ruzuzu has adopted the word madeupical, looked up 101794 words, created 637 lists, listed 31982 words, written 8338 comments, added 8074 tags, and loved 1764 words.

Comments by ruzuzu

  • Excellent!

    May 25, 2016

  • gibe?

    May 24, 2016

  • "The head, hook, or comb of the malleolus or lateral tooth of the mastax of a wheel-animalcule." --Century Dictionary

    May 24, 2016

  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • In Rex Parker's blog about solving crossword puzzles, he complains about a puzzle where 1A "Natick" and 1D "NC Wyeth" share a letter: "I am going to honor this puzzle by naming a crossword constructing principle after one of its elements. I call it: The NATICK Principle. And here it is: If you include a proper noun in your grid that you cannot reasonably expect more than 1/4 of the solving public to have heard of, you must cross that noun with reasonably common words and phrases or very common names." -- http://rexwordpuzzle.blogspot.com/2008/07/sunday-jul-6-2008-brendan-emmett.html

    April 6, 2016

  • Found this list again because Random Word led me to crossruff.

    April 4, 2016

  • Thanks, vm! I'm always on the lookout for them (and my missing socks).

    April 4, 2016

  • "The St. Augustine Monster is one of the earliest examples of a globster—a delightful term referring to an unidentified animal mass that washes up on a beach and results in cryptozoologists speculating about sea monsters. This particular—and particularly large—carcass was discovered by a couple of young boys playing on Anastasia Island, Florida in November 1896. The boys assumed it was a whale, but Dr. De Witt Webb, the founder of the St. Augustine Historical Society and Institute of Science, concluded that it was the remains of a giant octopus and sent photos and a specimen to the Smithsonian labeled as such. Over the next century-plus, various tests claimed to “prove” at one time or another that it was a whale or an octopus, depending on which test was run. Finally, in 2004, it was conclusively proven that the St. Augustine Monster was a whale all along—just like the two boys who discovered it had thought."

    -- http://mentalfloss.com/article/76883/11-weird-things-have-washed-ashore

    April 4, 2016

  • Related to the missing link, no doubt. Thousands of monkeys at thousands of keyboards would be likely to generate bunches of 404's, amirite?

    April 4, 2016

  • I hear you about editing from a phone--but don't give up, MaryW! I enjoy your citations.

    April 4, 2016

  • I'll have my people talk to their people.

    April 4, 2016

  • Wait. I thought you were the manager/Svengali.

    April 1, 2016

  • This works on so many levels. Thanks, qroqqa!

    April 1, 2016

  • I nominate qroqqa to make that list for us!

    March 31, 2016

  • I can't decide which would be a better name for a band: Sad Wallpapers or spam redacted.

    March 31, 2016

  • Thanks, vm!

    March 29, 2016

  • Thank you, bilby. Yes.
    And add away, Alexz!

    March 29, 2016

  • "Pendulum Music (For Microphones, Amplifiers Speakers and Performers) is the name of a work by Steve Reich, involving suspended microphones and speakers, creating phasing feedback tones. The piece was composed in August 1968 and revised in May 1973, and is an example of process music."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pendulum_Music&oldid=686787841

    March 22, 2016

  • I might have gotten around to Poe Dameron, though.

    March 15, 2016

  • My first thought was poet, my second thought was Edgar Allen, and my third thought was the po-po. I never would have gotten to Poe's law. Thanks again, qms.

    March 15, 2016

  • Thanks, qms!

    March 14, 2016

  • I like this definition from the Century: "The manner or style of execution of an engraver: as, a soft burin; a brilliant burin."

    March 14, 2016

  • Actually, I think being puzzled by a puzzle counts as being buffled.

    March 14, 2016

  • Cf. buffle.

    March 14, 2016

  • See how I was baffled over on Sarg.

    March 14, 2016

  • I'm working on a crossword puzzle where one of the clues is "Sarg plaything." The answer is "marionette," but I can't figure out why.

    March 14, 2016

  • That's fantastic! Thanks, vm--I hadn't heard of Old Baldy.

    February 29, 2016

  • "With the skift of snow, temperatures on Thursday are expected to hold in the low 40s."

    -- http://journalstar.com/news/local/a-skift-of-snow-degrees-on-the-horizon/article_1837a68e-45a0-509d-bc4a-ac770281a1bd.html

    February 25, 2016

  • Ach. I forgot what mine was.

    February 23, 2016

  • Cheers!
    *takes a sip*

    February 22, 2016

  • Not that I know of, vm. When I was a kid we used to have big yellow and black hand-painted signs that said "POSTED NO HUNTING" but they never seemed to do much good.

    February 22, 2016

  • I love this. Thanks, vm!

    February 19, 2016

  • This reminds me of our spammer friends.

    February 19, 2016

  • Another interesting name for a band!

    February 19, 2016

  • Comments are a good way to start a conversation--welcome to Wordnik!

