ruzuzu has adopted the word madeupical, looked up 112618 words, created 757 lists, listed 37061 words, written 9002 comments, added 8759 tags, and loved 2253 words.

Comments by ruzuzu

  • I wonder whether Predator had a preditor.

    December 14, 2018

  • See bogue.

    December 13, 2018

  • "One who brings persons into a place or condition of restraint, in order to subject them to swindling, forced labor, or the like; especially, one who, for a commission, supplies recruits for the army or sailors for ships by nefarious means or false inducements; a decoy; a kidnapper. Such practices have been suppressed in the army and navy, and made highly penal in connection with merchant ships."

    -- From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    December 13, 2018

  • The words found under "same context" are fantastic:

    67-year-old

    abstinent

    arvernian

    be-ribboned

    chid

    crutched

    curmudgeonly

    ever-popular

    ever-youthful

    gray-uniformed

    moire

    n'est-ce

    natural-born

    nursemaid

    pro-german

    rebuffingthe

    shrivelled-up

    unfrocked

    vivant

    yellow-bearded

    your

    December 13, 2018

  • So, cake, obviously. But also Witter Bynner, who appears in the index of a book I've been reading--even though he's nowhere in the text--and who apparently wrote a play called Cake as revenge against Mabel Dodge Luhan. (See https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Witter_Bynner&oldid=867008750)

    December 11, 2018

  • Yum! In Latvian, the word for cake sounds a bit like "kooks."

    December 11, 2018

  • Delightful! I accept.

    Should we make a party? I could probably whip up some fufluns.

    December 11, 2018

  • "From Middle English cake, from Old Norse kaka ("cake") . . . ."

    Remind me to think twice before I call something a "piece of cake."

    December 11, 2018

  • All these pepparkakors and finska kakors and shortcakes and piparkūkas have me wondering (yet again) about the etymology for cake.

    December 11, 2018

  • My ancient Betty Crocker cookbook calls these "Nut-studded butter strips from Finland."

    December 11, 2018

  • Ooh, bilby bilby, it's a wild world.

    December 11, 2018

  • Oh! I wonder whether they're like Latvian piparkūkas.

    December 11, 2018

  • Wait. So is it like a cowcatcher? (Add it if you like--it's an open list.)

    December 7, 2018

  • R'amen.

    December 5, 2018

  • *curtseys*

    December 5, 2018

  • She probably got catfished.

    December 5, 2018

  • Thanks, bilby. It was you're something of a hotdog, aren't you (as originally seen in one of dontcry's comments over on spaghetti).

    December 4, 2018

  • Also see ha-ha.

    December 4, 2018

  • From the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English:

    "n. One of a breed of fancy frilled pigeons allied to the owls and turbits, having the body white, the shoulders tricolored, and the tail bluish black with a large white spot on each feather."

    December 3, 2018

  • Alloxan was used in the production of the purple dye murexide, discovered by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1776. Murexide is the product of the complex in-situ multistep reaction of alloxantin and gaseous ammonia. Murexide results from the condensation of the unisolated intermediate uramil with alloxan, liberated during the course of the reaction.

    Scheele sourced uric acid from human calculi (such as kidney stones) and called the compound lithic acid. William Prout investigated the compound in 1818 and he used boa constrictor excrement with up to 90% ammonium acid urate.

    In the chapter "Nitrogen" of his memoir The Periodic Table, Primo Levi tells of his futile attempt to make alloxan for a cosmetics manufacturer who has read that it can cause permanent reddening of the lips. Levi considers the droppings of pythons as a source for uric acid for making alloxan, but he is turned down by the director of the Turin zoo because the zoo already has lucrative contracts with pharmaceutical companies, so he is obliged to use chickens as his source of uric acid. The synthesis fails, however, "and the alloxan and its resonant name remained a resonant name."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Alloxan&oldid=822802116

    November 30, 2018

  • For more, see alloxan.

    November 30, 2018

  • I find myself at quite a loss

    To decide upon this evening’s sauce.

    What goes with spaghett?

    Is it just mignonette?

    Perhaps I’ll decide by coin toss.

    November 29, 2018

  • Cf. spaghett.

    November 29, 2018

  • This "noodle" is vaguely spaghetty,

    Though my soup should have been alphabetty.

    That cook in the back

    Looks a bit like yak--

    Perhaps this stray hair's from a yeti.

    November 29, 2018

  • I might have a lead on a guy who can loan me a pyrophone for the closing number. It's funny how you can just casually mention the name almost Solveig and people go out of their way.

    November 29, 2018

  • I was at a local coffee shop's self-service station this morning--trying to decide whether to get dark roast, medium roast, or the flavor of the day. I hate having to choose, so I just got a bit of each. The person behind me in line said, "Wait. Is that like a suicide, but with coffee?" I laughed and said, "Yes!"

    I don't remember when I first heard "suicide" as the term for combining all the soda pop options from a fountain machine--it's common enough. But it still kinda weirds me out.

    November 29, 2018

  • Didn't ibex dearie sing "Peel Me A Grape"?

    November 26, 2018

  • There ought. There's afflictions-of-the-realm and lots of old pharmacy terms formerly-used-in-medicine, but I still nominate you to create a more specific one for our amusement.

    November 26, 2018

  • Good one, qms. Yeehaw!

    November 23, 2018

  • Your citations are inspiring. I’ve been lazy about using the blockquote HTML tag—but no more! Thank you for your precision and dedication.

