ruzuzu has adopted the word madeupical, looked up 111243 words, created 741 lists, listed 36324 words, written 8891 comments, added 8640 tags, and loved 2183 words.

Comments by ruzuzu

  • "Alfred Thaddeus Crane Pennyworth is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, most commonly in association with the superhero Batman.

    "Pennyworth is depicted as Bruce Wayne's loyal and tireless butler, housekeeper, legal guardian, best friend, aide-de-camp, and surrogate father figure following the murders of Thomas and Martha Wayne. As a classically trained British actor and an ex-Special Operations Executive operative of honor and ethics with connections within the intelligence community, he has been called "Batman's batman"."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Alfred_Pennyworth&oldid=854935165

    August 16, 2018

  • Stellar work once again, qms!

    August 13, 2018

  • I like that I can look at the Recently Listed Words and tell right away that they'll be on one of your wonderful lists.

    August 13, 2018

  • "In American English, the original word for this seems to have been mantissa (Burks et al.), and this usage remains common in computing and among computer scientists. However, the term significand was introduced by George Forsythe and Cleve Moler in 1967, and the use of mantissa for this purpose is discouraged by the IEEE floating-point standard committee and by some professionals such as William Kahan and Donald Knuth, because it conflicts with the pre-existing use of mantissa for the fractional part of a logarithm (see also common logarithm). For instance, Knuth adopts the third representation 0.12345 × 10+3 in the example above and calls 0.12345 the fraction part of the number; he adds: "it is an abuse of terminology to call the fraction part a mantissa, since this concept has quite a different meaning in connection with logarithms".

    The confusion is because scientific notation and floating-point representation are log-linear, not logarithmic. To multiply two numbers, given their logarithms, one just adds the characteristic (integer part) and the mantissa (fractional part). By contrast, to multiply two floating-point numbers, one adds the exponent (which is logarithmic) and multiplies the significand (which is linear)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Significand&oldid=850602451 (citations and emphasis removed)

    August 8, 2018

  • The significand (also mantissa or coefficient, sometimes also argument or fraction) is part of a number in scientific notation or a floating-point number, consisting of its significant digits. Depending on the interpretation of the exponent, the significand may represent an integer or a fraction. The word mantissa seems to have been introduced by Arthur Burks in 1946 writing for the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, although this use of the word is discouraged by the IEEE floating-point standard committee as well as some professionals such as the creator of the standard, William Kahan."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Significand&oldid=850602451

    August 8, 2018

  • I found myself here again after looking up mantissa. Thanks, fbharjo!

    August 8, 2018

  • I didn't know fish had fur.

    August 7, 2018

  • I hope you won't fight me on this--I've added a couple entries.

    August 7, 2018

  • (Note the "n. Poultry feed" and "n. Slang Money" definitions over on scratch.)

    August 7, 2018

  • Cf. chicken scratch.

    August 7, 2018

  • I'd thought "paltry sum of money" too--but I just discovered chicken feed, which seems to be the more common expression.

    August 7, 2018

  • See comment on overline.

    July 27, 2018

  • See citations on radical and overline.

    July 27, 2018

  • "An overline, overscore, or overbar, is a typographical feature of a horizontal line drawn immediately above the text. In mathematical notation, an overline has been used for a long time as a vinculum, a way of showing that certain symbols belong together. The original use in Ancient Greek was to indicate compositions of Greek letters as Greek numerals. In Latin it indicates Roman numerals multiplied by a thousand and it forms medieval abbreviations (sigla)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Overline&oldid=844031262

    July 27, 2018

  • "In 1637 Descartes was the first to unite the German radical sign √ with the vinculum to create the radical symbol in common use today."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Radical_symbol&oldid=852068667

    July 27, 2018

  • *sings* It's beginning to look a lot like flesh-brush....

    July 25, 2018

  • Honk if you love this list. (*honk!*)

    July 25, 2018

  • I just noticed this definition from the Century: "In book-binding, to paste the end-papers and fly-leaves at the beginning and end of (a volume), before fitting it in its covers."

    July 25, 2018

  • "In 1786, the German scientist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg described the advantages of basing a paper size on an aspect ratio of √2 in a letter to Johann Beckmann. The formats that became ISO paper sizes A2, A3, B3, B4, and B5 were developed in France. They were listed in a 1798 law on taxation of publications that was based in part on page sizes.

    The main advantage of this system is its scaling. Rectangular paper with an aspect ratio of √2 has the unique property that, when cut or folded in half midway between its shorter sides, each half has the same √2 aspect ratio and half the area of the whole sheet before it was divided. Equivalently, if one lays two same-sized sheets paper with an aspect ratio of √2 side-by-side along their longer side, they form a larger rectangle with the aspect ratio of √2 and double the area of each individual sheet."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ISO_216&oldid=836238841

    July 25, 2018

  • Absolutely.

    July 25, 2018

  • Cf. non-dairy-beverages.

    July 25, 2018

  • Awwww. What a cutie! Okay, fine--I'll foster a list.

    July 25, 2018

  • Does anybody have a list about paper and/or papermaking yet?