    February 19, 2016

  • I've also had chia pudding. It was okay.

    February 19, 2016

  • Generally I'm not a big fan of mucilaginous foods, but I like do like chia--especially when it's in kombucha.

    February 17, 2016

  • Would this be too obvious as a name for a band?

    February 17, 2016

  • Sorry, bilby. I don't know how to crochet. I'm surprised vanderpink couldn't help you out--doesn't she knit pantsuits out of tiger hair or something?

    February 17, 2016

  • Cf. jobbery.

    February 12, 2016

  • Gee! Thanks, mister!

    February 12, 2016

  • Sorry! I know: Better to be seen than heard....
    *scuffs shoe on floor*

    February 11, 2016

  • *stomps in*
    Old enough to know better!
    *stomps out*

    February 10, 2016

  • I like this list!

    February 10, 2016

  • How are we tagging these, again?

    February 10, 2016

  • Oh! I wanna go! I promise I won't disclose the location of your secret lair... again....

    February 10, 2016

  • "Having a conical or rounded projection or protuberance, like a boss."

    -- from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

    January 27, 2016

  • "n. A hood or front-piece made of silk shirred upon whalebones, worn over the front of a bonnet as a protection from sun or wind. Such hoods were in fashion about 1850. Compare ugly, n."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 27, 2016

  • "Vaudeville actress Aida Overton Walker refused to act in the mammy stereotype, though became known for performing the cakewalk with her husband, a dance originally designed to mock slave owners’ gaudy dance moves and later used as a tool to mock black dancers.

    Dora Dean, another black actress of the time, similarly rejected minstrel stereotypes. She performed the cakewalk with her husband and helped influence public views that black women were as elegant as their white peers, evidenced in her professional nickname “The Black Venus.” Both women, though restricted by racist laws and an unfair social order, were able to earn and control assets that were essentially barred from them in other facets of society."

    -- http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-heavily-judged-female-entertainers-who-crushed-stereotypes-in-the-old-west

    January 27, 2016

  • It's actually more of a fuflun run.

    January 27, 2016

  • The Oxford Dictionary of Word Histories tells me "The tack associated with horse-riding was originally dialect in the general sense 'apparatus, equipment' and is a contraction of tackle. The current sense (as in tack room) dates from the 1920s."

    January 26, 2016

  • "In saddlery, a long handle fitted at one end with a knob and at the other with a branch for receiving a small circular tool: used for ornamenting leather."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 26, 2016

  • Just added skin-wool. Yeesh.

    January 26, 2016

  • Here's one for the heraldry lists.

    January 26, 2016

  • List of fictional colors.

    January 20, 2016

  • Oh, fun! Great list.

    January 19, 2016

  • This is great. I might yoink some of these for my against-nature list--thanks!

    January 19, 2016

  • This is my new favorite list.

    January 12, 2016

  • Hm. Could it be endive?

    January 12, 2016

  • "They had viewed, through widely different lenses, the amazing and disturbing and exhilarating American scene, Mencken aiming his binoculars and his bung starter at those well-known and badly battered objects of his eloquent scorn and ridicule, the booboisie, the Bible belt, the professor doctors, the lunatics of the political arena, and the imbeciles infesting literature; while Ross, fascinated by many things that would have bored Mencken, took in the panorama and personalities of New York City and finally the whole American spectacle, interested in everything from a swizzle stick he picked up one day ("There's a story in this damn thing") to the slight swaying of the Empire State Building in a stiff gale."

    --From The Years With Ross by James Thurber

    January 9, 2016

  • "The 65-acre quarry, once the source of a water treatment product called marl, shut down amid the 2007 recession."

    --from http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/73306/new-jersey-fossil-haven-might-reveal-what-killed-dinosaurs

    January 6, 2016

  • See skipvia's comment on plump.

    January 6, 2016

  • Is this why we can't have nice things?

    January 6, 2016

  • "Go softly! hold! stop! not so fast!"

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    December 22, 2015

  • Just in time for the holidays--a turducken cover to match your tea cosy and beer koozie.

    December 22, 2015

  • Thanks, vm!

    *drains*

    December 21, 2015

  • Oh, fun!

    December 21, 2015

  • "The sniffing position has been recommended as optimal for patient intubation and airway management. Historically, the definition of this position is credited to an Irish-born anesthetist, Sir Ivan Magill, who described it as “sniffing the morning air” or “draining a pint of beer.”"

    -- from "Airway Management And Patient Positioning: A Clinical Perspective" by Davide Cattano, MD, PHD, and Laura Cavallone, MD. (http://www.anesthesiologynews.com/download/Positioning_ANGAM12_WM.pdf)

    December 20, 2015

  • "I coined a term a while ago, privelobliviousness, to try to describe the way that being the advantaged one, the represented one, often means being the one who doesn’t need to be aware and, often, isn’t."