    November 23, 2018

  • Misnegation is an obscure word for a common phenomenon. You won’t find it in dictionaries, but you can probably figure out that it means some kind of ‘incorrect negation’ – not to be confused with double negatives (‘multiple negation’), criticism of which tends to be dubious.

    So what exactly are we talking about here?

    Misnegation is where we say something with negatives in it that don’t add up the way we intend. We lose track of the logic and reverse it inadvertently. For example, I might say that the likelihood of misnegation cannot be understated, when I mean it cannot be overstated – it is, in fact, easily understated.

    https://stancarey.wordpress.com/2018/11/19/misnegation-should-not-be-overestimated-i-mean-underestimated/amp

    November 23, 2018

  • This must be the yea of yea-high. Yeah?

    November 20, 2018

  • Nice! (I found this list as I was searching for yea-high.)

    November 20, 2018

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "n. The spur of rye; ergot.

    n. The morbid state induced by the excessive ingestion of ergot, as from the use of spurred or ergoted rye as food. Spasmodic and gangrenous forms are distinguished.

    n. A logical inference; a conclusion.

    n. Logical reasoning; ratiocination."

    November 20, 2018

  • See citation on hemimastigote.

    November 17, 2018

  • “Based on the genetic analysis they've done so far, the Dalhousie team has determined that hemimastigotes are unique and different enough from other organisms to form their own "supra-kingdom" — a grouping so big that animals and fungi, which have their own kingdoms, are considered similar enough to be part of the same supra-kingdom.”

    —“Rare microbes lead scientists to discover new branch on the tree of life” https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/hemimastigotes-supra-kingdom-1.4715823

    November 17, 2018

  • Here’s one: correctly-spelled-words-that-look-like-misspellings-of-other-words

    November 16, 2018

  • “Very early on a weekday, before the sun rose over the town of Aalsmeer, I stepped into Royal FloraHolland, the largest flower auction in the world.

    FloraHolland (royal designates a firm that has been in business for more than 100 years) is a single building so large that the numbers describing it make no sense: It covers 1.3 million square meters, 320 acres, the area of 220 football fields. It is one unfathomably large room, but a gantry stretches across it at the level of a second story, for visitors to walk along without getting in the way of business. Suspended in the middle of the gantry is the auction itself, rooms of traders in bleacher seating, wearing headsets and stabbing keyboards, staring at wall-sized screens of flower lots while electronic clocks tick down.“

    —“Killer Tulips Hiding in Plain Sight” The Atlantic https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/11/when-tulips-kill/574489/

    November 16, 2018

  • My new favorite list.

    November 13, 2018

  • Lovely, qms! If I had at least three more sets of tentacle-y appendages, I'd be clapping them all together right now!

    November 13, 2018

  • See citation on lingcod.

    November 12, 2018

  • “Initially, the octopus survey was launched to try to answer a question that staff members got regularly at the Seattle Aquarium: How many giant Pacific octopuses live in the Puget Sound? It turns out it’s not an easy question to answer, since there isn’t a firm population number for giant Pacifics.

    These octopuses normally live about three years. They eat a lot of crustaceans, mollusks, squid, fish and sometimes other species of octopus. They are so big that they only really have to watch out for extremely large fish, such as halibut and lingcod, and some marine mammals. But they hatch from an egg the size of a rice grain, so for more than a year after they’re born, they are at the mercy of a wide array of predators.”

    https://www.citylab.com/environment/2018/11/giant-pacific-octopus-survey-puget-sound-seattle-aquarium/574408/

    November 12, 2018

  • Cf. touchwood.

    November 6, 2018

  • When I was a kid, I used to listen to an album where Jean Ritchie sang "Children's Songs & Games from the Southern Mountains." One of the songs was about a bunch of farmyard animals--a horse that "goes neigh-neigh" and a sheep that "goes baa-baa" and a pig that "goes griffy-gruffy."

    Maybe grumphie and griffy-gruffy aren't related, but I feel a little more at ease about why that pig wasn't just oinking.

    November 6, 2018

  • "Counter-mapping refers to efforts to map "against dominant power structures, to further seemingly progressive goals". The term was coined by Nancy Peluso in 1995 to describe the commissioning of maps by forest users in Kalimantan, Indonesia, as a means of contesting state maps of forest areas that typically undermined indigenous interests. The resultant counter-hegemonic maps had the ability to strengthen forest users' resource claims."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Counter-mapping&oldid=863668724 (footnote references removed)

    November 5, 2018

  • "The equals sign or equality sign (=) is a mathematical symbol used to indicate equality. It was invented in 1557 by Robert Recorde. In an equation, the equals sign is placed between two (or more) expressions that have the same value."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Equals_sign&oldid=865723782

    November 1, 2018

  • "Narayana's cows is an integer sequence created by considering a cow, which begins to have one baby a year, beginning in its fourth year, and all its children do the same."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Narayana_Pandita&oldid=860912535

    October 30, 2018

  • “A hat with three points or horns; a cocked hat having the brim folded upward against the crown on three sides, producing three angles; hence, by popular misapplication, the hat worn by the French gendarmes, which has only two points: usually written as French, tricorne. See cut 13 under hat.”

    — from The Century Dictionary

    October 29, 2018

  • So cool--thanks for sharing this, alexz!

    October 29, 2018

  • Oh, gold star for that one, TankHughes!

    October 29, 2018

  • See citation on inselberg.

