Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A consonant, such as (s), (z), (m), or (l), that can be prolonged as long as the breath lasts without a change in quality.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In mathematics, a determinant all whose constituents vanish, except those in the principal diagonal and the two bordering minor diagonals, while all those of one of these minor diagonals are equal to negative unity: as
  • noun Also cumulant.
  • noun A consonant such as f, v, s, z, etc., the sound of which may be indefinitely prolonged, as distinguished from a ‘stop,’ such as p, b, etc., which involves a complete closure of the mouth.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Continuing; prolonged; sustained.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun phonetics A linguistic sound other than a stop
  • noun mathematics A determinant formed from a tridiagonal matrix.
  • adjective Continuing; prolonged; sustained.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun consonant articulated by constricting (but not closing) the vocal tract
  • adjective of speech sounds produced by forcing air through a constricted passage (as `f', `s', `z', or `th' in both `thin' and `then')

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

continue +‎ -ant

Examples

  • In [[algebra]], the '' 'continuant' '' of a sequence of terms is an algebraic expression which has applications in [[generalized continued fraction]] s and as the determinant of a

    Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium - Recent changes [en]

  • No, because you're bounding a vowel ie. a continuant next to another continuant.

    Japanese dialect mirrors suspected PIE development of sibilantization between two dental stops

  • (Feb 23 2008) Right after posting this, I realized that if PIE *sal- "salt" is to also be explained by the same phonotactic rule I propose then I had better change the statement "that changes initial sequences of expected **RHe- (R = resonant, H = laryngeal) to *Rä- instead" to the revised "that changes initial sequences of expected **CHe- (C = continuant, H = laryngeal) to *Cä- instead".

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • So from a form like Mid IE *maxéd̰a- 'to rejoice', we can simply proceed as I had explained in my previous post which relies on a certain phonotactic-based rule I'm now hypothesizing during the Pre-IE event of Syncope that changes initial sequences of expected **CHe- (C = continuant, H = laryngeal) to *Cä- instead (MIE *maxéd̰a- 'to be rejoiceful' eLIE *mäd̰- PIE *mad- 'to be drunk').

    Drinking in more of the drunk-joy connection

  • (Feb 23 2008) Right after posting this, I realized that if PIE *sal- "salt" is to also be explained by the same phonotactic rule I propose then I had better change the statement "that changes initial sequences of expected **RHe- (R = resonant, H = laryngeal) to *Rä- instead" to the revised "that changes initial sequences of expected **CHe- (C = continuant, H = laryngeal) to *Cä- instead".

    Drinking in more of the drunk-joy connection

  • So from a form like Mid IE *maxéd̰a- 'to rejoice', we can simply proceed as I had explained in my previous post which relies on a certain phonotactic-based rule I'm now hypothesizing during the Pre-IE event of Syncope that changes initial sequences of expected **CHe- (C = continuant, H = laryngeal) to *Cä- instead (MIE *maxéd̰a- 'to be rejoiceful' eLIE *mäd̰- PIE *mad- 'to be drunk').

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • ROLAND MARTIN, CNN CONTRIBUTOR: Well, actually, what we were looking at is in terms of really a continuant.

    CNN Transcript Aug 28, 2008

  • This of course applies only to the ‘pre-vocalic’ R which is normally realized as a ‘frictionless continuant’ by such speakers.

    The Oxford BBC Guide to Pronunciation | Linguism | Language Blog

  • I notice that this happens only when they want to emphasize a word, because in other instances the frictionless continuant is used.

    The Oxford BBC Guide to Pronunciation | Linguism

  • This of course applies only to the ‘pre-vocalic’ R which is normally realized as a ‘frictionless continuant’ by such speakers.

    The Oxford BBC Guide to Pronunciation | Linguism

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