    -- "MEN EXPLAIN LOLITA TO ME
    REBECCA SOLNIT: ART MAKES THE WORLD, AND IT CAN BREAK US" December 17, 2015, by Rebecca Solnit.(http://lithub.com/men-explain-lolita-to-me/)

    December 20, 2015

  • Ooh! I'm yoinking this for my waves-and-waveforms list.

    December 15, 2015

  • "Pentaour (Pentaur, Pentewere), the Egyptian scribe, is the least known of the major historic figures on the outside of Nebraska's capitol. An unknown court poet of the 13th-century-B.C. pharaoh, Ramses II, composed a poem celebrating his pharaoh's exploits at the battle of Kadesh in Syria. A copy on papyrus was made of this epic-like poem by the scribe, Pentaour. Early scholars mistakenly thought Pentaour was the author and he still often receives credit. This poem, when coupled with reliefs on various surviving Egyptian temple walls, makes the battle of Kadesh the first battle in history which can be studied for its maneuvers and strategy. History, the record of man's experience, although viewed and interpreted anew through the eyes of each generation, provides both guidance for, and understanding of, the present. On the capitol the scribe Pentaour stands holding the tools of his craft: pen, papyrus and ink pot."

    -- From http://www.nebraskahistory.org/publish/publicat/history/full-text/1981-3-Capitol_Sculpture.pdf

    December 10, 2015

  • "Your half-brother from the same mother. A term used in old legal documents or other discussions of inheritance and succession. Half-siblings of the same mother are "uterine" and of the same father are "consanguine.""

    -- http://mentalfloss.com/article/54486/11-little-known-words-specific-family-members/

    December 10, 2015

  • "Child of your paternal uncle. Also, a child of your own brother. It hasn't gotten a lot of use in the past few centuries, but it was once convenient to have a term for this relationship because it factored into royal succession considerations. The first citation for it in the OED, from 1538, reads, "Efter his patruell deid withoutin contradictioun he wes king.""

    -- http://mentalfloss.com/article/54486/11-little-known-words-specific-family-members/

    December 10, 2015

  • I just found a few more words from this site: http://mentalfloss.com/article/54486/11-little-known-words-specific-family-members/

    December 10, 2015

  • I saw a melopink sunset last night. It was beautiful.

    December 10, 2015

  • The visuals for this are almost as interesting as the related words.

    December 3, 2015

  • Delightful as always, fbharjo.

    December 3, 2015

  • See citation on Markov chain.

    December 3, 2015

  • "A Markov chain (discrete-time Markov chain or DTMC), named after Andrey Markov, is a random process that undergoes transitions from one state to another on a state space. It must possess a property that is usually characterized as "memorylessness": the probability distribution of the next state depends only on the current state and not on the sequence of events that preceded it. This specific kind of "memorylessness" is called the Markov property. Markov chains have many applications as statistical models of real-world processes."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Markov_chain&oldid=693268836

    December 3, 2015

  • So cool! Thank you.

    December 2, 2015

  • "A group of researchers at the University of Alberta have developed what may be the first mathematical theory of humor, all thanks to a funny-sounding nonsense word: snunkoople.

    Psychology professor Chris Westbury was studying people with aphasia, a disorder affecting language comprehension, when he noticed something strange. Subjects were asked to read strings of letters and identify whether they were real words. After a while, Westbury noticed subjects seemed to laugh at certain nonsense words—snunkoople in particular."


    -- http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/71851/researchers-have-developed-mathematical-method-identifying-certain-kinds-humor

    December 2, 2015

  • I'm in.

    November 23, 2015

  • Aw. Thanks, theanadroid--this is a fun list!

    November 23, 2015

  • Your wish, my command, &c.

    November 17, 2015

  • Maybe. I think my friend settled on outright, which seemed appropriate to whatever the context was.

    November 17, 2015

  • Hmm--synthesis has promise.

    November 17, 2015

  • Me too.

    November 17, 2015

  • Hello, snack. Nice to meet you!

    November 17, 2015

  • Probably. But somehow they don't seem parallel--not that words have to be all matchy-matchy to be antonyms.

    November 17, 2015

  • "The phrase OODA loop refers to the decision cycle of observe, orient, decide, and act, developed by military strategist and USAF Colonel John Boyd. Boyd applied the concept to the combat operations process, often at the strategic level in military operations. It is now also often applied to understand commercial operations and learning processes. The approach favors agility over raw power in dealing with human opponents in any endeavor."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=OODA_loop&oldid=682717349

    November 17, 2015

  • Ooh! A tasty food pellet!

    November 17, 2015

  • Great. Now I'm hungry.

    November 16, 2015

  • Is there a good single-word antonym for this? Maybe wholesale? (Asking for a friend.)