    October 29, 2018

  • "An inselberg or monadnock (/məˈnædnɒk/) is an isolated rock hill, knob, ridge, or small mountain that rises abruptly from a gently sloping or virtually level surrounding plain. In southern and south-central Africa, a similar formation of granite is known as a koppie, an Afrikaans word ("little head") from the Dutch word kopje. If the inselberg is dome-shaped and formed from granite or gneiss, it can also be called a bornhardt, though not all bornhardts are inselbergs."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Inselberg&oldid=854724700

    October 29, 2018

  • "Brazil's vast inland cerrado region was regarded as unfit for farming before the 1960s because the soil was too acidic and poor in nutrients, according to Nobel Peace Prize winner Norman Borlaug, an American plant scientist referred to as the father of the Green Revolution. However, from the 1960s, vast quantities of lime (pulverised chalk or limestone) were poured on the soil to reduce acidity. The effort went on and in the late 1990s between 14 million and 16 million tonnes of lime were being spread on Brazilian fields each year. The quantity rose to 25 million tonnes in 2003 and 2004, equalling around five tonnes of lime per hectare. As a result, Brazil has become the world's second biggest soybean exporter and, thanks to the boom in animal feed production, Brazil is now the biggest exporter of beef and poultry in the world."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Agricultural_lime&oldid=854535911

    October 29, 2018

  • tropicopolitan

    October 26, 2018

  • circa?

    October 25, 2018

  • I've heard of kangaroo boxing... is this a marsupial thing?

    October 22, 2018

  • Man! How did I miss this great list? I just stumbled upon it only after looking up morin.

    October 18, 2018

  • See opuscule.

    October 17, 2018

  • I'll add only that puķīte sounds a little better than it looks--that ķ in the middle makes it more like "pooch-eat."

    October 15, 2018

  • Aw, shucks. Thanks, vm. (And it looks like that one has been fixed now.)

    October 15, 2018

  • Thanks! Glad to see you've tossed in a few of your own.

    October 12, 2018

  • Oh, nice! I am ever in awe at your skill with these, qms.

    October 11, 2018

  • Here's a blooming list for our amusement: blooms--2.

    October 11, 2018

  • Has anyone made a list of blooms yet? I'd add Leopold.

    October 9, 2018

  • "Minkowski is perhaps best known for his work in relativity, in which he showed in 1907 that his former student Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity (1905) could be understood geometrically as a theory of four-dimensional space–time, since known as the "Minkowski spacetime"."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hermann_Minkowski&oldid=861259780

    October 5, 2018

  • "Louis Pasteur could rightly be described as the first stereochemist, having observed in 1842 that salts of tartaric acid collected from wine production vessels could rotate plane polarized light, but that salts from other sources did not. This property, the only physical property in which the two types of tartrate salts differed, is due to optical isomerism."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stereochemistry&oldid=858092147

    October 2, 2018

  • I’m reminded of a song my grandmother taught me about the three jolly fisher- fisher- men men men who should have gone to Amster- Amster- sh! sh! sh!

    September 30, 2018

  • Stet.

    September 30, 2018

  • Thanks, qms, but yours are always better.

    I'm beginning to wonder whether your initials stand for Quite Masterful Scop (or some such).

    September 28, 2018

  • Mmm. Tasty lichens.

    September 28, 2018

  • ""We really don't understand what makes the human brain special," said Ed Lein, Ph.D., Investigator at the Allen Institute for Brain Science. "Studying the differences at the level of cells and circuits is a good place to start, and now we have new tools to do just that."

    In a new study published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience, Lein and his colleagues reveal one possible answer to that difficult question. The research team, co-led by Lein and Gábor Tamás, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at the University of Szeged in Szeged, Hungary, has uncovered a new type of human brain cell that has never been seen in mice and other well-studied laboratory animals.

    Tamás and University of Szeged doctoral student Eszter Boldog dubbed these new cells "rosehip neurons" -- to them, the dense bundle each brain cell's axon forms around the cell's center looks just like a rose after it has shed its petals, he said. The newly discovered cells belong to a class of neurons known as inhibitory neurons, which put the brakes on the activity of other neurons in the brain."

    -- https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180827180809.htm

    September 27, 2018

  • See citation on idiothetic.

    September 27, 2018

  • "Idiothetic literally means "self-proposition" (Greek derivation), and is used in navigation models (e.g., of a rat in a maze) to describe the use of self-motion cues, rather than allothetic, or external, cues such as landmarks, to determine position and movement."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Idiothetic&oldid=800426728

    September 27, 2018

  • See citation on equation.

    September 27, 2018

  • "The equation of time describes the discrepancy between two kinds of solar time. The word equation is used in the medieval sense of "reconcile a difference". The two times that differ are the apparent solar time, which directly tracks the diurnal motion of the Sun, and mean solar time, which tracks a theoretical mean Sun with noons 24 hours apart."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Equation_of_time&oldid=861068135

    September 27, 2018

  • Oh, fun! I had a copy of Grendel when I was a kid, so I have a sentimental fondness for the monster.

    In his novel take on the plot

    John Gardner's hero was not

    A prince or a poet

    But (wouldn't you know it)

    The beast--who finally gets caught.

    September 27, 2018

  • "Commesso, also referred to as Florentine mosaic, is a method of piecing together cut sections of luminous, narrow gemstones to form works of art."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Commesso&oldid=804026345

    September 26, 2018

  • See https://medievalbooks.nl/2018/09/20/me-myself-and-i/

    September 24, 2018

  • Paldies, vendingmachine! I hadn't heard that one before--though it fits perfectly with bird's milk and blooming fern.

    September 24, 2018

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "n. A name given by Berzelius to the substance to which the red color of leaves in autumn is due."

