ruzuzu has adopted the word madeupical, looked up 0 words, created 774 lists, listed 37697 words, written 10260 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 2323 words.

Comments by ruzuzu

  • Ha!

    January 16, 2020

  • Uh... so has anyone created a ferret list yet?

    January 15, 2020

  • Would you consider adding ferret?

    January 15, 2020

  • I love that one definition has "abounding" and the other has "a bounding."

    January 15, 2020

  • Brackets around moozuzu, please. I'm sure there's a list where you can stick it.

    January 15, 2020

  • Funny that this is about moles instead of cows.

    January 13, 2020

  • What a great list! My favorite is the Diet of Worms, but it seems as if you're going for something else here.

    January 13, 2020

  • Ooh! That's fun.

    January 10, 2020

  • Uh, I don't know much about heraldic symbolism--but it sure seems like if Wordnik were to have some sort of coat of arms, then this is the way to include fufluns.

    January 3, 2020

  • Harlem, New York.

    January 3, 2020

  • Texas Red or sulforhodamine 101 acid chloride is a red fluorescent dye, used in histology for staining cell specimens, for sorting cells with fluorescent-activated cell sorting machines, in fluorescence microscopy applications, and in immunohistochemistry.

    -- Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Texas_Red&oldid=897205418)

    Also see texas red.

    December 30, 2019

  • Thanks for this list, hh. Just arrived here (again) after looking up mullet.

    December 11, 2019

  • I've never had any, but that doesn't mean it isn't out there somewhere.

    December 10, 2019

  • You might have to travel to nebraksa to find them.

    December 5, 2019

  • This is a great list!

    December 4, 2019

  • See Daimonelix.

    December 3, 2019

  • While exploring the western part of Nebraska, Barbour collected dozens of examples of the giant spiral structures, reporting on them in 1892 and naming them Daimonelix (Greek for “devil’s screw,” often spelled Daemonelix). Their origin was a mystery and there was nothing else like them in the fossil record. After first considering them as possible remains of giant freshwater sponges, Barbour surmised that the fossils of Daimonelix were the remains of plants, possibly root systems, because he had discovered plant tissues inside the helices.

    A year later, the legendary American vertebrate paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope rejected Barbour’s interpretation of the fossils, noting that “the most probable explanation of these objects seems to be that they are the casts of the burrows of some large rodent.”

    -- From https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/how-scientists-resolved-mystery-devils-corkscrews-180973487

    See, also, ichnology.

    December 3, 2019

  • An animal can only die once, and when it does, there’s a vanishingly slim chance that it will become a fossil: Far, far more often than not, an animal’s carcass will decay and rot until there’s little proof that it ever existed at all. While it’s alive, though, a creature can stamp proof of itself all across the landscape. Ichnology is the study of those preserved tracks, burrows, and other “trace fossils”—and it’s a way for researchers to visualize an animal’s behavior and biomechanics without a body in sight.

    -- https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/white-sands-fossil-footprints

    December 3, 2019

  • See comments on précising.

    December 3, 2019

  • It's hard to narrow down my favorites--qms was prolific, and each one was a gem.

    November 25, 2019

  • Ha! I just noticed "e-mail message."

    November 25, 2019

  • Has anyone made a list of Middle English words yet?

    November 25, 2019

  • I concur.

    November 25, 2019

  • Do bilbies prefer the DownUnderDome?

    November 25, 2019

  • Thanks, vm--you just answered a question I didn't even know I had!

    November 22, 2019

  • When I first saw this, I read it as "antisurgeon," and now I'm trying to come up with a joke about my aunt who is a Christian Scientist and loves caviar. (My auntie who's anti-surgeon but pro-sturgeon, &c.)

    November 22, 2019

  • Thanks, fb! Had I slept longer, I might have convinced my friend to study Solon.

    November 22, 2019

  • Dreamed I was at a gas station by a college campus, consoling a friend who’d been told she wasn’t allowed to study Aristotle any longer. I led her over to the used dvds, trying to cheer her up. One of her classmates was there—she had just been to a lecture about poetry. I asked whether there had been any mention of cauliflower as a symbol. She was just starting to say, “Right, so as you know, cauliflower is a soltentanue,” and I was just about to say, “Do you mean solanaceae? I thought it was cruciferous,” but my alarm woke me up before I could question her further.

    November 21, 2019

  • Oof. *favorited*

    November 18, 2019

  • Does that mean a flaneur is a person who loves spending time on flan?

    November 18, 2019

  • Would you consider cul-de-sac?

    November 15, 2019

  • Ha. It's like if you took longer and made it even lonnnnnger.

    November 15, 2019

  • Uh, I think the best coffee to accompany custard-filled fufluns is definitely kopi-LEWDwak. Amirite? (Wocka wocka.)

    November 5, 2019

  • Fantastic--and I love that you're the first person to list Björk!

    November 4, 2019

  • See citation on volvelle.