    November 16, 2015

  • "Ballas or shot bort is a term used in the diamond industry to refer to shards of non-gem-grade/quality diamonds. It comprises small diamond crystals that are concentrically arranged in rough spherical stones with a fibrous texture. Ballas is hard, tough, and difficult to cleave. It is mostly found in Brazil and South Africa."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ballas&oldid=573450822

    November 16, 2015

  • Ooh! I have no idea, but now I really want to know too--there's great potential for some poem with a sea-bear in it.

    November 13, 2015

  • See citation on kaolin.

    November 12, 2015

  • "Porcelain is traditionally made from two essential ingredients: kaolin, also called china clay, a silicate mineral that gives porcelain its plasticity, its structure; and petunse, or pottery stone, which lends the ceramic its translucency and hardness. Kaolin is the more essential ingredient—a potter’s clay is meant to exist, like his glazes, in variations—and it takes its name from a mountain in Jingdezhen, China, where porcelain was first created, more than a thousand years ago, called Gaoling, which means “high ridge.” The name was recorded incorrectly by a Jesuit priest, Pere d’Entrecolles, in the early eighteenth century, in his letters home describing the Chinese technique."

    -- http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-european-obsession-with-porcelain

    November 12, 2015

  • *brings out the tray full of fancy fufluns*

    November 10, 2015

  • Ooh! Look! A delicious phood pellet!

    November 10, 2015

  • *press*

    November 10, 2015

  • Did you say phood pellet? I wonder what would happen if I were to press that button.

    November 10, 2015

  • *press*

    November 10, 2015

  • Brackets around "phuphlun" please. I have a list for it.

    November 10, 2015

  • "So what to make of the current state of these medieval buildings-as-museums? Certainly, good preservation practices will ensure a long life for the aged stones. But there is also a sense in which the medieval buildings have been deadened by their modern lives as display pieces. Old material given life through new use, called spolia, is, after all, very medieval. The altar at Sant-Miquel-de-Cuixà, the very heart of the religious life of the monastery, was itself made of part of a Roman column. Reuse did not erase the old meaning, it augmented the new one, though of course that column did not mean the same thing to a medieval person as to a Roman, nor the library wall the same thing as a medieval one. Even now, many San Franciscans shared memories of crawling over the medieval stones in their park as children, of the blocks as meeting places and landmarks. On the other hand, maybe the distinction between the museumified version of these places and their "freer" state is not so different, since New Yorkers were equally eager to share memories of their childhood trips to The Cloisters."

    -- http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/in-the-early-1900s-dozens-of-centuriesold-european-buildings-came-to-america-where-is-medieval-america-now

    November 10, 2015

  • Ha!

    November 6, 2015

  • "The term bateria means “drum kit” in Portuguese and Spanish. In Brazil, the word is also used for a form of Brazilian samba band, the percussion band or rhythm section of a Samba School. It might also mean battery.

    Baterias are also used to accompany the Brazilian martial art, capoeira."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bateria

    November 5, 2015

  • See high-toned.

    November 3, 2015

  • Pearls of wisdom. Thanks, qms!

    November 3, 2015

  • Ha!

    November 3, 2015

  • Wait--I thought it was turtles all the way down. Mind? Blown.

    November 3, 2015

  • Bilby Ranch Lake Conservation Area Parking Permit Inspector Station.

    November 2, 2015

  • I've never been the the Bilby Ranch Lake Conservation Area, but I imagine that it's close to a place called Hidden Valley.

    November 2, 2015

  • "One: as, the tae half or the tither (the one half or the other)."
    --from the Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    November 1, 2015

  • "Something done according to Cocker was done properly, according to established rules or what was considered to be correct.

    The etymological story starts in 1678, when John Hawkins published the manuscript of a book which Edward Cocker had left at his death two years earlier. Cocker had been the master of a grammar school in Southwark, across the Thames from the City of London, and Hawkins was his successor in the post. (It has been claimed that the book was actually by Hawkins, trading on Cocker’s name, but the current view is that Cocker really had written it.) The book, after the fashion of the time, had an expansive title — Cocker’s Arithmetick: Being a Plain and familiar Method suitable to the meanest Capacity for the full understanding of that Incomparable Art, as it is now taught by the ablest School-masters in City and Country."

    From World Wide Words (http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-acc1.htm)

    October 29, 2015

  • Or firepower?

    October 29, 2015

  • Haha! Well, I suppose rock 'n roll and moldy mayhem are inextricably linked. We could always start a new genre.

    October 29, 2015

  • Wanna start a band? I had one going over on almost Solveig for a while.

    October 28, 2015

  • Here I am visiting this list again. It was the word latericumbent that brought me here again, but I'm also pleased to see milk sickness.

    October 28, 2015

  • These are great, TankHughes! I'm a fan of dendrochronology and Carolingian minuscule, too.

    October 28, 2015

  • Oh! How nice! We haven't had a hilarious misunderstanding for ages.