    September 18, 2018

  • "'Mangkhut'" (Thai pronunciation: |māŋ.kʰút|) is the Thai name for the mangosteen."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Typhoon_Mangkhut&oldid=860020566

    September 17, 2018

  • Also see comment on pataphysical.

    September 17, 2018

  • "|Paul| McCartney's wife Linda said that he had become interested in avant-garde theatre and had immersed himself in the writings of Alfred Jarry. This influence is reflected in the story and tone of "Maxwell's Silver Hammer", and also explains how McCartney came across Jarry's word "pataphysical", which occurs in the lyrics."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Maxwell%27s_Silver_Hammer&oldid=859775445

    See pataphysics.

    September 17, 2018

  • Excellent. You might also like these hogwash and humbug-and-bafflegab lists.

    September 17, 2018

  • Here's a nice bit from The Century:

    "Synonyms Accurate, Correct, Exact, Precise, Nice, careful, particular, true, faithful, strict, painstaking, unerring. Of these words correct is the feeblest; it is barely more than not faulty, as tested by some standard or rule. Accurate implies careful and successful endeavor to be correct: as, an accurate accountant, and, by extension of the meaning, accurate accounts; an accurate likeness. Exact is stronger, carrying the accuracy down to minute details: as, an exact likeness. It is more commonly used of things, while precise is used of persons: as, the exact truth; he is very precise in his ways. Precise may represent an excess of nicety, but exact and accurate rarely do so: as, she is prim and precise. As applied more specifically to the processes and results of thought and investigation, exact means absolutely true; accurate, up to a limited standard of truth; precise, as closely true as the utmost care will secure. Thus, the exact ratio of the circumference to the diameter cannot be stated, but the value 3.14159265 is accurate to eight places of decimals, which is sufficiently precise for the most refined measurements. Nice emphasizes the attention paid to minute and delicate points, often in a disparaging sense: as, he is more nice than wise."

    September 17, 2018

  • Well done, qms!

    September 17, 2018

  • See cloud-cuckoo-land.

    September 17, 2018

  • See cloud cuckoo land.

    September 17, 2018

  • Found another. Check out write--2.

    September 14, 2018

  • Hm... pyrolytic, motor pool, Jonbar hinge, pariah dog and zopilote, contrail, gyrodyne, gum....

    Yup. An ideal list.

    September 14, 2018

  • "Chicken eyeglasses, also known as chickens specs, chicken goggles, generically as pick guards and under other names, were small eyeglasses made for chickens intended to prevent feather pecking and cannibalism. They differ from blinders as they allowed the bird to see forward whereas blinders do not. One variety used rose-colored lenses as the coloring was thought to prevent a chicken wearing them from recognizing blood on other chickens which may increase the tendency for abnormal injurious behavior."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chicken_eyeglasses&oldid=826144795

    September 14, 2018

  • Arrived here after looking up motor. What a fun list!

    September 12, 2018

  • "In the eastern United States, the shafts of mattocks are often fitted with a screw below the head and parallel with it to secure the head from slipping down the shaft, but in the western United States, where tools are more commonly dismantled for transport, this is rarely done. When made to be dismantled, the shaft of a mattock fits into the oval eye of the head, and is fixed by striking the head end of the shaft against a solid surface, such as a tree stump, rock, or firm ground. The head end of the shaft is tapered outwards, and the oval opening of the iron head is similarly tapered so that the head will not fly off when used. The mattock head ought never be raised higher than the user's hands, so that it will not slide down and hit the user's hands."

    --https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mattock&oldid=855853143

    (I wonder whether lyron's father's mattock was actually from West Virginia.)

    September 10, 2018

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "In a knitting-machine, mechanism which travels on a bar called the slur-bar, and depresses the jack-sinkers in succession, sinking a loop of thread between every pair of needles."

    September 6, 2018

  • "Elizabeth Fulhame (fl. 1794) was a Scottish chemist who invented the concept of catalysis and discovered photoreduction. She describes catalysis as a process at length in her 1794 book An Essay On Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dying and Painting, wherein the Phlogistic and Antiphlogistic Hypotheses are Proved Erroneous. The book relates in painstaking detail her experiments with oxidation-reduction reactions, and the conclusions she draws regarding Phlogiston theory, in which she disagrees with both the Phlogistians and Antiphlogistians."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Elizabeth_Fulhame&oldid=850969064

    September 6, 2018

  • Oh! What an ingenious list.

    September 5, 2018

  • See comment on Billy Eckstine.

    September 5, 2018

  • "Culturally Eckstine was a fashion icon. He was famous for his "Mr. B. Collar"- a high roll collar that formed a "B" over a Windsor-knotted tie. The collars were worn by many a hipster in the late 1940s and early 1950s."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Billy_Eckstine&oldid=852426215

    September 5, 2018

  • Just added shoe-boss.

    September 5, 2018

  • "At age 50, Dexter authored A Pickle for the Knowing Ones or Plain Truth in a Homespun Dress, in which he complained about politicians, the clergy, and his wife. The book contained 8,847 words and 33,864 letters, but without punctuation and seemingly random capitalization. Dexter initially handed his book out for free, but it became popular and was reprinted eight times. In the second edition, Dexter added an extra page which consisted of 13 lines of punctuation marks with the instructions that readers could distribute them as they pleased."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timothy_Dexter&oldid=851828716

    Also see t.

