Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of or relating to the palate.
  • adjective Produced with the front of the tongue near or against the hard palate, as the (y) in English young.
  • adjective Produced with the blade of the tongue near the hard palate, as the (ch) in English chin.
  • adjective Produced with the front of the tongue in a forward position. Used of a vowel.
  • noun A palatal sound.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Situated on the outer lip, as the teeth at the aperture of a shell.
  • In anatomy, of or pertaining to the palate; palatine: as, palatal arteries, nerves, muscles; the palatal plate of the maxillary bone. Also palatial.
  • Uttered by the aid of the palate, as certain sounds. See II., 2.
  • noun A palatine bone or palate-bone proper, one of a pair, right and left, of facial bones entering into the formation of the hard palate.
  • noun A sound usually produced by the upper surface of the tongue against a part of the palate further forward than that at which our kand g are made; but sometimes used of any sound made between the tongue and any part of the hard or soft palate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to the palate; palatine.
  • adjective (Phonetics) Uttered by the aid of the palate; -- said of certain sounds, as the sound of k in kirk.
  • noun (Phon.) A sound uttered, or a letter pronounced, by the aid of the palate, as the letters k and y.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective anatomy Pertaining to the palate.
  • adjective dentistry, not comparable Of an upper tooth, on the side facing the palate.
  • adjective phonetics Articulated at the hard palate.
  • noun phonetics A palatal consonant.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective relating to or lying near the palate
  • adjective produced with the front of the tongue near or touching the hard palate (as `y') or with the blade of the tongue near the hard palate (as `ch' in `chin' or `j' in `gin')
  • noun a semivowel produced with the tongue near the palate (like the initial sound in the English word `yeast')

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From palate + -al.

Examples

  • In a normal mouse embryo, groups of cells called the palatal shelf on either side of the mouth grow outward, elevate to meet in the middle and fuse to form the palate.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • In a normal mouse embryo, groups of cells called the palatal shelf on either side of the mouth grow outward, elevate to meet in the middle and fuse to form the palate.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • In a normal mouse embryo, groups of cells called the palatal shelf on either side of the mouth grow outward, elevate to meet in the middle and fuse to form the palate.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • In a normal mouse embryo, groups of cells called the palatal shelf on either side of the mouth grow outward, elevate to meet in the middle and fuse to form the palate.

    R&D Mag - News

  • In a normal mouse embryo, groups of cells called the palatal shelf on either side of the mouth grow outward, elevate to meet in the middle and fuse to form the palate.

    Medlogs - Recent stories

  • In a normal mouse embryo, groups of cells called the palatal shelf on either side of the mouth grow outward, elevate to meet in the middle and fuse to form the palate.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • In a normal mouse embryo, groups of cells called the palatal shelf on either side of the mouth grow outward, elevate to meet in the middle and fuse to form the palate.

    RxPG News : Latest Medical, Healthcare and Research News

  • So the following will proceed by just assuming that the "non-palatal stop" series are uvulars which are aligned with *h₂, and that the "palatal" series (*ḱ, *ǵ, *ǵʰ) is the unmarked "plain stop" series (*k, *g and *gh).

    The origin of the Indo-European uvular stop (traditionally the "plain, non-palatalized stop")

  • I will go out on a limb and bet that the few words that are reconstructed with these sequences of *ke or *ek are falsely reconstructed, either because they are based on false evidence, because the proof points rather to its "palatal" counterpart, or because the vowel in question should be long n.b. that long vowels resist colouring normally caused by neighbouring *h₂.

    Archive 2007-10-01

  • I will go out on a limb and bet that the few words that are reconstructed with these sequences of *ke or *ek are falsely reconstructed, either because they are based on false evidence, because the proof points rather to its "palatal" counterpart, or because the vowel in question should be long n.b. that long vowels resist colouring normally caused by neighbouring *h₂.

    Reinterpreting the Proto-Indo-European velar series

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