    October 28, 2015

  • Fun! I was excited to think that the four ancient elements might show up--there's fire-cock and air-cock. Unfortunately, even though watercock exists, it is a bird. And we would have to fudge a bit with sludge-cock for earth (though I am obviously game if you are).

    October 28, 2015

  • There should be a list of hats that remind us of bilby. I'd add this and trilby.

    October 28, 2015

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:
    "n. A small protuberance. See the quotation, and hump, n.; 2."

    October 27, 2015

  • Just ran across turbinal and wondered whether you'd listed it yet. You had, of course.

    October 27, 2015

  • See bettabilitarianism.

    October 27, 2015

  • See comment on bettabilitarianism.

    October 27, 2015

  • On page 217 of my copy of The Metaphysical Club by Louis Menand there's a bit about Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Charles Sanders Peirce, and Chauncey Wright that describes bettabilitarianism: "Holmes eventually lost sympathy with the views of his friend William James, which he thought too hopeful and anthropocentric. He never had much interest in Peirce; he thought Peirce's genius "overrated." But he continued to admire Wright, and years later cited him as the inspiration for what he liked to call his philosophy of "bettabilitarianism." "Chauncey Wright|,| a nearly forgotten philosopher of real merit, taught me when young that I must not say necessary about the universe, that we don't know whether anything is necessary or not," he wrote to Frederick Pollock in 1929, when he was in his eighties. "So that I describe myself as a bettabilitarian. I believe that we can bet on the behavior of the universe in its contract with us. We bet we can know what it will be. That leaves a loophole for free will--in the miraculous sense--the creation of a new atom of force, although I don't in the least believe in it.""

    October 27, 2015

  • See the list pretentious-words-i-have-used-or-hope-to-use-when-discussing-operas for dontcry's comment.

    October 23, 2015

  • I think posttentious is my new favorite word.

    October 23, 2015

  • This is lovely. I adore coloratura.

    October 23, 2015

  • Great! Thank you.

    October 23, 2015

  • I'm sure I've mentioned this somewhere before, but I once tried to play "throated" for a bingo in Scrabble, and my fellow players didn't believe it was a real word. My feathers are still ruffled.

    Also, chained_bear's earlier comment is totally ferruginous.

    October 20, 2015

  • Excellent. You might appreciate reesetee's bird-wirds-adjectives list.

    October 20, 2015

  • Nice list!

    October 20, 2015

  • Ew.

    October 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby.

    October 20, 2015

  • Brackets around "hillbilly lilies" please.

    October 19, 2015

  • I'm reading something where the writer consistently uses "to that ends" instead of "to that end." Is this valid? Where does this phrase come from, anyway? (It's math, isn't it? It's always math.)

    October 19, 2015

  • Parley in the parlor?

    October 16, 2015

  • Those visuals are lovely!

    October 16, 2015

  • So, of course, I read that too fast and wondered what "googleflight" could be.

    October 16, 2015

  • Outstanding--that really stands out.

    October 16, 2015

  • We won't stand for it.

    October 16, 2015

  • Yoink! Thanks.

    October 16, 2015

  • I assume the "are" in the Century definition should be "arc."

    October 16, 2015

  • I like this one from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia: "In mathematics, the occurrence of closed paths."

    October 16, 2015

  • Thanks for your addition of John Horton Conway to my mathematics--6 list.

    And welcome to Wordnik!

    October 16, 2015

  • See comments on mu.

    October 14, 2015

  • This is obviously the best of all possible lists.

    October 13, 2015

  • Ah. But what about yarn? "n. Bundles of fibers twisted together, and which in turn are twisted in bundles to form strands, which in their turn are twisted or plaited to form rope."

    October 7, 2015

  • Maybe it is strand. The Century told me a strand can be "A number of yarns or wires twisted together to form one of the parts of which a rope is twisted; hence, one of a number of flexible things, as grasses, strips of bark, or hair, twisted or woven together. Three or more strands twisted together form a rope. See cut under crown, v. t., 9." Not sure what the "v. t., 9" referred to, but there's something under crown about making a knot with some of the strands.

    October 7, 2015

  • I have two questions that I'm too lazy to look up: first, is there a word for the strands that go together to make rope or thread? I'm fine if the word turns out to be strand, but I'd love it if there were some more complicated way to say "I was trying to thread a needle, but only one ________ went through the eye."

    Second, is there a better word for going through the motions or being on autopilot? Sometimes I'll be reading a page and realize that my eyes have been moving, but I haven't actually retained anything. It's something like active listening, or focusing. Is it focusing? Man. I think I need more coffee.

    October 7, 2015

  • Oh! That's fantastic. I wouldn't have known if you hadn't pointed it out--but from now on I'll be tempted to use pixilated intentionally.

    Hilarious.

    October 7, 2015

  • See antediluvian. Also see citation on drift.

