Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The state of matter in which a substance exhibits a characteristic readiness to flow and little or no tendency to disperse, and is amorphous but has a fixed volume and is difficult to compress.
  • noun Matter or a specific body of matter in this state.
  • noun Linguistics A consonant articulated without friction and capable of being prolonged like a vowel, such as English l and r.
  • adjective Of or being a liquid.
  • adjective Having been liquefied, especially.
  • adjective Melted by heating.
  • adjective Condensed by cooling.
  • adjective Flowing readily; fluid.
  • adjective Having a flowing quality without harshness or abrupt breaks.
  • adjective Linguistics Articulated without friction and capable of being prolonged like a vowel.
  • adjective Clear and shining.
  • adjective Existing as or readily convertible into cash.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Composed of particles that move freely among each other on the slightest pressure; of a fluid consistence; flowing, or capable of flowing; not fixed or solid.
  • Hence Clear or transparent, like a liquid: as, liquid eyes; liquid depths.
  • Tearful.
  • Sounding smoothly or agreeably to the ear; devoid of harshness: as, liquid melody.
  • Pronounced with a smoothly sonorous and freely continuable sound: as, a liquid letter. See II., 2.
  • See debt.
  • noun A substance of which the molecules, while not tending to separate from one another like those of a gas, readily change their relative position, and which therefore retains no definite form, except that determined by the containing receptacle; an inelastic fluid.
  • noun In grammar, a smoothly flowing sound or letter.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A substance whose parts change their relative position on the slightest pressure, and therefore retain no definite form; any substance in the state of liquidity; a fluid that is not gaseous and has a definite volume independent, of the container in which it is held. Liquids have a fixed volume at any given pressure, but their shape is determined by the container in which it is contained. Liquids, in contrast to gases, cannot expand indefinitely to fill an expanding container, and are only slightly compressible by application of pressure.
  • noun (Phon.) A letter which has a smooth, flowing sound, or which flows smoothly after a mute. M and n also are called liquids.
  • noun a measure, or system of measuring, for liquids, by the gallon, quart, pint, gill, etc.
  • adjective Flowing freely like water; fluid; not solid.
  • adjective (Physics) Being in such a state that the component molecules move freely among themselves, but have a definite volume changing only slightly with changes of pressure, and do not tend to separate from each other as the particles of gases and vapors do when the volume of the container is increased; neither solid nor gaseous.
  • adjective Flowing or sounding smoothly or without abrupt transitions or harsh tones.
  • adjective Pronounced without any jar or harshness; smooth.
  • adjective Fluid and transparent.
  • adjective obsolete Clear; definite in terms or amount.
  • adjective (Finance) In cash or readily convertible into cash without loss of principle; -- said of assets, such as bank accounts, or short-term bonds tradable on a major stock exchange.
  • adjective See Soluble glass, under Glass.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun physics A substance that is flowing, and keeping no shape, such as water; a substance of which the molecules, while not tending to separate from one another like those of a gas, readily change their relative position, and which therefore retains no definite shape, except that determined by the containing receptacle; an inelastic fluid.
  • noun phonetics An l or r sound.
  • adjective Flowing freely like water; fluid; not solid and not gaseous; composed of particles that move freely among each other on the slightest pressure.
  • adjective finance, of an asset Easily sold or disposed of without losing value.
  • adjective finance Having sufficient trading activity to make buying or selling easy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective existing as or having characteristics of a liquid; especially tending to flow
  • noun fluid matter having no fixed shape but a fixed volume
  • noun a frictionless continuant that is not a nasal consonant (especially `l' and `r')
  • noun a substance that is liquid at room temperature and pressure
  • adjective changed from a solid to a liquid state
  • adjective in cash or easily convertible to cash
  • noun the state in which a substance exhibits a characteristic readiness to flow with little or no tendency to disperse and relatively high incompressibility
  • adjective smooth and unconstrained in movement
  • adjective filled or brimming with tears
  • adjective smooth and flowing in quality; entirely free of harshness
  • adjective clear and bright

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From Middle English, of a liquid, from Old French liquide, from Latin liquidus, from liquēre, to be liquid.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English liquide, from Old French liquide, from Latin liquidus ("fluid, liquid, moist"), from liquere ("to be liquid, be fluid").

Examples

  • Like banks, they carry the risk that an otherwise solvent but liquid institution may be subject to a self­fulfilling and destructive run on its ­liquid liabilities.

    Archive 2008-09-01

  • Like banks, they carry the risk that an otherwise solvent but liquid institution may be subject to a self-­fulfilling and destructive run on its ­liquid liabilities.

    Archive 2008-09-01

  • Like banks, they carry the risk that an otherwise solvent but liquid institution may be subject to a self­fulfilling and destructive run on its ­liquid liabilities.

    Interesting Times

  • Like banks, they carry the risk that an otherwise solvent but liquid institution may be subject to a self-­fulfilling and destructive run on its ­liquid liabilities.

    Meltdown in Progress: Useful links

  • A THIN BATTER is one in which the general proportion of liquid and flour is _1 measure of flour_ to _1 measure of liquid_.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery Volume 1: Essentials of Cookery; Cereals; Bread; Hot Breads

  • And confusion arose when – in the absence of additional explanation, and in the presence of some editing changes – the term liquid oxygen was also used interchangeably with hydrogen peroxide.

    Corrections and clarifications

  • Usually when a liquid is cooled to below its melting point, crystals form and it solidifies; but sometimes it can become supercooled and remain liquid below its melting point because there are no nucleation sites to initiate the crystallisation.

    Archive 2005-09-01

  • The paradox here is that we are using the term liquid and crystal together.

    How Does a LCD Projector Work?t

  • In the industry we use the term liquid music or wallpaper, which means that music, will exist everywhere but not be noticed.

    CNN Transcript Feb 11, 2006

  • Efforts to end the release of more highly radioactive water at the Fukushima Daiichi plant finally met with some success Tuesday, Tepco said, as the injection of what it called "liquid glass" gel around a damaged pipe managed to reduce the toxic flow by half.

    Tiny Fish Spur Widening Worry

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