    September 5, 2018

  • "n. A white clay pipe with the initials T. D. on the bowl. Said to be due to a legacy left by the eccentric “Lord” Timothy Dexter of Newburyport, Mass., in order to perpetuate his name. By extension, T. D. means clay pipe. Dialect Notes, III. iii."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    September 5, 2018

  • "Catalyst poisoning refers to the partial or total deactivation of a catalyst. Poisoning is caused by chemical compounds. Although usually undesirable, poisoning may be helpful when it results in improved selectivity. For example, Lindlar's catalyst is poisoned so that it selectively catalyzes the reduction of alkynes. On the other hand Lead from leaded gasoline deactivates catalytic converters."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Catalyst_poisoning&oldid=851286480

    September 5, 2018

  • "Chemistry & Physics: A substance that inhibits another substance or a reaction: a catalyst poison."

    -- from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

    September 5, 2018

  • "In natural history, unstable; unfixed; hence, uncertain; unreliable: applied to characters which are not fixed or uniformly present, and therefore are valueless for scientific classification.

    In entomology, tending to become obsolete in one part; fading out: as, antennal scrobes evanescent posteriorly."

    -- Century Dictionary

    September 4, 2018

  • "The black swallow-wort was recently spotted in the Grand Traverse County community of Kingsley, the Traverse City Record-Eagle reported. The vine has heart-shaped leaves and small, dark purple flowers. The plant, which typically grows along roadsides, pastures and gardens, can choke out native vegetation and poison insects and wildlife."

    -- "Monarch butterfly-killing invasive plant found in northern Michigan" https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/09/03/monarch-butterfly-black-swallow-wort/1185116002/

    September 4, 2018

  • "A pronic number is a number which is the product of two consecutive integers, that is, a number of the form n(n + 1). The study of these numbers dates back to Aristotle. They are also called oblong numbers, heteromecic numbers, or rectangular numbers; however, the "rectangular number" name has also been applied to the composite numbers."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pronic_number&oldid=850129619

    August 29, 2018

  • Ha! Check out the "reverse dictionary" section for this word.

    August 23, 2018

  • I have a few of these over on my antonomasia list, but this one is better. In fact, I'd be willing to say that rolig is a regular rolig with these (to coin a phrase).

    August 23, 2018

  • Ooh! Thanks, rolig.

    August 23, 2018

  • I was wondering whether the "go" part of this was a clue.

    August 22, 2018

  • hbd, qms!

    August 22, 2018

  • I'm pretty sure I first encountered fewmets in Madeleine L'Engle's book A Wind in the Door.

    August 21, 2018

  • I pressed Random word and got Englishly, but that seemed too on the nose. How's about paleoichnology?

    August 20, 2018

  • "Alfred Thaddeus Crane Pennyworth is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, most commonly in association with the superhero Batman.

    "Pennyworth is depicted as Bruce Wayne's loyal and tireless butler, housekeeper, legal guardian, best friend, aide-de-camp, and surrogate father figure following the murders of Thomas and Martha Wayne. As a classically trained British actor and an ex-Special Operations Executive operative of honor and ethics with connections within the intelligence community, he has been called "Batman's batman"."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Alfred_Pennyworth&oldid=854935165

    August 16, 2018

  • Stellar work once again, qms!

    August 13, 2018

  • I like that I can look at the Recently Listed Words and tell right away that they'll be on one of your wonderful lists.

    August 13, 2018

  • "In American English, the original word for this seems to have been mantissa (Burks et al.), and this usage remains common in computing and among computer scientists. However, the term significand was introduced by George Forsythe and Cleve Moler in 1967, and the use of mantissa for this purpose is discouraged by the IEEE floating-point standard committee and by some professionals such as William Kahan and Donald Knuth, because it conflicts with the pre-existing use of mantissa for the fractional part of a logarithm (see also common logarithm). For instance, Knuth adopts the third representation 0.12345 × 10+3 in the example above and calls 0.12345 the fraction part of the number; he adds: "it is an abuse of terminology to call the fraction part a mantissa, since this concept has quite a different meaning in connection with logarithms".

    The confusion is because scientific notation and floating-point representation are log-linear, not logarithmic. To multiply two numbers, given their logarithms, one just adds the characteristic (integer part) and the mantissa (fractional part). By contrast, to multiply two floating-point numbers, one adds the exponent (which is logarithmic) and multiplies the significand (which is linear)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Significand&oldid=850602451 (citations and emphasis removed)

    August 8, 2018

  • The significand (also mantissa or coefficient, sometimes also argument or fraction) is part of a number in scientific notation or a floating-point number, consisting of its significant digits. Depending on the interpretation of the exponent, the significand may represent an integer or a fraction. The word mantissa seems to have been introduced by Arthur Burks in 1946 writing for the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, although this use of the word is discouraged by the IEEE floating-point standard committee as well as some professionals such as the creator of the standard, William Kahan."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Significand&oldid=850602451

    August 8, 2018

  • I found myself here again after looking up mantissa. Thanks, fbharjo!

    August 8, 2018

  • I didn't know fish had fur.

    August 7, 2018

  • I hope you won't fight me on this--I've added a couple entries.

    August 7, 2018

  • (Note the "n. Poultry feed" and "n. Slang Money" definitions over on scratch.)

    August 7, 2018

  • Cf. chicken scratch.

    August 7, 2018

  • I'd thought "paltry sum of money" too--but I just discovered chicken feed, which seems to be the more common expression.

    August 7, 2018

  • See comment on overline.

    July 27, 2018

  • See citations on radical and overline.

