggestion...

    July 21, 2015

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzuzuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Sort of an opportunity here

    any suggestions for what word I should list next?

    July 20, 2015

  • see comment at folk biology

    July 7, 2015

  • How people naturally classify and reason about the organic world, distinct from scientific biology.

    "Humans everywhere classify animals and plants into obvious species-like groups...."
    Folk biology (Wikipedia)

    "The term "folkbiology" refers to people's everyday understanding of the biological world—how they perceive, categorize, and reason about living kinds. The study of folkbiology not only sheds light on human nature, it may ultimately help us make the transition to a global economy without irreparably damaging the environment or destroying local cultures."
    Folkbiology (MIT Press)

    July 7, 2015

  • adult baptism (to oversimplify quite a bit), as opposed to pedobaptism


    July 7, 2015

  • the drinking of urine.
    (from urine + Greek posis, drinking)

    July 7, 2015

  • see uriposia

    July 7, 2015

  • wait so would media blasting be an umbrella term that includes shotblasting, sandblasting and bead blasting?

    I was just looking at a website that talks about this and they talk about blast media (as in, the media with which a surface is blasted) which is a super delightful phrase.

    July 7, 2015

  • five full fathoms (~30 feet) under water, i.e, drowned, probably.

    an English catchphrase, originally from The Tempest

    July 7, 2015

  • a man who adopts some part of the role of husband to a woman who is widowed, separated, or otherwise unable or unwilling to (re-)marry.

    And Laura waited long, and wept a little,
    And thought of wearing weeds, as well she might;
    She almost lost all appetite for victual,
    And could not sleep with ease along at night;
    She deem'd the window-frames and shutters brittle
    Against a daring House-breaker or Sprite,
    And so She thought it prudent to connect her.
    With a Vice-husband, chiefly to protect her.
    Byron, Beppo

    July 7, 2015

  • Archaic, a female troubadour or jongleur. Feminine of Old Provençal joglar.

    July 7, 2015

  • An anchialine pool or pond (pronounced "AN-key-ah-lin", from Greek ankhialos, "near the sea") is a landlocked body of water with a subterranean connection to the ocean.
    Anchialine pool

    July 7, 2015

  • Describing a spore in which the distal and proximal faces have dissimilar sculpturing and lacks tetrad mark. Example: Calobryum dentatum, Haplomitrium hookeri.
    Glossary of Pollen and Spore Terminology

    July 7, 2015

  • to treat a metal surface in order to clean or polish it, by continously impacting it with shot (round metallic, glass, or ceramic particles) impelled at high velocities by air pressure or other mechanism.
    cf. sandblast

    July 7, 2015

  • see shotblast

    July 7, 2015

  • thoughtlessness, blundering, absent-mindedness, or an instance thereof; a careless mistake

    July 7, 2015

  • one hundred. Usually in reference to US currency, i.e., a hundred dollars or a US$100 bill.

    July 7, 2015

  • markusloke — these are great...some of them I can't believe I missed.

    June 24, 2015

  • this noun usage of suck is also seen in the military catchphrase embrace the suck.

    May 26, 2015

  • a while back I worked at a meat+fish counter at a supermarket. One day a man with a distinct accent I could nevertheless place no more specifically than maybe South Asian, came and requested a cut of halibut. Cuts, rather: he wanted it coarsely diced. What he actually asked was that it be cut into "cubics" and repeated this word several times to ensure I understood. I always wondered if it was usage particular to some variant flavor of english, rather than a one-off malapropism

    April 30, 2015

  • see above in the Wiktionary entries:
    "intransitive v. To have the intended effect; operate or work: The skin graft took."

    March 3, 2015

  • see hell-for-leather

    March 2, 2015

  • see also mitrailleuse

    March 2, 2015

  • i would like to nominate this for WOTD as an excellent example of the kind of spectacularly deadpan output lexicography often produces

    March 2, 2015

  • *disapproves of the premise of this list while heartened at there being only one word on it*

    March 2, 2015

  • cf. me three

    March 2, 2015

  • the elusive "palindrome-anagram poem" (cf. loons snool).

    February 11, 2015

  • the usual noun form of chastise would be chastisement, alternately the gerund chastising. Chastice is not a word in modern English. Unless you decide it is, say, a name for the hook attached to a rooster's feet in cockfighting.

    February 4, 2015

  • leximation!

    January 29, 2015

  • one who oversees or presides over orgies. OED, I think

    January 29, 2015

  • A land of fufluns? One can dream. This is actually an archaic Etruscan/Latin name of an archaeologically significant region of Tuscany, today called Populonia.

