Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Music Variant of baritone.
  • n. Linguistics A word that has a heavy stress or pitch accent on its penultimate syllable.
  • adj. Linguistics Relating to or being a word that has a heavy stress or pitch accent on its penultimate syllable.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not having the acute accent on the final syllable of a word, especially with reference to Greek grammar
  • n. An alternative (and rare) form of baritone, a male voice or instrument with that range.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Grave and deep, as a kind of male voice.
  • adj. Not marked with an accent on the last syllable, the grave accent being understood.
  • n.
  • n. A male voice, the compass of which partakes of the common bass and the tenor, but which does not descend as low as the one, nor rise as high as the other.
  • n. A person having a voice of such range.
  • n. The viola di gamba, now entirely disused.
  • n. A word which has no accent marked on the last syllable, the grave accent being understood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having the quality of a voice or instrument intermediate between a bass and a tenor: as, a barytone voice. See II.
  • In Greek grammar: Pronounced with the (theoretical) grave accent on the last syllable (see grave, a.); having the last syllable unaccented: as, a barytone word, such as τόνος.
  • Causing a word to be without accent on the final syllable: as, a barytone suffix.
  • n. In music: A male voice, the compass of which partakes of the bass and the tenor, but which does not descend so low as the one nor rise so high as the other.
  • n. A stringed instrument played with a bow, resembling the viola da gamba, called in Italian viola di bardone or bordone.
  • n. The name usually given to the smaller brass sax-horn in or C.
  • n. In Greek grammar, a word which has the last syllable unaccented.
  • In Greek grammar, to pronounce or write without accent on the last syllable: as, to barytone a word.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a male singer

Etymologies

From Latin barytonos, from Greek βαρύτονος ‘not oxytone’. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Still more curious was the form of viol known as the barytone, which, in addition to an outfit of six catgut strings upon the finger board, was furnished with twenty-four wire strings, stretched close under the sounding board, where they sounded by sympathetic vibration.

    A Popular History of the Art of Music From the Earliest Times Until the Present

  • The prince was a great amateur of the peculiar viol called the barytone, and it was one of Haydn's duties to provide new compositions for this instrument.

    A Popular History of the Art of Music From the Earliest Times Until the Present

  • A crude, profane, hard-drinking and oversexed football player from Paris, Kansas, Gantry latched onto the ministry because of the power it gave him over others, through the exercise of his histrionic gifts and his "arousing barytone."

    Lewis's Profane Preacher

  • Gantry, using his histrionic gifts and his "arousing barytone," latched onto the ministry because of the power it gave him over others.

    Birthday of a Preacher Man:

  • It was to this workman that the strong barytone belonged which was heard above the sound of plane and hammer singing —

    Adam Bede

  • Look at this broad-shouldered man with the bare muscular arms, and the thick, firm, black hair tossed about like trodden meadow-grass whenever he takes off his paper cap, and with the strong barytone voice bursting every now and then into loud and solemn psalm-tunes, as if seeking an outlet for superfluous strength, yet presently checking himself, apparently crossed by some thought which jars with the singing.

    Adam Bede

  • David Bispham, the great barytone, always genial and generous, agreed to take part, and Clara Clemens, already accustomed to public singing, was to join in the program.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • The voice is strong and clear, but rather barytone than bass: in anger it becomes a shrill chattering like the cry of a wild animal.

    Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah and Meccah

  • This went far enough for attention to the music and the barytone.

    The Portrait of a Lady

  • Having myself a well-marked barytone voice of more than half an octave in compass, I sometimes add my vocal powers to her execution of:

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 01, No. 03, January, 1858

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