    July 27, 2018

  • "An overline, overscore, or overbar, is a typographical feature of a horizontal line drawn immediately above the text. In mathematical notation, an overline has been used for a long time as a vinculum, a way of showing that certain symbols belong together. The original use in Ancient Greek was to indicate compositions of Greek letters as Greek numerals. In Latin it indicates Roman numerals multiplied by a thousand and it forms medieval abbreviations (sigla)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Overline&oldid=844031262

    July 27, 2018

  • "In 1637 Descartes was the first to unite the German radical sign √ with the vinculum to create the radical symbol in common use today."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Radical_symbol&oldid=852068667

    July 27, 2018

  • *sings* It's beginning to look a lot like flesh-brush....

    July 25, 2018

  • Honk if you love this list. (*honk!*)

    July 25, 2018

  • I just noticed this definition from the Century: "In book-binding, to paste the end-papers and fly-leaves at the beginning and end of (a volume), before fitting it in its covers."

    July 25, 2018

  • "In 1786, the German scientist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg described the advantages of basing a paper size on an aspect ratio of √2 in a letter to Johann Beckmann. The formats that became ISO paper sizes A2, A3, B3, B4, and B5 were developed in France. They were listed in a 1798 law on taxation of publications that was based in part on page sizes.

    The main advantage of this system is its scaling. Rectangular paper with an aspect ratio of √2 has the unique property that, when cut or folded in half midway between its shorter sides, each half has the same √2 aspect ratio and half the area of the whole sheet before it was divided. Equivalently, if one lays two same-sized sheets paper with an aspect ratio of √2 side-by-side along their longer side, they form a larger rectangle with the aspect ratio of √2 and double the area of each individual sheet."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ISO_216&oldid=836238841

    July 25, 2018

  • Absolutely.

    July 25, 2018

  • Cf. non-dairy-beverages.

    July 25, 2018

  • Awwww. What a cutie! Okay, fine--I'll foster a list.

    July 25, 2018

  • Does anybody have a list about paper and/or papermaking yet?

    July 25, 2018

  • God bless Myrica.

    July 25, 2018

  • There's fun stuff over on this non-dairy-beverages list, too.

    July 25, 2018

  • This is great! I'd never heard of candlenut milk.

    July 25, 2018

  • So profoundly articulate!

    July 25, 2018

  • “As numbers go, the familiar real numbers — those found on the number line, like 1, π and -83.777 — just get things started. Real numbers can be paired up in a particular way to form “complex numbers,” first studied in 16th-century Italy, that behave like coordinates on a 2-D plane. Adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing is like translating and rotating positions around the plane. Complex numbers, suitably paired, form 4-D “quaternions,” discovered in 1843 by the Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton, who on the spot ecstatically chiseled the formula into Dublin’s Broome Bridge. John Graves, a lawyer friend of Hamilton’s, subsequently showed that pairs of quaternions make octonions: numbers that define coordinates in an abstract 8-D space.”

    — “The Peculiar Math That Could Underlie the Laws of Nature” (https://www.quantamagazine.org/the-octonion-math-that-could-underpin-physics-20180720/)

    July 23, 2018

  • "To make better; improve; alleviate or relieve (hunger, thirst, grief, the needs of a person, etc.)."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    July 16, 2018

  • Consider yourself added to my calendar.

    July 16, 2018

  • See comment on mathematical induction.

    July 16, 2018

  • When I talk with folks who've studied mathematics, they like to tell me how helpful induction is--but I've been confused, because it sounds much more like they're using deduction. Instead I've learned that they're actually talking about mathematical induction.

    I'll just leave this here for the next time I need to remember which is which:

    "For the history of the name "mathematical induction", see

    •Florian Cajori, Origin of the Name "Mathematical Induction" (1918):

    The process of reasoning called "mathematical induction" has had several independent origins. It has been traced back to the Swiss Jakob (James) Bernoulli |Opera, Tomus I, Genevae, MDCCXLIV, p. 282, reprinted from Acta eruditorum, Lips., 1686, p. 360. See also Jakob Bernoulli's Ars conjectandi, 1713, p. 95|, the Frenchmen B.Pascal |OEuvres completes de Blaise Pascal, Vol. 3, Paris, 1866, p. 248| and P.Fermat |Charles S Peirce in the Century Dictionary, Art."Induction," and in the Monist, Vol. 2, 1892, pp. 539, 545; Peirce called mathematical induction the "Fermatian inference"|, and the Italian F.Maurolycus |G.Vacca, Bulletin Am. Math. Soc., Vol. 16, 1909, pp. 70-73|."

    -- https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1080417/why-is-mathematical-induction-called-mathematical

    July 16, 2018

  • I adore this list!

    July 16, 2018

  • You've outdone yourself once again, qms!

    July 16, 2018

  • "As 17 is a Fermat prime, the regular heptadecagon is a constructible polygon (that is, one that can be constructed using a compass and unmarked straightedge): this was shown by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1796 at the age of 19."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Heptadecagon&oldid=837458759

    July 12, 2018

  • Ha! The first time I read that, I thought it said "vicious."

    July 3, 2018

  • From the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English:

    "A supposed collection of particles of very subtile matter, endowed with a rapid rotary motion around an axis which was also the axis of a sun or a planet. Descartes attempted to account for the formation of the universe, and the movements of the bodies composing it, by a theory of vortices."

    And from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "In the Cartesian philosophy, a collection of material particles, forming a fluid or ether, endowed with a rapid rotatory motion about an axis, and filling all space, by which Descartes accounted for the motions of the universe. This theory attracted much attention at one time, but is now entirely discredited."

    July 2, 2018

  • I'll second both previous comments.

    July 2, 2018

  • See citation on magma.