    July 25, 2018

  • God bless Myrica.

    July 25, 2018

  • There's fun stuff over on this non-dairy-beverages list, too.

    July 25, 2018

  • This is great! I'd never heard of candlenut milk.

    July 25, 2018

  • So profoundly articulate!

    July 25, 2018

  • “As numbers go, the familiar real numbers — those found on the number line, like 1, π and -83.777 — just get things started. Real numbers can be paired up in a particular way to form “complex numbers,” first studied in 16th-century Italy, that behave like coordinates on a 2-D plane. Adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing is like translating and rotating positions around the plane. Complex numbers, suitably paired, form 4-D “quaternions,” discovered in 1843 by the Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton, who on the spot ecstatically chiseled the formula into Dublin’s Broome Bridge. John Graves, a lawyer friend of Hamilton’s, subsequently showed that pairs of quaternions make octonions: numbers that define coordinates in an abstract 8-D space.”

    — “The Peculiar Math That Could Underlie the Laws of Nature” (https://www.quantamagazine.org/the-octonion-math-that-could-underpin-physics-20180720/)

    July 23, 2018

  • "To make better; improve; alleviate or relieve (hunger, thirst, grief, the needs of a person, etc.)."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    July 16, 2018

  • Consider yourself added to my calendar.

    July 16, 2018

  • See comment on mathematical induction.

    July 16, 2018

  • When I talk with folks who've studied mathematics, they like to tell me how helpful induction is--but I've been confused, because it sounds much more like they're using deduction. Instead I've learned that they're actually talking about mathematical induction.

    I'll just leave this here for the next time I need to remember which is which:

    "For the history of the name "mathematical induction", see

    •Florian Cajori, Origin of the Name "Mathematical Induction" (1918):

    The process of reasoning called "mathematical induction" has had several independent origins. It has been traced back to the Swiss Jakob (James) Bernoulli |Opera, Tomus I, Genevae, MDCCXLIV, p. 282, reprinted from Acta eruditorum, Lips., 1686, p. 360. See also Jakob Bernoulli's Ars conjectandi, 1713, p. 95|, the Frenchmen B.Pascal |OEuvres completes de Blaise Pascal, Vol. 3, Paris, 1866, p. 248| and P.Fermat |Charles S Peirce in the Century Dictionary, Art."Induction," and in the Monist, Vol. 2, 1892, pp. 539, 545; Peirce called mathematical induction the "Fermatian inference"|, and the Italian F.Maurolycus |G.Vacca, Bulletin Am. Math. Soc., Vol. 16, 1909, pp. 70-73|."

    -- https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1080417/why-is-mathematical-induction-called-mathematical

    July 16, 2018

  • I adore this list!

    July 16, 2018

  • You've outdone yourself once again, qms!

    July 16, 2018

  • "As 17 is a Fermat prime, the regular heptadecagon is a constructible polygon (that is, one that can be constructed using a compass and unmarked straightedge): this was shown by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1796 at the age of 19."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Heptadecagon&oldid=837458759

    July 12, 2018

  • Ha! The first time I read that, I thought it said "vicious."

    July 3, 2018

  • From the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English:

    "A supposed collection of particles of very subtile matter, endowed with a rapid rotary motion around an axis which was also the axis of a sun or a planet. Descartes attempted to account for the formation of the universe, and the movements of the bodies composing it, by a theory of vortices."

    And from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "In the Cartesian philosophy, a collection of material particles, forming a fluid or ether, endowed with a rapid rotatory motion about an axis, and filling all space, by which Descartes accounted for the motions of the universe. This theory attracted much attention at one time, but is now entirely discredited."

    July 2, 2018

  • I'll second both previous comments.

    July 2, 2018

  • See citation on magma.

    July 2, 2018

  • "According to Bergman and Hausknecht (1996): "There is no generally accepted word for a set with a not necessarily associative binary operation. The word groupoid is used by many universal algebraists, but workers in category theory and related areas object strongly to this usage because they use the same word to mean 'category in which all morphisms are invertible'. The term magma was used by Serre |Lie Algebras and Lie Groups, 1965|." It also appears in Bourbaki's Éléments de mathématique, Algèbre, chapitres 1 à 3, 1970."

    -- From Wikipedia's page for "Magma (algebra)" (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Magma_(algebra)&oldid=848070422)

    July 2, 2018

  • Not what I was expecting.

    June 29, 2018

  • I just found your lovely hollow-land list. Someone had listed seeing, and I was intrigued by the tags.

    June 29, 2018

  • Blast! I nominate you to make the list, bilby.

    June 25, 2018

  • "Heliox generates less airway resistance than air and thereby requires less mechanical energy to ventilate the lungs. "Work of Breathing" (WOB) is reduced. It does this by two mechanisms:

    1.increased tendency to laminar flow;

    2.reduced resistance in turbulent flow."

    -- From Wikipedia's heliox page: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Heliox&oldid=835607282

    June 22, 2018

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "In botany, a name applied by Richard to a second small cotyledon which is found in wheat and some other grasses.