    November 4, 2019

  • Leibniz’s central argument was that all human thoughts, no matter how complex, are combinations of basic and fundamental concepts, in much the same way that sentences are combinations of words, and words combinations of letters. He believed that if he could find a way to symbolically represent these fundamental concepts and develop a method by which to combine them logically, then he would be able to generate new thoughts on demand.

    The idea came to Leibniz through his study of Ramon Llull, a 13th century Majorcan mystic who devoted himself to devising a system of theological reasoning that would prove the “universal truth" of Christianity to non-believers.

    Llull himself was inspired by Jewish Kabbalists’ letter combinatorics . . . which they used to produce generative texts that supposedly revealed prophetic wisdom. Taking the idea a step further, Llull invented what he called a volvelle, a circular paper mechanism with increasingly small concentric circles on which were written symbols representing the attributes of God. Llull believed that by spinning the volvelle in various ways, bringing the symbols into novel combinations with one another, he could reveal all the aspects of his deity.

    -- https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/robotics/artificial-intelligence/in-the-17th-century-leibniz-dreamed-of-a-machine-that-could-calculate-ideas

    November 4, 2019

  • Nice!

    November 4, 2019

  • Rivoli!

    October 31, 2019

  • Dear bilby,

    I think your ears are lovely. Now make that list for us!

    Yours truly, ruzuzu

    October 25, 2019

  • From "Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

    noun

    Plural form of 2-8-0+0-8-2."

    October 16, 2019

  • You might enjoy madmouth's love-across-kingdoms list--which goes both ways (I think it has animals named after plants, too).

    October 16, 2019

  • I have a list of those! (See found-poetry.)

    October 10, 2019

  • "frequentive (not comparable)

    Misspelling of frequentative."

    -- https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=frequentive&oldid=54581305

    October 4, 2019

  • "from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

    1662, in sense “flutter as blown by wind”, as whiff +‎ -le (“(frequentive)”) and (onomatopoeia) sound of wind, particularly a leaf fluttering in unsteady wind; compare whiff. Sense “something small or insignificant” is from 1680."

    October 4, 2019

  • Not what I was expecting.

    October 1, 2019

  • "|F|rom The Century Dictionary.

    noun

    Same as swingletree."

    "|F|rom the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

    noun

    Same as whippletree."

    October 1, 2019

  • Thanks, ry!

    September 25, 2019

  • It's an open list--have at!

    September 24, 2019

  • *favorited*

    September 23, 2019

  • I like that you're the first person to list sieve of Eratosthenes.

    September 23, 2019

  • I like how if you combine Chimborazo and Rizzo, it almost sounds like Ratso Rizzo.

    September 23, 2019

  • How do we feel about "how"?

    September 20, 2019

  • And minerals are here: interrogative-minerals-d7PvM26GxlBl.

    September 20, 2019

  • All right. I've started the plant list here: interrogative-plants-GGm7K8ksj_aG.

    September 20, 2019

  • I see your point. Should we have a second list for plants?

    September 20, 2019

  • Ooh. That's definitely how I'll start pronouncing it now.

    *wanders over to wereweasel*

    September 19, 2019

  • (A HORRIFYING CRY OF A WOLF!)

    INGA: Werewolf!

    FREDDY: Werewolf?

    IGOR: There.

    FREDDY: What?

    IGOR: (Pointing to the woods.) There, wolf. (Pointing to the castle.) There, castle.

    FREDDY: Why are you talking that way?

    IGOR: I thought you wanted to.

    FREDDY: No, I don't want to.

    IGOR: Suit yourself... I'm easy.

    --From the movie Young Frankenstein (1974)

    September 19, 2019

  • That's excellent!

    September 19, 2019

  • So, let's see: whincow... werewolf.

    Are there any "what" or "why" animals? (I'm guessing who is reserved for owls.)

    September 19, 2019

  • Agreed! Yarb is excellent.

    September 18, 2019

  • Compare aleatoric.

    September 17, 2019

  • See comment on aleatoric.

    September 17, 2019

  • Wikipedia also offers the following etymology: "The term became known to European composers through lectures by acoustician Werner Meyer-Eppler at the Darmstadt International Summer Courses for New Music in the beginning of the 1950s. According to his definition, "a process is said to be aleatoric ... if its course is determined in general but depends on chance in detail" (Meyer-Eppler 1957, 55). Through a confusion of Meyer-Eppler's German terms Aleatorik (noun) and aleatorisch (adjective), his translator created a new English word, "aleatoric" (rather than using the existing English adjective "aleatory"), which quickly became fashionable and has persisted (Jacobs 1966). More recently, the variant "aleatoriality" has been introduced (Roig-Francolí 2008, 340)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aleatoric_music&oldid=896913303

    September 17, 2019

  • See agaric.

    September 17, 2019

  • Copper arsenite.

    September 9, 2019

  • Scheele's Green.

    September 9, 2019

  • One appears in the Cate Blanchett movie about Elizabeth I.

    I wonder whether dresses dyed with copper arsenite (or Scheele's Green) would fit.