    July 2, 2018

  • "According to Bergman and Hausknecht (1996): "There is no generally accepted word for a set with a not necessarily associative binary operation. The word groupoid is used by many universal algebraists, but workers in category theory and related areas object strongly to this usage because they use the same word to mean 'category in which all morphisms are invertible'. The term magma was used by Serre |Lie Algebras and Lie Groups, 1965|." It also appears in Bourbaki's Éléments de mathématique, Algèbre, chapitres 1 à 3, 1970."

    -- From Wikipedia's page for "Magma (algebra)" (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Magma_(algebra)&oldid=848070422)

    July 2, 2018

  • Not what I was expecting.

    June 29, 2018

  • I just found your lovely hollow-land list. Someone had listed seeing, and I was intrigued by the tags.

    June 29, 2018

  • Blast! I nominate you to make the list, bilby.

    June 25, 2018

  • "Heliox generates less airway resistance than air and thereby requires less mechanical energy to ventilate the lungs. "Work of Breathing" (WOB) is reduced. It does this by two mechanisms:

    1.increased tendency to laminar flow;

    2.reduced resistance in turbulent flow."

    -- From Wikipedia's heliox page: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Heliox&oldid=835607282

    June 22, 2018

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "In botany, a name applied by Richard to a second small cotyledon which is found in wheat and some other grasses.

    In embryology, the outer or external blastodermic membrane or layer of cells, forming the ectoderm or epiderm: distinguished at first from hypoblast, then from both hypoblast and mesoblast. See cut under blastocæle."

    June 21, 2018

  • I like your lists.

    June 21, 2018

  • See citation (with a bit about Gauss) on pons asinorum.

    June 8, 2018

  • "While reading Claude Gaspard Bachet de Méziriac's edition of Diophantus' Arithmetica, Pierre de Fermat concluded that a certain equation considered by Diophantus had no solutions, and noted in the margin without elaboration that he had found "a truly marvelous proof of this proposition," now referred to as Fermat's Last Theorem. This led to tremendous advances in number theory, and the study of Diophantine equations ("Diophantine geometry") and of Diophantine approximations remain important areas of mathematical research."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Diophantus&oldid=842662729

    June 7, 2018

  • Cogito ergo can.

    June 5, 2018

  • Aw, shucks. Thanks vm. I love this site and everyone here--and I'm glad you're on the remarkable list, too.

    June 4, 2018

  • "Euler's work touched upon so many fields that he is often the earliest written reference on a given matter. In an effort to avoid naming everything after Euler, some discoveries and theorems are attributed to the first person to have proved them after Euler."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_things_named_after_Leonhard_Euler&oldid=844040346

    June 4, 2018

  • I've been having fun with the "List of things named after Leonhard Euler" page.

    June 4, 2018

  • Define pissfart.

    June 1, 2018

  • Ha--not sure how I missed it. Thank you, bilby!

    May 29, 2018

  • "A significant note, character, sign, token, or indication; a determinative attestation. In logic, to say that a thing has a certain mark is to say that something in particular is true of it. Thus, according to a certain school of metaphysicians, “incognizability is a mark of the Infinite.”"

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    May 22, 2018

  • Any time!

    May 22, 2018

  • That's some etymology.

    May 22, 2018

  • I went to a restaurant yesterday that offered bhendi masala, aloo govi, and baigan vartha.

    May 22, 2018

  • That's the risk (and joy) of open lists (and why open list is my middle name.)

    But, to my shame and horror, I just realized that bilby must have already added foredeck to this list ages ago. I'll still keep searching for fore words, though.

    May 18, 2018

  • I'd forgotten how much I love this list. (I just added foredeck.)

    May 18, 2018

  • Thanks, blby!

    May 18, 2018

  • And fanfare.

    May 17, 2018

  • You're not moved by pathos?

    May 15, 2018

  • "An iron bar bent at right angles at one end, used in the operation of puddling for stirring the melted iron, so as to allow it to be more fully exposed to the action of the air and the lining of the furnace."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    May 14, 2018

  • And I love that this list has rewrite.

    May 14, 2018

  • My new favorite list.

    May 14, 2018

  • *passes out spoons for everyone*

    Do we all have plates? Who still needs fufluns?

    May 14, 2018

  • Brackets around "proto-Wordie und playboy" please--I might have a couple places for it.

    May 14, 2018

  • See semantic satiation.

    May 14, 2018

  • Yes! And/or Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel.

    May 14, 2018

  • Just stopping by to say your prowess with the limericks is astonishing. I am ever in awe.

    May 4, 2018

  • why do you hate freedom

    May 4, 2018

  • Thanks, bilby!

    May 4, 2018

  • How had I never heard of Ebenezer Brewer before? Thank you!!!

    May 3, 2018

  • Each new list you make is my favorite!

    May 3, 2018

  • I think the Moines are allowed to travel where they please.

    May 3, 2018

  • See my-old-kentucky-home; also see word-derby.

    May 2, 2018

  • Also see places-in-oregon by misterbaby.

    May 2, 2018

  • seamount

    May 2, 2018

  • It's something that sounds infinitely more appetizing than a foot-ball.

    April 24, 2018

  • See comments on narrowbody.

    April 19, 2018

  • Brackets around a busybody, please. I have a list for it.

    Also, I looked through nobody's lists, but I didn't see this word there.

    April 19, 2018

  • *presses button politely*

    April 17, 2018

  • Ooh! A delicious food pellet!

    What a great party.

    April 16, 2018

  • *presses button*

    April 16, 2018

  • Is the Italian version called lapotopogigio?