    In embryology, the outer or external blastodermic membrane or layer of cells, forming the ectoderm or epiderm: distinguished at first from hypoblast, then from both hypoblast and mesoblast. See cut under blastocæle."

    June 21, 2018

  • I like your lists.

    June 21, 2018

  • See citation (with a bit about Gauss) on pons asinorum.

    June 8, 2018

  • "While reading Claude Gaspard Bachet de Méziriac's edition of Diophantus' Arithmetica, Pierre de Fermat concluded that a certain equation considered by Diophantus had no solutions, and noted in the margin without elaboration that he had found "a truly marvelous proof of this proposition," now referred to as Fermat's Last Theorem. This led to tremendous advances in number theory, and the study of Diophantine equations ("Diophantine geometry") and of Diophantine approximations remain important areas of mathematical research."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Diophantus&oldid=842662729

    June 7, 2018

  • Cogito ergo can.

    June 5, 2018

  • Aw, shucks. Thanks vm. I love this site and everyone here--and I'm glad you're on the remarkable list, too.

    June 4, 2018

  • "Euler's work touched upon so many fields that he is often the earliest written reference on a given matter. In an effort to avoid naming everything after Euler, some discoveries and theorems are attributed to the first person to have proved them after Euler."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_things_named_after_Leonhard_Euler&oldid=844040346

    June 4, 2018

  • I've been having fun with the "List of things named after Leonhard Euler" page.

    June 4, 2018

  • Define pissfart.

    June 1, 2018

  • Ha--not sure how I missed it. Thank you, bilby!

    May 29, 2018

  • "A significant note, character, sign, token, or indication; a determinative attestation. In logic, to say that a thing has a certain mark is to say that something in particular is true of it. Thus, according to a certain school of metaphysicians, “incognizability is a mark of the Infinite.”"

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    May 22, 2018

  • Any time!

    May 22, 2018

  • That's some etymology.

    May 22, 2018

  • I went to a restaurant yesterday that offered bhendi masala, aloo govi, and baigan vartha.

    May 22, 2018

  • That's the risk (and joy) of open lists (and why open list is my middle name.)

    But, to my shame and horror, I just realized that bilby must have already added foredeck to this list ages ago. I'll still keep searching for fore words, though.

    May 18, 2018

  • I'd forgotten how much I love this list. (I just added foredeck.)

    May 18, 2018

  • Thanks, blby!

    May 18, 2018

  • And fanfare.

    May 17, 2018

  • You're not moved by pathos?

    May 15, 2018

  • "An iron bar bent at right angles at one end, used in the operation of puddling for stirring the melted iron, so as to allow it to be more fully exposed to the action of the air and the lining of the furnace."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    May 14, 2018

  • And I love that this list has rewrite.

    May 14, 2018

  • My new favorite list.

    May 14, 2018

  • *passes out spoons for everyone*

    Do we all have plates? Who still needs fufluns?

    May 14, 2018

  • Brackets around "proto-Wordie und playboy" please--I might have a couple places for it.

    May 14, 2018

  • See semantic satiation.

    May 14, 2018

  • Yes! And/or Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel.

    May 14, 2018

  • Just stopping by to say your prowess with the limericks is astonishing. I am ever in awe.

    May 4, 2018

  • why do you hate freedom

    May 4, 2018

  • Thanks, bilby!

    May 4, 2018

  • How had I never heard of Ebenezer Brewer before? Thank you!!!

    May 3, 2018

  • Each new list you make is my favorite!

    May 3, 2018

  • I think the Moines are allowed to travel where they please.

    May 3, 2018

  • See my-old-kentucky-home; also see word-derby.

    May 2, 2018

  • Also see places-in-oregon by misterbaby.

    May 2, 2018

  • seamount

    May 2, 2018

  • It's something that sounds infinitely more appetizing than a foot-ball.

    April 24, 2018

  • See comments on narrowbody.

    April 19, 2018

  • Brackets around a busybody, please. I have a list for it.

    Also, I looked through nobody's lists, but I didn't see this word there.

    April 19, 2018

  • *presses button politely*

    April 17, 2018

  • Ooh! A delicious food pellet!

    What a great party.

    April 16, 2018

  • *presses button*

    April 16, 2018

  • Is the Italian version called lapotopogigio?

    April 13, 2018

  • Ythanked.

    April 13, 2018

  • See comment on yclept.

    April 13, 2018

  • See comment on yclept.

    April 13, 2018

  • See comment on yclept.

    April 13, 2018

  • If those lamingtons were made with yellowcake uranium, I think I'll just hold out for a ylemon tart.

    April 13, 2018

  • This word reminds me of Elam.

    April 12, 2018

  • Holy water.

    "The first vending machine was also one of his constructions; when a coin was introduced via a slot on the top of the machine, a set amount of holy water was dispensed. This was included in his list of inventions in his book Mechanics and Optics. When the coin was deposited, it fell upon a pan attached to a lever. The lever opened up a valve which let some water flow out. The pan continued to tilt with the weight of the coin until it fell off, at which point a counter-weight would snap the lever back up and turn off the valve."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hero_of_Alexandria&oldid=835926439

    April 12, 2018

  • "In a poem by Ausonius in the 4th century AD, he mentions a stone-cutting saw powered by water. Hero of Alexandria is credited with many such wind and steam powered machines in the 1st century AD, including the Aeolipile and the vending machine, often these machines were associated with worship, such as animated altars and automated temple doors."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Engine&oldid=833084943

    April 12, 2018

  • I think it's chapter 718, but who's counting?