    January 29, 2015

  • Ancient name of Etruria

    January 29, 2015

  • displaying or having concinnity

    January 29, 2015

  • high-speed watercraft, often of hydrofoil, hovercraft, or catamaran design

    January 29, 2015

  • LOL

    January 29, 2015

  • "a small stone or fragment of ore made smooth by the action of water running over it." (1907 New American Encyclopedic Dictionary)
    "Loose pieces of veinstuff lying about on the surface are known in Cornwall as shoad-stones; and shoading is the term given to the process of tracking them to the parent lode." (A Treatise on Ore and Stone Mining
    Clement le Neve Foster, 1905)

    January 29, 2015

  • is this a legit alternate spelling of metagrobolized?

    January 29, 2015

  • cf. blutterbunged, addlepated

    January 29, 2015

  • amazing!

    for reference, see sea elephant

    November 5, 2014

  • hi everyone!

    November 4, 2014

  • main-gauche

    September 21, 2014

  • hmm, similar to the popular (but strictly speaking, mis-) conception of the meaning of lion's share

    September 21, 2014

  • collective nouns specific to groups of animals. see comment at term of venery.

    September 12, 2014

  • per Wikipedia, the English tradition of specific collective nouns for different types of animal arose in the late Middle Ages and were originally referred to as "terms of venery".

    September 12, 2014

  • yo, I was just looking at Wikipedia re: collective nouns and found out a fun old name for collective nouns specific to animals: term of venery

    September 12, 2014

  • check out hairy eyeball

    September 12, 2014

  • imagine a first date where all these words were used, though.

    September 12, 2014

  • bilby, erin, belated thanks.

    September 12, 2014

  • reliable reddit. this is more like a cool 2004 word. not surprised it's in Wiktionary.

    September 5, 2014

  • Hi long time no see Wordniks!!
    Have you guys heard about this new dinosaur? Properly dreadnoughtus schrani, it's the “new” largest dino. I find the critter notable as much for the unwieldiness of its name as for its purported size.

    September 5, 2014

  • June 16, 2014

  • infra dig is actually far more common

    June 16, 2014

  • great, thanks

    June 16, 2014


  • June 16, 2014

  • to cover a large area and use a number of resources in searching for something; or to set a low threshold for selection or acceptance

    May 13, 2014

  • adorbs? (blech)

    May 12, 2014

  • recently described unusual purple mineral. from Australia, natch.
    http://www.popsci.com/article/science/unique-mineral-discovered-australia

    A previously unknown mineral has been discovered in a remote location in Western Australia. The mineral, named putnisite, appears purple and translucent, and contains strontium, calcium, chromium, sulphur, carbon, oxygen and hydrogen, a very unusual combination.
    While dozens of new minerals are discovered each year, it is rare to find one that is unrelated to already-known substances....
    It appears as tiny semi-cubic crystals and is often found within quartz. Putnisite is relatively soft, with a Mohs hardness of 1.5 to 2 (out of 10), comparable to gypsum, and brittle. It's unclear yet if the mineral could have any commercial applications.

    May 12, 2014

  • a humorous riff on the slang terms YOLO and swag (from Wiktionary: n. Style; fashionable appearance or manner), and the character Bilbo Baggins from The Hobbit

    May 8, 2014

  • I enjoyed this limerick very much.

    May 8, 2014

  • mamagoose26 commented on the user mamagoose26

    I looked up the word fever-bright. Although it has been used in plenty of places, there is no listed definition. I would say that fever-bright means "eyes radiant through a fever from illness, or excitement; frenzied."

    May 8, 2014

  • this kind of info is very welcome here! Normally you would place such a comment on the word's entry page. I'm copying your comment to the fever-bright entry, q.v.

    May 8, 2014

  • to fall on one's face, or to die.

    May 8, 2014

  • Not sure about that etymology, at least in regards to the vernacular salutation usage. I believe it's a contraction of "hey, yo"

    May 2, 2014

  • wanted to check this out. some googling shows this word was probably coined by Cynic philosopher Crates, in reference to his marriage; both husband and wife were of the Cynic school. So it sounds like he was simply saying it was a "marriage of dogs", or of dog-like people, in other words, of Cynics. I don't think he was trying to connote retrocopulation. "Marriage" is a stronger translation of the Greek γάμος—gamos—than "coupling" (indeed, the IE root *gem(e)- is supposed to be "to marry")

    May 2, 2014

  • does this really qualify as a retronym? I can't imagine there having been a time in human history when foster or adoptive parents weren't a thing.

    May 2, 2014

  • leveraging punch-out optionality would reduce synergy and damage my personal brand though.

    April 25, 2014

  • glitch definition. this definition belongs under recombinant DNA, I believe

    April 25, 2014

  • From Logolepsy:

    n. - (pl. -aux ) stained glass.
    Also, per earthmothercrafts.com's Bead Glossary, it "Refers to an iridescent coating or finish that is applied to only one part or one side of a bead."