    October 6, 2015

  • "Back in the early nineteenth century . . . geologists in Europe and the Great Lakes region of North America began to take note of so-called erratic boulders, which were composed very differently from the local bedrock on which they rested. Monoliths of granite sat, illogically, on limestone; slabs of schist, improbably, on sandstone. The most reasonable interpretation of these foreign rocks, in the context of the contemporary understanding of Earth's history, was that they had been washed in by the waters of the Great Flood of Noah. Geologists called such flotsam "drift," and an early version of the geologic time scale included a period known as the Antediluvian--that is, "before the deluge.""

    -- Stone's Throw, by Marcia Bjornerud, The New Yorker. (http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/a-tsunami-written-in-stone)

    October 6, 2015

  • Sometimes I can tell when I'm dreaming because I try to read something and the words are indecipherable. The other night I dreamed that I really needed to read an important text message, so the sender resorted to using a flower bed in a garden. The message was "white snake root will do if the ageratum in the border hasn't filled in yet."

    September 25, 2015

  • Also, see citation on apophenia.

    September 25, 2015

  • "In 1958, German neurologist Klaus Conrad coined the term Apophänie to describe schizophrenic patients’ tendency to imbue random events with personal meaning. An apophany has the form factor of an epiphany—the sense of breakthrough, of events finally coming together and making sense—but without any relationship to real explanations. But though Conrad focused on instances of apophany occurring with psychosis, the phenomenon he described applies to the ill and the well alike. Now called “apophenia,” the instinct to pick out patterns from meaningless information is essentially universal."

    -- http://hazlitt.net/feature/goes-all-way-queen-puzzle-book-drove-england-madness

    September 25, 2015

  • To which I'll add more from Wikipedia.

    "In I Am a Strange Loop, Hofstadter defines strange loops as follows: “And yet when I say "strange loop", I have something else in mind — a less concrete, more elusive notion. What I mean by "strange loop" is — here goes a first stab, anyway — not a physical circuit but an abstract loop in which, in the series of stages that constitute the cycling-around, there is a shift from one level of abstraction (or structure) to another, which feels like an upwards movement in a hierarchy, and yet somehow the successive "upward" shifts turn out to give rise to a closed cycle. That is, despite one's sense of departing ever further from one's origin, one winds up, to one's shock, exactly where one had started out. In short, a strange loop is a paradoxical level-crossing feedback loop. (pp. 101-102)"

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Strange_loop&oldid=664233306

    September 15, 2015

  • I'd add a "hahahaewwwwww."

    September 15, 2015

  • "Prosthaphaeresis was an algorithm used in the late 16th century and early 17th century for approximate multiplication and division using formulas from trigonometry. For the 25 years preceding the invention of the logarithm in 1614, it was the only known generally applicable way of approximating products quickly. Its name comes from the Greek prosthesis and aphaeresis, meaning addition and subtraction, two steps in the process."
    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Prosthaphaeresis&oldid=664935222

    September 14, 2015

  • "Another medieval term for the pons asinorum was Elefuga which, according to Roger Bacon, comes from Greek elegia misery, and fuga Latin for flight, that is "flight of the wretches". Though this etymology is dubious, it is echoed in Chaucer's use of the term "flemyng of wreches" for the theorem.

    There are two possible explanations for the name pons asinorum, the simplest being that the diagram used resembles an actual bridge. But the more popular explanation is that it is the first real test in the Elements of the intelligence of the reader and functions as a "bridge" to the harder propositions that follow. Gauss supposedly once espoused a similar belief in the necessity of immediately understanding Euler's identity as a benchmark pursuant to becoming a first-class mathematician."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pons_asinorum&oldid=674772528

    September 14, 2015

  • "n. A post in the bridge of a pulp-vat on which the mold is placed to drain."
    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    September 14, 2015

  • "A web decoration or stabilimentum (plural: stabilimenta) is a conspicuous silk structure included in the webs of some species of orb-web spider. Web decorations consist of silk ribbons, silk tufts, prey remains, egg sacs, and plant detritus."
    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_decoration

    September 3, 2015

  • Pronounced like foaling, no doubt.

    August 31, 2015

  • Ha!

    August 31, 2015

  • I added Grover's Mill because of The War of the Worlds broadcast from 1938.

    Okay. Actually, that's a lie. I added it because of Buckaroo Bonzai.

    August 31, 2015

  • I love this one from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia: "n. A kind of writing used in the text or body of clerkly manuscripts; formal handwriting; now, especially, a writing or type of a form peculiar to some class of old manuscripts; specifically, in heraldry, Old English black-letter: as, German or English text; a text (black-letter) R or T."

    August 28, 2015

  • I had never looked up the etymology for this before--I might have guessed something to do with text, but not weaving.

    August 28, 2015

  • Nice!

    August 28, 2015

  • I just saw it as I was paging through my Webster's New World Dictionary (College Edition). I also found Bifrost and biffin.