    Edit: No, wait--it's 717. My plaster--1 list is 718.

    April 12, 2018

  • See comment on myrobolan.

    April 6, 2018

  • Nice! You might enjoy john's yiddishkeit list.

    April 4, 2018

  • I adore Fables--and now I adore this list.

    April 4, 2018

  • "Coordination complexes have been known since the beginning of modern chemistry. Early well-known coordination complexes include dyes such as Prussian blue. Their properties were first well understood in the late 1800s, following the 1869 work of Christian Wilhelm Blomstrand."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Coordination_complex&oldid=829385587

    March 30, 2018

  • "In chemistry, a coordination complex consists of a central atom or ion, which is usually metallic and is called the coordination centre, and a surrounding array of bound molecules or ions, that are in turn known as ligands or complexing agents."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Coordination_complex&oldid=829385587

    March 30, 2018

  • Aw--thanks! And welcome to Wordnik!

    March 30, 2018

  • Might I suggest the Latvian Gambit?

    March 29, 2018

  • quibbling

    March 27, 2018

  • Would you consider adding falx?

    March 27, 2018

  • "Tartaric acid may be most immediately recognizable to wine drinkers as the source of "wine diamonds", the small potassium bitartrate crystals that sometimes form spontaneously on the cork or bottom of the bottle. These "tartrates" are harmless, despite sometimes being mistaken for broken glass, and are prevented in many wines through cold stabilization (which is not always preferred since it can change the wine's profile). The tartrates remaining on the inside of aging barrels were at one time a major industrial source of potassium bitartrate."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tartaric_acid&oldid=830080069

    March 27, 2018

  • Cf. raccoonnookkeeper.

    March 26, 2018

  • And if that Rockoon had a nook and a keeper, you could be a Rockoonnookkeeper.

    March 26, 2018

  • "A limit situation (German: Grenzsituation) is any of certain situations in which a human being is said to have differing experiences from those arising from ordinary situations.

    The concept was developed by Karl Jaspers, who considered fright, guilt, finality and suffering as some of the key limit situations arising in everyday life."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Limit_situation&oldid=814921970

    March 21, 2018

  • I have a friend who's reading Plutarch and told me she's been thinking about virtue. We were talking about indulgences and Martin Luther. Then I was reading a Wikipedia article about criticism, which led to critical thinking, then sapere aude, then limit-experience, then limit situation, then antinomianism, and I was right back to faith and good works.

    Saint Kateri Tekakwitha strikes again.

    March 21, 2018

  • What do we think of the Century definition here? Should it actually be under sling? (Cf. sile.)

    March 16, 2018

  • Just arrived here after getting push-pull as a random word. I adore this list.

    March 16, 2018

  • "Fincke was born in Flensburg, Schleswig and died in Copenhagen. His lasting achievement is found in his book Geometria rotundi (1583), in which he introduced the modern names of the trigonometric functions tangent and secant."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Thomas_Fincke&oldid=816128832

    March 16, 2018

  • "A bone in the human body which the Rabbinical writers affirmed to be indestructible, and which is variously said to have been one of the lumbar vertebræ, the sacrum, the coccyx, a sesamoid bone of the great toe, or one of the triquetrous or Wormian bones of the cranium."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    March 16, 2018

  • ““Trojan-horsing” is a term beloved among show creators, who believe that network executives want a dab of originality, but mostly for marketing purposes. When Jenji Kohan explained to NPR why she’d created the prison show “Orange Is the New Black” around the character of Piper, an attractive, upper-middle-class white woman, she said, “Piper was my Trojan horse. You’re not going to go into a network and sell a show on really fascinating tales of black women and Latina women and old women and criminals.””

    — From “Donald Glover Can’t Save You: The creator of “Atlanta” wants TV to tell hard truths. Is the audience ready?” By Tad Friend in The New Yorker (https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/03/05/donald-glover-cant-save-you).

    March 11, 2018

  • Spa... lining?

    March 7, 2018

  • From the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English:

    "n. Retirement; -- mostly used in a jocose or burlesque way."

    March 7, 2018

  • decrement

    March 6, 2018

  • sinister

    March 6, 2018

  • I like your lists.

    March 5, 2018

  • "A harlot; a strumpet; a baggage."

    --from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

    March 5, 2018

  • What a great list!

    March 5, 2018

  • See plethora's "words-and-phrases-i-picked-up-from-my-mother" list.

    March 2, 2018

  • Awww. Greetings, Mama Plethora!

    March 2, 2018

  • "The number of twenty-five eels, or the tenth part of a bind, according to the old statute de ponderibus. Also called strike."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    March 2, 2018

  • No seals were harmed in the making of this list.