    April 24, 2014

  • Spanish for lettuce

    April 24, 2014

  • see pad-eye

    April 24, 2014

  • obsolete/alternate spelling of ulikon/eulachon

    April 24, 2014

  • same as panacea. from Greek πάγχρηστος, panchrestos, “useful for everything”. Found on Wikipedia, and on Google books (Encyclopaedia Londinensis (vol. 18), John Wilkes, 1821, inter alia)

    April 24, 2014

  • alchemical term. According to Wikipedia,

    Yliaster is the term coined by Paracelsus which refers to "Prime matter, consisting of body and soul". It is most likely a portmanteau of the Greek hyle (matter) and Latin astrum (star). To Paracelsus, the iliaster represented the two basic compounds of the cosmos, matter representing "below", and the stars representing "above".
    ...
    In this sense, the iliaster is the same as the prima materia. It is the formless base of all matter which is the raw material for the alchemical Great Work.

    April 24, 2014

  • see yliaster

    April 24, 2014

  • the slang term is definitely a misspelling/mispronunciation of the word wretched. With that rendering has developed a somewhat more specific usage, at least on twitter, as some kind of derogatory term for women. see the Urbandictionary entry.

    April 24, 2014

  • I'm not sure the above etymology is correct. I always thought it was a Japanglish portmanteau of the emo from emoticon and -ji (meaning “characters”) on the model of the etymologies of romaji and kanjiquod vide.

    April 24, 2014

  • i've also seen this used in reference to the haters gonna hate meme, and also to connote enthusiasm to partake in some activity, as though in a mad dash towards it. it's technically an emoticon or emoji

    April 24, 2014

  • see also listicle(?)

    April 24, 2014

  • organ grinder?

    April 23, 2014

  • see comments at hindsighting

    April 23, 2014

  • onsite today with new client; heard hindsight repeatedly verbed; blech

    April 23, 2014

  • see butcherbird

    April 17, 2014

  • fiscal shrike?!

    April 17, 2014

  • wth, this is great. Trying to figure out what wood refers to in this context, and if it's the same as in wood-wroth

    April 17, 2014

  • I have a list like this one! — should be a word. Yours seem more plausible though. I might take a couple of them

    April 17, 2014

  • I like cat as a name for a cat. If you have more than one, cat 1, cat 2...
    I hope that doesn't sound mean spirited—i'm very much a dog person but i like cats.

    April 16, 2014

  • past tense of reny

    April 15, 2014

  • erinmckean / wordnik staff: can something be done about the glitchiness in lookups where an apostrophe is present in the word? Replace ' with ’ in all definitions and then also replace ' with ’ when search or word page urls are generated, similar to how the browser replaces space with %20? but actually no that's not server-side... hm (I hope it doesn't sound like i know what i'm talking about, b/c i don't). Anyway. It would be awesome if it were fixed.

    April 15, 2014

  • I wonder if wekau is somehow linguistically and/or cladistically related? Also, the Wordnet definition is boffo: "flightless New Zealand rail of thievish disposition..."

    April 15, 2014

  • I like that a lot.

    April 15, 2014

  • that article uses the phrase strip club terrorist act, which made my morning.

    April 15, 2014

  • saw this in an optometrist’s advert. Typo, malapropism, or insufferably gimmicky marketing-speak?

    April 15, 2014

  • I want to add acrobat, theremin, Segway, and t-shirt gun but I don't know if this list is open open or just sort of open.

    April 13, 2014

  • palindrome poetry(!?)

    April 11, 2014

  • check out loculus

    April 10, 2014

  • wow nice one, qms

    April 10, 2014

  • rimshot

    April 9, 2014

  • Does anyone know of a single word that means "member of the opposite sex"?

    April 9, 2014

  • another name for barchan dune

    April 9, 2014

  • if that's true, then you should know better than to spam-comment your links on sites like this—Google will ding you in results if it detects the pattern

    April 9, 2014

  • spam spam spam

    April 9, 2014

  • Hi sales! welcome

    April 9, 2014

  • see jenny haniver

    April 9, 2014

  • <blockquote>roylej commented on the user roylej
    I'd like to add the word 'adeptitude'.

    It's a noun meaning 'the ability to become proficient' or 'an innate skill or proficiency'

    It's been in use for a while. See examples here.

    April 9, 2014

  • hidey-hole?

    April 8, 2014

  • Tangiers’ angriest ingrates astringe granites, reasting rangiest ganister gantries.


    edit: yes i have no idea what that actually might mean

    April 8, 2014

  • see also vogon-anagram-poetry

    April 8, 2014

  • this list has gone from great to staggeringly awesome

    i can't quite express it

    April 8, 2014

  • same as iridaceous

    April 8, 2014

  • I still want a block under "Related Words" that lists other word entries where commenters have linked back to the entry page you're on.