    April 13, 2018

Comments for ruzuzu

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  • I just noticed for the first time your kind comment on my profile!! Thank you!! I like your lists! They've served as many an inspiration for me.

    March 29, 2018

  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • Hey zuzu, hummus detected at botryoidal!

    May 17, 2016

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzuzuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • This made me think of you: http://www.metrolyrics.com/song-ml-video-cea.html

    It was probably the bananaphone.

    June 18, 2015

  • I only just recently noticed that there's a comments section! Yikes! Anyways, unreal-laurens-friend-finder is up and running and needs contributions! So many exclamation points!

    June 16, 2015

  • Eek! TankHughes, I'm glad I was able to point out that list to you, but I'm sorry to contribute to the demise of another. May I console myself with the thought that you'll eventually replace it with a new list for our amusement?

    April 23, 2015

  • I'd respond to you on my list... BUT I DELETED IT! *shock* It made more sense to add my 4 to tbtabby's Location Slang list instead. I'm happy someone else has made a large list that I can legitimately add Canadian tuxedo and Mexican wave to.

    April 21, 2015

  • Thank you for your kind comment of December 15, ruzuzu. It pains me to have overlooked your comment for so long but, in the absence of the Community page, I seem to have been looking in the wrong places for evidence of activity. I had begun to fear that I was the only one still visiting regularly.

    When I last communicated with Erin she wrote that she had a fix for the Community page but was having difficulty getting it installed on the server. I think it is possible we will not have the Community page back until after the holidays. I hope people will not have lost the habit of visiting.

    I hope your holidays are happy ones.

    December 22, 2014

  • Nope. Just dry pita pocket editions.

    August 11, 2014

  • Hey babe, read any good hummus books lately?

    August 10, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby. I needed that.

    July 21, 2014

  • Can you ask around for me then? I'm sure they come from Riga.

    *chortle chortle chortle*

    July 18, 2014

  • I'm really only a half-Lat. I have no idea what a marole is.

    July 18, 2014

  • What is a marole? I thought I might as well ask a Latvian.

    July 18, 2014

  • I don't know of a list for obsolete and disused science terms. Maybe time to start one?

    May 11, 2014

  • I vote we name the inherent sound of fun ruzuzurrus

    March 19, 2014

  • And so do I!

    But I don't understand how we are supposed to find this █████ comment box on one's profile.

    February 21, 2014

  • Hi ruzuzu. Bovine traces detected over at jomo.

    December 13, 2013

  • Hey ruzuzu, I have tripled the length of your calculator words list - hope you like it!

    May 13, 2013

  • I haven't heard her perform. I did have a chance to listen to her read some of her poems. She did them more than justice!

    April 16, 2013

  • I knew she plays the sax. Have you read 'Crazy Brave' yet?

    I wonder how many people realize the etymological significance of the title.

    Playing the sax is 'crazy brave' of course.

    The sax is the ultimate soul instrument with its long neck and throaty sound (see nephesh)

    My niece Ramona has taught me that well!

    She has 'crazy brave' in her blood, too.

    April 16, 2013

  • Me? Why?

    *retaliates with a volley of fufluns*

    January 28, 2013

  • Fonk you, ruzuzu.

    January 28, 2013

  • gallbladder!

    December 13, 2012

  • Spent the past half-hour reading your lists and almost choking on them. Love you!

    December 5, 2012

  • Thanks for sharper ruzuzu!

    November 8, 2012

  • *yawn*

    July 22, 2012

  • Thanks for the red admiral! By the way, I borrowed some of your spiders for my own little collection.

    July 10, 2012

  • Hi ruzuzu.

    It took me a while to find this reply box.

    Thank you for the welcome message.

    Please feel free to comment on my lists or add words to them.

    Robert

    May 22, 2012

  • Huh! Can't even make the pronunciations play at "hot dog"....go figure. ACK!

    April 25, 2012

  • So, the feedback page is otiose? 'Zu, are you able to create pronunciations? I'm having no luck at all. Is it broke? Can we access pronunciations of old?

    April 25, 2012

  • And I less than three you! Miss you guys. You know how it feels sometimes, though... I visit often but can't find anything to add to the conversation.

    I really wish there was an easier way to follow threads. If you don't spend lots of time here, you have to open all links on the Zeitmunity page. There has to be a different way!

    March 29, 2012

  • Thanks, 'zu. I probably would have found it eventually if I'd spent more time. Cheers!

    March 16, 2012

  • oh thank you, good catch!

    February 1, 2012

  • Thanks! Start -geddon ready to add some words...

    http://www.wordnik.com/lists/geddon--1

    January 29, 2012

  • Glad you liked my definition of Bulgar - I'm a total newbie. Don't know how to create a list, or what its purpose is, or how to use it, etc. Tips?

    January 20, 2012

  • What's all the fuss about

    January 14, 2012

  • Perhaps I'm

    January 13, 2012

  • Hmm.

    January 13, 2012

  • Dear ruzuzu,

    You are

    January 13, 2012

  • Thanks, Pro!

    January 13, 2012

  • January 13, 2012

  • I'm happy to hear that! Nobody had said "welcome to Wordnik" before you did, but I've been feeling more and more at home here, lately.

    January 9, 2012

  • *grins*

    January 4, 2012

  • Aww, shucks. You're awfully nifty yourself. :-)

    January 4, 2012

  • Here's another comment. Phew!

    January 3, 2012

  • Eek. I'm at 6666 comments. I was going to make a joke about how that's bad luck, but then my browser stopped working.

    January 3, 2012