    March 2, 2018

  • Just arrived here after getting varletess as a random word. What a great list!

    March 2, 2018

  • Not what I was expecting.

    March 1, 2018

  • "In machinery, a gearwheel of which the teeth are so formed that they are acted on and the wheel is made to revolve by a worm or shaft on which a spiral is turned—that is, by an endless screw. See cuts under Hindley's screw (at screw), steam-engine, and odometer."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    March 1, 2018

  • "In grammar, pertaining to or expressing an attribute; used (as a word) in direct description without predication: as, a bad pen, a burning house, a ruined man."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    March 1, 2018

  • And undercut.

    February 28, 2018

  • "An Italian oil-measure, equal in Lucca and Modena to 26⅜ United States (old wine) gallons: but in the Lombardo-Venetian system of 1803 tho coppo or cappo was precisely a deciliter."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    February 27, 2018

  • See comments on squash.

    February 23, 2018

  • I like how different these definitions are:

    "The unfertilized eggs of a female lobster, which turn a reddish color when cooked."

    -- from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

    "The ovaries of a cooked lobster; -- so called from their color."

    -- from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

    "The unimpregnated roe or eggs of the lobster, which when boiled assume the appearance of coral."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    February 22, 2018

  • Thanks, Bilby Baggins.

    February 22, 2018

  • With a furoshiki?

    February 21, 2018

  • Hottest baseball team yet.

    February 15, 2018

  • How 'bout them Yankees?

    February 15, 2018

  • I just read Peggy Guggenheim's Confessions of an Art Addict, which reminded me of De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, so forgive me if I get stuck in that vein (as it were).

    February 13, 2018

  • (Best to view surreptitiously.)

    February 13, 2018

  • I'd say this is my favorite of your lists so far, but I'd end up having to say that every time you make a new one.

    February 8, 2018

  • Ooh--brackets around "misuse of mustard" please.

    February 8, 2018

  • Arrived here after seeing armamentarium on the list of Recently Loved Words. What a fun list!

    February 5, 2018

  • What a fantastic list!

    February 2, 2018

  • "The issues — which would ultimately claim ten lives — turned out to be the result of a rare phenomenon known as “thunderstorm asthma.” Though still not fully understood, the weather event is thought to occur due to the spread of pollen and mold that gets swept into the high humidity of the clouds, broken into smaller particles, and rained back down. For a person with asthma — whose airways are chronically inflamed — the spread of these particles can set off an attack."

    -- https://undark.org/article/thunderstorm-asthma-australia/

    January 31, 2018

  • See comments on aporrhipsis.

    January 14, 2018

  • Cf. terminal burrowing.

    January 14, 2018

  • Man. That GNU Webster's definition is something I'd have expected from the Century: "The anguish, like gnawing pain, excited by a sense of guilt; compunction of conscience for a crime committed, or for the sins of one's past life."

    January 12, 2018

  • I favorited this list even before it had any entries--but now if I could favorite it again, I would.

    January 12, 2018

  • Brackets around "bilbutt" and "Captain Cranky Bowtie Bilbutt," please. I have a list for them.

    January 12, 2018

  • Ach! How did I miss this? Sionnach, you are the best.

    January 10, 2018

  • brumaire?

    January 10, 2018

  • Nothing ever could.

    January 8, 2018

  • I like your lists.

    January 8, 2018

  • What a fun list!

    January 8, 2018

  • “Richard Bernstein is the medical director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, and delivers his expertise to me in the patient-if-slightly brusque tone to which I am accustomed in every doctor I speak to. On a hunch I asked him if “beauty parlor stroke syndrome” is a real medical term, and he said no — getting one’s hair washed is merely one possibility in a range of options that cause the actual medical condition properly known as “vertebral artery dissection from hyperextension of the neck,” a considerably less grabby, though ultimately scarier name. What seems to happen is that certain movements of or pressures on the neck can result in a flap-like tear in the vertebral artery, which supplies blood to the brain. From there blood enters (and thereby thickens) the arterial wall, which can cause a blood clot, impeding blood flow and potentially causing a stroke.”

    — “Is Beauty Parlor Stroke Syndrome Going to Kill Me?” by Katie Heany (https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/03/is-this-going-to-kill-me-beauty-parlor-stroke-syndrome/517851/)

    January 7, 2018

  • I’m so sorry for your loss, rolig. It sounds like she was a delightful friend.

    January 7, 2018

  • See citation on ecosystem.

    January 4, 2018

  • "All around |Walter| Cannon, theorists were thrilling to the idea of self-righting systems, resistant to the buffeting forces of change. The English botanist Arthur Tansley coined the word “ecosystem” in 1935; the maintenance of stability would soon be described as one of the cardinal properties of ecologies. Soon economists were relating homeostasis to self-correcting markets; Norbert Wiener, the mathematician, saw that machines and creatures might be governed by autonomous control systems stabilized by “feedback” loops. Cells, cities, societies, even political institutions—all had the capacity to steady their states through the actions of self-regulated and counterpoised forces."

