Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • preposition Surrounded by; amid.
  • adjective Middle; central.
  • adjective Being the part in the middle or center.
  • adjective Linguistics Of, relating to, or being a vowel produced with the tongue in a position approximately intermediate between high and low, as the vowel in but.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A midshipman. Also middy.
  • An abbreviation of amid, used in poetry.
  • noun An abbreviation of middle (voice).
  • Middle; being the middle part or midst.
  • Being between; intermediate; intervening: only in inseparable compounds: as, midrib, midriff, midwicket.
  • noun Middle; midst.
  • With: a preposition formerly in common use, but now entirely superseded by with. It remains only in the compound midwife.
  • noun A dialectal form of might.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete Middle.
  • preposition See amid.
  • adjective Denoting the middle part.
  • adjective Occupying a middle position; middle
  • adjective (Phon.) Made with a somewhat elevated position of some certain part of the tongue, in relation to the palate; midway between the high and the low; -- said of certain vowel sounds. See Guide to Pronunciation, §§ 10, 11.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun computing Mobile information device
  • adjective Denoting the middle part.
  • adjective Occupying a middle position; middle.
  • adjective linguistics Made with a somewhat elevated position of some certain part of the tongue, in relation to the palate; midway between the high and the low; said of certain vowel sounds; as, a (ale), / (/ll), / (/ld).
  • preposition obsolete With.
  • preposition Amid.
  • noun archaic middle

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective used in combination to denote the middle

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Alteration of amid.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English midd; see medhyo- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Old English mid ("with, in conjunction with, in company with, together with, into the presence of, through, by means of, by, among, in, at (time), in the sight of, opinion of", preposition), from Proto-Germanic *midi (“with”), from Proto-Indo-European *medʰi-, *meta (“with”). Cognate with North Frisian mits ("with"), Dutch met ("with"), German mit ("with"), Danish med ("with"), Icelandic með ("with"), Ancient Greek μετά (metá, "among, between, with"), Albanian me ("with, together"), Sanskrit  (smat, "together, at the same time").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English mid, midde, from Old English midd ("mid, middle, midway"), from Proto-Germanic *midjaz (“mid, middle”, adjective), from Proto-Indo-European *médʰyos (“between, in the middle, middle”). Cognate with Dutch mits ("provided that"), German mitte ("center, middle, mean"), Icelandic miðr ("middle", adjective), Latin medius ("middle, medium"). See also middle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Acronym. From "mobile information device".

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English mid, midde, from Old English midd ("midst, middle", noun), from Proto-Germanic *midjan, *medjōn, *midjô (“middle, center”) < *midjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *medhy- (“between, in the middle, middle”), *medʰyo-. Cognate with German Mitte ("center, middle, midst"), Danish midje ("middle"), Icelandic midja ("middle"). See also median, Latin medianus.

Examples

  • Þa ferde he mid micel færd into engle [la] nd. ⁊ wan castles. ⁊ te king ferde agenes hi {m} mid  {180} micel mare ferd. ⁊ þoþwæthere fuhtten hi noht. oc ferden þe ærceb {iscop} ⁊ te wise me ` n´ betwux heo {m}. ⁊ makede ð sahte ð te king sculde ben lauerd ⁊ king wile he liuede.

    Selections from early Middle English, 1130-1250 Part I: Texts

  • + Ne beo in hire naþing iwrat bute chirche bisocnie ⁊ beode to criste ⁊ eoten ⁊ dri {n} ken mid griðe ⁊ mid  {80} gledscipe.

    Selections from early Middle English, 1130-1250 Part I: Texts

  • The term mid-size terror bird sounds kind of bizarre at first, as though terror birds, whatever they might be, come in a range of sizes, all of them a bit scary - sort of like coffee options at Starbucks.

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  • One of the finest achievements occurred the other night with Celtic defying history and winning a UEFA Champions League tie against a well-oiled Russian team challenging for the title mid-way through their season.

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  • Although the term mid-cap may be a stretch for a company with a market cap of $8 billion, I don't think that Safeway is a large enough company to accurately be described as a large-cap.

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  • If you start looking at ISV-502, I use the term mid-margin diseases; blepharoconjunctivitis is a part of mid-margin disease.

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  • If you start looking at ISV-502, I use the term mid-margin diseases; blepharoconjunctivitis is a part of mid-margin disease.

    Biotech Sector and Stocks Analysis from Seeking Alpha

  • If you start looking at ISV-502, I use the term mid-margin diseases; blepharoconjunctivitis is a part of mid-margin disease.

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  • If you start looking at ISV-502, I use the term mid-margin diseases; blepharoconjunctivitis is a part of mid-margin disease.

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  • Instead he calls for the party to revive the spirit of what he calls the "mid nineties modernisers":For those mid nineties modernisers, making the party comfortable was never enough.

    Douglas Alexander delivers jolt to Tories as he says Labour can win

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