    August 28, 2015

  • I'm surprised this hasn't been listed yet.

    August 28, 2015

  • Czy znasz historię wielkiego złego wilka i trzech spamerów?

    August 27, 2015

  • This part reminds me of junior high math class: "A good criteria summoned Double Elliptic Curve, cultivated in the charity, was there while travelling in order to appreciation from the Native Company connected with Paradigm also Knowledge united associated with a number of good enough means in favor of cranking out accidental amounts."

    August 24, 2015

  • And I like gówno. Here's what my dictionary has to say: "gown~iarz: mp wulg. 1. young shitass. 2. Br. nightman. ~o* -wien shit."

    August 24, 2015

  • Ach, co za piękny kawałek kału!

    I actually bought a Polish/English dictionary to try to figure some of this stuff out--if they're going to spam us, I might as well have some fun and learn something new, right?

    For instance, as I was looking up the translation for feces, I discovered the word excrementitious. Isn't that divine?

    August 24, 2015

  • Powiedz mi więcej o Polsce. Co możesz zobaczyć? Las? Morze? Spam? Chleb żytni? Buraki?

    Ach. Teraz jestem głodny.

    August 24, 2015

  • I love this list.

    August 18, 2015

  • Tworzyw sztucznych do pakowania spam? To sprawia, że chcę śpiewać. Co to za piosenka o sokołami?

    Hej, hej, hej sokoły
    Omijajcie góry, lasy, doły.
    Dzwoń, dzwoń, dzwoń dzwoneczku,
    Mój stepowy skowroneczku.

    Hej, hej, hej sokoły
    Omijajcie góry, lasy, doły.
    Dzwoń, dzwoń, dzwoń dzwoneczku,
    Mój stepowy
    Dzwoń, dzwoń, dzwoń



    August 18, 2015

  • Dziękuję, QMS!

    August 18, 2015

  • Thanks! You've just given me an epiphany about Leonard Cohen's Famous Blue Raincoat song:

    Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
    She said that you gave it to her
    That night that you planned to go clear
    Did you ever go clear?

    August 18, 2015

  • Witam, Próbuję nauczyć się mówić po polsku. Czy możesz nam powiedzieć coś więcej na temat innych produktów mięsnych, oprócz spam? Jestem szczególnie zainteresowany priapitc elfy, które pływają w kadziach z fasoli.

    August 17, 2015

  • I love this one from the Century: "n. The extraction of roots from powers: the reverse of involution (which see)."

    August 17, 2015

  • See evolution.

    August 17, 2015

  • To get to the other pride.

    August 15, 2015

  • To get to the other guide.

    August 15, 2015

  • To get to the other slide.

    August 15, 2015

  • I didn't know there was a word for these. Thanks!

    August 14, 2015

  • Wait. Why did the bilby cross the road?

    August 14, 2015

  • It's also a Pantone color (7457 is a sort of robin's egg blue).

    August 13, 2015

  • Haha! I just got flagged as spam for trying to add something over on 7457.

    August 13, 2015

  • Also, chwas.

    August 13, 2015

  • I didn't see anything in my compact version of the OED (though, granted, it's hard to see anything in there without a magnifying glass). I did find chwine and chwot, though--so that was fun.

    August 13, 2015

  • I like your comment on perfluorooctanoic acid.

    August 13, 2015

  • See citation on abbey-lubber.

    August 13, 2015

  • How interesting! Have you seen Lubber? http://www.nebraskahistory.org/sites/mnh/weird_nebraska/have_you_seen.htm

    August 13, 2015

  • I think Yeats would agree that it's "a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi." (See http://www.potw.org/archive/potw351.html.)

    August 12, 2015

  • I'm still adding it to my list.

    August 12, 2015

Comments for ruzuzu

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  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • Hey zuzu, hummus detected at botryoidal!

    May 17, 2016

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzuzuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • This made me think of you: http://www.metrolyrics.com/song-ml-video-cea.html
    It was probably the bananaphone.

    June 18, 2015

  • I only just recently noticed that there's a comments section! Yikes! Anyways, unreal-laurens-friend-finder is up and running and needs contributions! So many exclamation points!

    June 16, 2015

  • Eek! TankHughes, I'm glad I was able to point out that list to you, but I'm sorry to contribute to the demise of another. May I console myself with the thought that you'll eventually replace it with a new list for our amusement?

    April 23, 2015

  • I'd respond to you on my list... BUT I DELETED IT! *shock* It made more sense to add my 4 to tbtabby's Location Slang list instead. I'm happy someone else has made a large list that I can legitimately add Canadian tuxedo and Mexican wave to.

    April 21, 2015

  • Thank you for your kind comment of December 15, ruzuzu. It pains me to have overlooked your comment for so long but, in the absence of the Community page, I seem to have been looking in the wrong places for evidence of activity. I had begun to fear that I was the only one still visiting regularly.