    -- "My Father’s Body, at Rest and in Motion" by Siddhartha Mukherjee (https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/01/08/my-fathers-body-at-rest-and-in-motion)

    January 4, 2018

  • "In the late nineteen-twenties, the physiologist Walter Cannon coined the term “homeostasis”—joining together the Greek homoios (similar) and stasis (stillness). The capacity to sustain internal constancy was an essential feature of an organism, he argued."

    -- "My Father’s Body, at Rest and in Motion" by Siddhartha Mukherjee (https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/01/08/my-fathers-body-at-rest-and-in-motion)

    January 4, 2018

  • "Of course, you might dismiss my suspicions as no more than the vivid imagination of a writer, and that’s certainly possible, because an occupational hazard of reading and writing about crime is spotting possible criminal enterprise everywhere and in everyone. To be a writer is to be curious, or to use Pittsburgh parlance, a nebnose."

    -- "The Suburban Serial Killer Next Door: On the Dark, Imagined Secrets of Pittsburgh" by Rebecca Drake (http://lithub.com/the-suburban-serial-killer-next-door/)

    January 4, 2018

  • assay

    December 29, 2017

  • "|Robert| Proctor had found that the cigarette industry did not want consumers to know the harms of its product, and it spent billions obscuring the facts of the health effects of smoking. This search led him to create a word for the study of deliberate propagation of ignorance: agnotology.

    It comes from agnosis, the neoclassical Greek word for ignorance or ‘not knowing’, and ontology, the branch of metaphysics which deals with the nature of being. Agnotology is the study of wilful acts to spread confusion and deceit, usually to sell a product or win favour."

    -- http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20160105-the-man-who-studies-the-spread-of-ignorance

    December 29, 2017

  • clinquant?

    December 27, 2017

  • moire

    December 26, 2017

  • "Rod Bray of developers Northbridge Properties told Newshub that the culprits were probably trying to cut their own demolition costs by fly-tipping the house.

    "The options are either pay to have it demolished, or you dump it somewhere else and make it someone else's problem," he said, pointing out that it would cost his company over NZ$20,000 ($13,800; £10,300) to remove it."

    -- "Entire house fly-tipped in New Zealand" http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-42166058

    November 29, 2017

  • "Earthquake Baroque is a style of Baroque architecture found in the Philippines, which suffered destructive earthquakes during the 17th century and 18th century, where large public buildings, such as churches, were rebuilt in a Baroque style. Similar events led to the Pombaline architecture in Lisbon following the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and Sicilian Baroque in Sicily following the 1693 earthquake."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Earthquake_Baroque&oldid=808426572

    November 13, 2017

  • Wow! What a cool list.

    November 6, 2017

  • Ha!

    November 6, 2017

  • "The exhibition’s title suggests an agonOverlook: Teresita Fernández Confronts Frederic Church at Olana. Fernández admits that’s the intention in a promotional video where she addresses the viewer, relating that she “wanted to create a somewhat confrontational and immersive experience” that would reinsert the “cultural component that’s always erased.”"

    -- https://hyperallergic.com/396690/grappling-with-the-hudson-river-school/

    October 25, 2017

  • "Beginning in the mid-1960s, investigators recognized that many HSPs function as molecular chaperones and thus play a critical role in protein folding, intracellular trafficking of proteins, and coping with proteins denatured by heat and other stresses."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Heat_shock_protein&oldid=797825597

    October 23, 2017

  • See the examples on phene.

    October 18, 2017

  • The usage examples for this suggest something quite different: "The so-called phene, or lammergeier, is fond of its young, provides its food with ease, fetches food to its nest, and is of a kindly disposition. (The History of Animals)"

    October 18, 2017

  • "The physician reading this mysterious letter was no ordinary doctor. He was the Honorable Gustav Scholer, head Coroner for the city of New York, and one of the era’s leading alienists—an arcane term for specialists who studied the mental pathology of those deemed “alienated” from society."

    -- "Peek Inside the Grisly, Salacious Case Files of NYC’s Head Coroner in the Early 1900s"

    by Luke Spencer (http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/peek-inside-the-grisly-salacious-case-files-of-nycs-head-coroner-in-the-early-1900s)

    October 13, 2017

  • I just noticed that this is the only listing of "ointmint" (my new favorite word).

    October 11, 2017

  • What a great list!

    October 11, 2017

  • "Of course, if a piano and a violin play the same high C at the exact same volume, there is still some quality that feels different between the two notes. It turns out that pure tones do not occur naturally, and when a piano or violin produces a high C, the sound wave is made up of a specific combination of different pure tones. The different amplitudes and frequencies have nice relationships with one another, which is why you hear a specific note rather than a mess of clashing noises, but the single pitch you hear does not correspond to a single frequency. The hard-to-define quality of sound that allows you to identify what instrument you’re listening to is determined by the exact combination of pure tones. When different instruments all play at the same time, the various pure tones add together to create the music you hear.