    April 7, 2014

  • this is the funniest glitch definition i have found

    April 7, 2014

  • Canadian penny

    April 7, 2014

  • see Tu Er Ye

    April 4, 2014

  • A tutelary deity of Beijing, China. Depicted as a traditionally dressed anthropomorphic rabbit. Also transliterated Tu'er Ye and Tuer Ye; sometimes known as Gentleman Rabbit (in translation)

    April 4, 2014

  • (see anagram-poetry)

    April 3, 2014

  • it makes me think of an incomplete, particularly bizarre tabloid headline

    "BILBY GOT CHUB," TATTLES JILTED MISTRESS

    April 3, 2014

  • in re: potate as verb, I guess no official definition as such, but there is potator and compotator

    April 3, 2014

  • just want to say that I believe the limerick below was originally penned by Ogden Nash

    April 3, 2014

  • I liked this one

    April 3, 2014

  • tine, tres-tine?

    April 3, 2014

  • ce n’est pas une montagne


    ...anyway yes you caught me editing my comment. I just edited it again, so ha

    April 2, 2014

  • Blorenge or sometimes The Blorenge (/ˈblɒrɨndʒ/; WelshBlorens) is a prominent hill which overlooks the valley of the River Usk in Monmouthshiresoutheast WalesIt is situated in the southeastern corner of the Brecon Beacons National Park. The summit plateau reaches a height of 1,841 feet (561 m)

    April 2, 2014

  • A little late to the game, but how about Blorenge? I know, I know, kind of a stretch but I mean what else is there?

    April 2, 2014

  • RUZUZU YOU CAN PUT BACK ON
    (·_·)
    ( ·_·)>⌐■-■
    (⌐■_■)
    YOUR PANTS
    not correcting you bilby, but this is how it played out in my head

    April 2, 2014

  • I've come to accept that—and as I type this it dawns on me that it may be a natural law on the order of every potential list is an existing list—that an open list may at any moment evolve unpredictably as an emergent behavior arising from adventitious contributions. And pretty much all my lists are open. So that's fine. I guess I should ask if ruzuzu wants to put pants back

    April 1, 2014

  • I would imagine that's a different sense of the word, i.e. (malevolent) supernatural agency.
    umm...pants? as in pantaloons? as in St. Pantaleon?

    April 1, 2014

  • this definition goes not with sacrosancta but with biotic or the suffix -biotic

    April 1, 2014

  • yummmm

    April 1, 2014

  • cf. shitkicker

    March 31, 2014

  • something to do, perhaps, with the uncanny valley?

    March 31, 2014

Comments for ry

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  • *brings out the tray full of fancy fufluns*

    November 10, 2015

  • Welcome back!
    *waves the banner*

    November 10, 2015

  • Hi everyone, by the way. How are you all?

    November 10, 2015

  • Though if you'd like more than one, you can add your ten thousandth, delete a word from an old list, add a new 10K-er etc.

    July 21, 2015

  • Once upon a time mollusque used to politely ask users what their 10K was. Perhaps he was noting them down on a dusty parchment scroll.

    July 21, 2015

  • Congratulations! You might see some fun stuff on myriad.

    July 20, 2015

  • Sort of an opportunity here

    any suggestions for what word I should list next?

    July 20, 2015

  • hi everyone!

    November 4, 2014

  • You're fun, and I'm glad you're here.

    March 27, 2014

  • Not guilty. I have a list of terms for being drunk. And that's the truth, Your Honour.

    March 12, 2014

  • Have you ever taken the GRE?

    May 11, 2013

  • Hello!

    May 8, 2013

  • i've fallen off the "top listers" sidebar. woe.

    March 13, 2013

  • duplicitous flibbertigibbet! declivitous vicissitudes indicate this's titty-twisting, innit?

    January 18, 2013

  • Thanks for the "evanid" suggestion, ry!

    December 31, 2012

  • I use >a href="URL">LINKTEXT and final < to make it work.

    December 28, 2012

  • Oh, q.v. is nice. I have entire lists devoted to some of those signals (my favorites are hence and see cut under).

    December 28, 2012

  • I like how traditional lexicographers used q.v. where wordniks use brackets.

    December 28, 2012

  • A general comment:
    Slang and Its Analogues, John S. Farmer ed., 1890
    is available at the Gutenberg pjt: http://archive.org/details/slangitsanalogue01farmuoft
    and it is enthralling—literally: I am now its thrall

    December 18, 2012

  • A general comment: "Random word" may be considered potentially NSFW.

    December 13, 2012

  • Welcome to Wordnik! Hope you're having fun--it's so nice to see that another user has discovered the incogitable randomness around here.

    December 5, 2012