    When I last communicated with Erin she wrote that she had a fix for the Community page but was having difficulty getting it installed on the server. I think it is possible we will not have the Community page back until after the holidays. I hope people will not have lost the habit of visiting.

    I hope your holidays are happy ones.

    December 22, 2014

  • Nope. Just dry pita pocket editions.

    August 11, 2014

  • Hey babe, read any good hummus books lately?

    August 10, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby. I needed that.

    July 21, 2014

  • Can you ask around for me then? I'm sure they come from Riga.

    *chortle chortle chortle*

    July 18, 2014

  • I'm really only a half-Lat. I have no idea what a marole is.

    July 18, 2014

  • What is a marole? I thought I might as well ask a Latvian.

    July 18, 2014

  • I don't know of a list for obsolete and disused science terms. Maybe time to start one?

    May 11, 2014

  • I vote we name the inherent sound of fun ruzuzurrus

    March 19, 2014

  • And so do I!
    But I don't understand how we are supposed to find this █████ comment box on one's profile.

    February 21, 2014

  • Hi ruzuzu. Bovine traces detected over at jomo.

    December 13, 2013

  • Hey ruzuzu, I have tripled the length of your calculator words list - hope you like it!

    May 13, 2013

  • I haven't heard her perform. I did have a chance to listen to her read some of her poems. She did them more than justice!

    April 16, 2013

  • I knew she plays the sax. Have you read 'Crazy Brave' yet?
    I wonder how many people realize the etymological significance of the title.
    Playing the sax is 'crazy brave' of course.
    The sax is the ultimate soul instrument with its long neck and throaty sound (see nephesh)
    My niece Ramona has taught me that well!
    She has 'crazy brave' in her blood, too.

    April 16, 2013

  • Me? Why?
    *retaliates with a volley of fufluns*

    January 28, 2013

  • Fonk you, ruzuzu.

    January 28, 2013

  • gallbladder!

    December 13, 2012

  • Spent the past half-hour reading your lists and almost choking on them. Love you!

    December 5, 2012

  • Thanks for sharper ruzuzu!

    November 8, 2012

  • *yawn*

    July 22, 2012

  • Thanks for the red admiral! By the way, I borrowed some of your spiders for my own little collection.

    July 10, 2012

  • Hi ruzuzu.

    It took me a while to find this reply box.
    Thank you for the welcome message.
    Please feel free to comment on my lists or add words to them.

    Robert

    May 22, 2012

  • Huh! Can't even make the pronunciations play at "hot dog"....go figure. ACK!

    April 25, 2012

  • So, the feedback page is otiose? 'Zu, are you able to create pronunciations? I'm having no luck at all. Is it broke? Can we access pronunciations of old?

    April 25, 2012

  • And I less than three you! Miss you guys. You know how it feels sometimes, though... I visit often but can't find anything to add to the conversation.

    I really wish there was an easier way to follow threads. If you don't spend lots of time here, you have to open all links on the Zeitmunity page. There has to be a different way!

    March 29, 2012

  • Thanks, 'zu. I probably would have found it eventually if I'd spent more time. Cheers!

    March 16, 2012

  • oh thank you, good catch!

    February 1, 2012

  • Thanks! Start -geddon ready to add some words...

    http://www.wordnik.com/lists/geddon--1

    January 29, 2012

  • Glad you liked my definition of Bulgar - I'm a total newbie. Don't know how to create a list, or what its purpose is, or how to use it, etc. Tips?

    January 20, 2012

  • What's all the fuss about <3' secret messages? Ah! I see! Can it really be as simple as hiding messages behind' hearts?

    January 14, 2012

  • Perhaps I'm <3' not' as smart as I think I am.

    January 13, 2012

  • Hmm.

    January 13, 2012

  • Dear ruzuzu,

    You are <3' the opposite of' a terrible bore.

    Yours with no <3' thing but' fondness,

    Yarb.

    January 13, 2012

  • Thanks, Pro!

    January 13, 2012

  • <3'<3'<3'

    January 13, 2012

  • I'm happy to hear that! Nobody had said "welcome to Wordnik" before you did, but I've been feeling more and more at home here, lately.

    January 9, 2012

  • *grins*

    January 4, 2012

  • Aww, shucks. You're awfully nifty yourself. :-)

    January 4, 2012

  • Here's another comment. Phew!

    January 3, 2012

  • Eek. I'm at 6666 comments. I was going to make a joke about how that's bad luck, but then my browser stopped working.

    January 3, 2012

  • kumanan brought it to my attention that the palindrome code was not ignoring spaces, so I fixed it. You'll be seeing "And it's a palindrome" on multi-word palindrome pages by the end of the day. In the interim, here's a list to celebrate to new feature: http://www.wordnik.com/lists/semordnilap

    November 30, 2011