    "So what do pure tones have to do with the groove on a record being able to tell David Bowie and Nina Simone apart? It turns out that any curve can be written in exactly one way as a combination of curves with uniform amplitude and frequency. In other words, the single squiggle captured in the groove of a record player can be written as a combination of pure tones. And there is only one combination that will produce any particular squiggle. The tool that makes this possible comes from mathematics and is called the Fourier transform. Combined with the fact that the sound we experience is determined by the exact combination of pure tones, this bit of mathematics explains how the vinyl record groove can completely determine the music you hear."

    -- "Which Sounds Better, Analog or Digital Music?" by Katrina Morgan (https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/which-sounds-better-analog-or-digital-music/)

    October 11, 2017

  • These are my favorites from the Century:

    "Tipsy."

    "Sober; not tipsy."

    October 10, 2017

  • Aw, thanks, c_b. Anything to further our studies.

    October 10, 2017

  • Would you consider adding set-net?

    October 4, 2017

  • Another book to add to my list! Thanks, c_b.

    October 4, 2017

  • Heck yeah, it's interesting. I've been trying to figure out how to collect and grind my own pigments (mostly for paper marbling on alum-mordanted paper, but it's fun no matter what).

    October 4, 2017

  • "Proteins were recognized as a distinct class of biological molecules in the eighteenth century by Antoine Fourcroy and others, distinguished by the molecules' ability to coagulate or flocculate under treatments with heat or acid. Noted examples at the time included albumin from egg whites, blood serum albumin, fibrin, and wheat gluten.

    "Proteins were first described by the Dutch chemist Gerardus Johannes Mulder and named by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jacob Berzelius in 1838. Mulder carried out elemental analysis of common proteins and found that nearly all proteins had the same empirical formula, C400H620N100O120P1S1. He came to the erroneous conclusion that they might be composed of a single type of (very large) molecule. The term "protein" to describe these molecules was proposed by Mulder's associate Berzelius; protein is derived from the Greek word πρώτειος (proteios), meaning "primary", "in the lead", or "standing in front", + -in."

    -- from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Protein&oldid=799576822 (footnote citations removed)

    October 3, 2017

  • *favorited* (and also added to my request list at the library)

    October 3, 2017

  • This list makes me happy.

    October 3, 2017

  • Further affiant sayeth naught.

    October 3, 2017

  • These are great, c_b!

    October 2, 2017

  • Would you accept doge and/or doggo?

    October 2, 2017

  • "Linnaeus' remains comprise the type specimen for the species Homo sapiens, following the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, since the sole specimen he is known to have examined when writing the species description was himself."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Carl_Linnaeus&oldid=801408157

    September 29, 2017

  • Are there any lists of scientific names coined by Linnaeus? (And have I just nominated myself to make one?)

    September 29, 2017

  • See comment on bird's milk.

    September 28, 2017

  • See comment on bird's milk.

    September 28, 2017

  • "The concept of avian milk (Ancient Greek: ὀρνίθων γάλα, ornithon gala) stretches back to ancient Greece. Aristophanes uses "the milk of the birds" in the plays The Birds and The Wasps as a proverbial rarity. The expression is also found in Strabo's Geographica where the island of Samos is described as a blest country to which those who praise it do not hesitate to apply the proverb that "it produces even bird's milk" (φέρει καί ὀρνίθων γάλα). A similar expression lac gallinaceum (Latin for "chicken's milk") was also later used by Petronius (38.1) and Pliny the Elder (Plin. Nat. pr. 24) as a term for a great rarity. The idiom became later common in many languages and appeared in Slavic folk tales. In one such tale the beautiful princess tests the ardor and resourcefulness of her suitor by sending him out into the wilderness to find and bring back the one fantastical luxury she does not have: bird's milk. In the fairy tale Little Hare by Aleksey Remizov (who wrote many imitations of traditional Slavic folk tales) the magic bird Gagana produces milk."

    -- From https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ptasie_mleczko&oldid=781825215 (footnote citations removed)

    September 28, 2017

  • "In salt-making, a fire-brick arch of varying length, placed under the evaporating-pans to temper the heat and so prevent the salt from being burned."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    September 27, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "A genus of parmeliaceous lichens having a fruticulose or pendulous thallus, and apothecia with a concave disk of a color different from that of the thallus. Evernia Prunastri is used for dyeing, and was formerly used, ground down with starch, for hair-powder."

    September 27, 2017

  • I thought the first rule of linguistics fight club was that we weren't allowed to verb about linguistics fight club.

    September 26, 2017

  • Oh, excellent, qms. Well done!

    September 26, 2017

  • It certainly stands out--I guess I'd never thought about where it comes from before.

    September 18, 2017

  • I like this part from the Century: "In printing, one of a number of pieces of wood or metal, channeled in the center with a groove or gutter, used to separate the pages of type in a form. Also gutter-stick."

    September 18, 2017

Comments for ruzuzu

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  • I just noticed for the first time your kind comment on my profile!! Thank you!! I like your lists! They've served as many an inspiration for me.

    March 29, 2018

  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • Hey zuzu, hummus detected at botryoidal!

    May 17, 2016

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzuzuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • This made me think of you: http://www.metrolyrics.com/song-ml-video-cea.html

    It was probably the bananaphone.

    June 18, 2015

  • I only just recently noticed that there's a comments section! Yikes! Anyways, unreal-laurens-friend-finder is up and running and needs contributions! So many exclamation points!

    June 16, 2015

  • Eek! TankHughes, I'm glad I was able to point out that list to you, but I'm sorry to contribute to the demise of another. May I console myself with the thought that you'll eventually replace it with a new list for our amusement?

    April 23, 2015

  • I'd respond to you on my list... BUT I DELETED IT! *shock* It made more sense to add my 4 to tbtabby's Location Slang list instead. I'm happy someone else has made a large list that I can legitimately add Canadian tuxedo and Mexican wave to.

    April 21, 2015

  • Thank you for your kind comment of December 15, ruzuzu. It pains me to have overlooked your comment for so long but, in the absence of the Community page, I seem to have been looking in the wrong places for evidence of activity. I had begun to fear that I was the only one still visiting regularly.

    When I last communicated with Erin she wrote that she had a fix for the Community page but was having difficulty getting it installed on the server. I think it is possible we will not have the Community page back until after the holidays. I hope people will not have lost the habit of visiting.

    I hope your holidays are happy ones.

    December 22, 2014

  • Nope. Just dry pita pocket editions.

    August 11, 2014

  • Hey babe, read any good hummus books lately?

    August 10, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby. I needed that.

    July 21, 2014

  • Can you ask around for me then? I'm sure they come from Riga.

    *chortle chortle chortle*

    July 18, 2014

  • I'm really only a half-Lat. I have no idea what a marole is.

    July 18, 2014

  • What is a marole? I thought I might as well ask a Latvian.

    July 18, 2014

  • I don't know of a list for obsolete and disused science terms. Maybe time to start one?

    May 11, 2014

  • I vote we name the inherent sound of fun ruzuzurrus

    March 19, 2014

  • And so do I!

    But I don't understand how we are supposed to find this █████ comment box on one's profile.

    February 21, 2014

  • Hi ruzuzu. Bovine traces detected over at jomo.

    December 13, 2013

  • Hey ruzuzu, I have tripled the length of your calculator words list - hope you like it!

    May 13, 2013

  • I haven't heard her perform. I did have a chance to listen to her read some of her poems. She did them more than justice!

    April 16, 2013

  • I knew she plays the sax. Have you read 'Crazy Brave' yet?

    I wonder how many people realize the etymological significance of the title.

    Playing the sax is 'crazy brave' of course.

    The sax is the ultimate soul instrument with its long neck and throaty sound (see nephesh)

    My niece Ramona has taught me that well!

    She has 'crazy brave' in her blood, too.

    April 16, 2013

  • Me? Why?

    *retaliates with a volley of fufluns*

    January 28, 2013

  • Fonk you, ruzuzu.

    January 28, 2013

  • gallbladder!

    December 13, 2012

  • Spent the past half-hour reading your lists and almost choking on them. Love you!

    December 5, 2012

  • Thanks for sharper ruzuzu!

    November 8, 2012

  • *yawn*

    July 22, 2012

  • Thanks for the red admiral! By the way, I borrowed some of your spiders for my own little collection.

    July 10, 2012

  • Hi ruzuzu.

    It took me a while to find this reply box.

    Thank you for the welcome message.

    Please feel free to comment on my lists or add words to them.

    Robert

    May 22, 2012

  • Huh! Can't even make the pronunciations play at "hot dog"....go figure. ACK!

    April 25, 2012

  • So, the feedback page is otiose? 'Zu, are you able to create pronunciations? I'm having no luck at all. Is it broke? Can we access pronunciations of old?

    April 25, 2012

  • And I less than three you! Miss you guys. You know how it feels sometimes, though... I visit often but can't find anything to add to the conversation.

    I really wish there was an easier way to follow threads. If you don't spend lots of time here, you have to open all links on the Zeitmunity page. There has to be a different way!

    March 29, 2012

  • Thanks, 'zu. I probably would have found it eventually if I'd spent more time. Cheers!

    March 16, 2012

  • oh thank you, good catch!

    February 1, 2012

  • Thanks! Start -geddon ready to add some words...

    http://www.wordnik.com/lists/geddon--1

    January 29, 2012

  • Glad you liked my definition of Bulgar - I'm a total newbie. Don't know how to create a list, or what its purpose is, or how to use it, etc. Tips?

    January 20, 2012

  • What's all the fuss about

    January 14, 2012

  • Perhaps I'm

    January 13, 2012

  • Hmm.

    January 13, 2012

  • Dear ruzuzu,

    You are

    January 13, 2012

  • Thanks, Pro!

    January 13, 2012

  • January 13, 2012

  • I'm happy to hear that! Nobody had said "welcome to Wordnik" before you did, but I've been feeling more and more at home here, lately.

    January 9, 2012

  • *grins*

    January 4, 2012

  • Aww, shucks. You're awfully nifty yourself. :-)

    January 4, 2012

  • Here's another comment. Phew!

    January 3, 2012

  • Eek. I'm at 6666 comments. I was going to make a joke about how that's bad luck, but then my browser stopped working.

    January 3, 2012