    September 9, 2019

  • That's fantastic. There should be a word for when you're sure you've coined something new, come here to claim it, then see it's already listed.

    September 9, 2019

  • See definition on Cryptozoic.

    September 4, 2019

  • Cf. psephite.

    September 4, 2019

  • From the Century Dictionary:

    "In petrography, in the quantitative system of classification, a division of igneous rocks lower than the ‘order,’ based on the character of the chemical bases in the preponderating group of standard minerals in each class. See rock."

    You rang?

    You rock!

    September 4, 2019

  • See sodium silicate.

    September 4, 2019

  • See soluble glass.

    September 4, 2019

  • See comment on green vitriol.

    August 28, 2019

  • See comment on green vitriol.

    August 28, 2019

  • See comment on green vitriol.

    August 28, 2019

  • See comment on green vitriol.

    August 28, 2019

  • "Alum and green vitriol (iron sulfate) both have sweetish and astringent taste, and they had overlapping uses. Therefore, through the Middle Ages, alchemists and other writers do not seem to have discriminated the two salts accurately from each other. In the writings of the alchemists we find the words misy, sory, and chalcanthum applied to either compound; and the name atramentum sutorium, which one might expect to belong exclusively to green vitriol, applied indifferently to both.

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Alum&oldid=907117212

    August 28, 2019

  • I nominate you to make that list! (Should I ask whether anyone has a theremin I can borrow?)

    August 23, 2019

  • Funny that there’s a Wiktionary entry that says this is “obsolete,” but nothing from the Century, etc.

    August 21, 2019

  • Excellent.

    *polishes tiara*

    *polishes off a tray full of Fufluns*

    August 16, 2019

  • "Edward Elzear "Zez" Confrey (April 3, 1895 – November 22, 1971) was an American composer and performer of novelty piano and jazz music. His most noted works were "Kitten on the Keys" and "Dizzy Fingers.""

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Zez_Confrey&oldid=908338871

    August 16, 2019

  • 47

    August 13, 2019

  • I think teanner sounds lovely.

    But I have so many questions:

    Is this English tea and dinner business like the supper/dinner question I deal with in the middle of America?

    Must one wear a tiara to tea?

    When is bilby inviting us all over?

    Should I bring fufluns?

    August 12, 2019

  • I was just looking at the word arm and realized that it could be anagrammed to ram and mar. Is there a word for words where each and every variation in the order of the letters leads to another word?

    August 1, 2019

  • "Visual comparisons by the human eye and a suitable, uniform light source is one method to assess how good an old, now discontinued pigment relates to a new substitute. Another way is to take a measurement using a device called a spectrophotometer that assesses the color reflectance at wavelength segments within the range of visible light detectable by a human eye."

    -- https://www.nga.gov/conservation/materials-study-center/amrsc-historic-modern-pigments.html

    July 29, 2019

  • I’d been wondering, too. Such sad news.

    Thanks for letting us know, Erin.

    July 27, 2019

  • Cabbage and turnips. See citation on quodlibet.

    July 23, 2019

  • One of the Goldberg Variations by J.S. Bach is a quodlibet. Wikipedia says, "This quodlibet is based on multiple German folk songs, two of which are Ich bin solang nicht bei dir g'west, ruck her, ruck her ("I have so long been away from you, come closer, come closer") and Kraut und Rüben haben mich vertrieben, hätt mein' Mutter Fleisch gekocht, wär ich länger blieben ("Cabbage and turnips have driven me away, had my mother cooked meat, I'd have opted to stay"). The others have been forgotten. The Kraut und Rüben theme, under the title of La Capricciosa, had previously been used by Dieterich Buxtehude for his thirty-two partite in G major, BuxWV 250." (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Goldberg_Variations&oldid=903488896)

    July 23, 2019

  • word to the mother

    July 18, 2019

  • See echo.

    July 8, 2019

  • See Echo.

    July 8, 2019

  • "Depending on the tectonic environment, diapirs can range from idealized mushroom-shaped Rayleigh--Taylor-instability-type structures in regions with low tectonic stress such as in the Gulf of Mexico to narrow dikes of material that move along tectonically induced fractures in surrounding rock."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Diapir&oldid=885376369

    July 8, 2019

  • Ooh! I'd forgotten about scytale. Nice!

    July 2, 2019

  • "In crystalline materials, Umklapp scattering (also U-process or Umklapp process) is a scattering process that results in a wave vector (usually written k) which falls outside the first Brillouin zone.

    . . . .

    "The name derives from the German word umklappen (to turn over). Rudolf Peierls, in his autobiography Bird of Passage states he was the originator of this phrase and coined it during his 1929 crystal lattice studies under the tutelage of Wolfgang Pauli. Peierls wrote, "...I used the German term Umklapp (flip-over) and this rather ugly word has remained in use...."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Umklapp_scattering&oldid=885935301

    June 17, 2019

  • That explains a lot about my weekend. I would also like to question Wordnik about a few missing socks from my last load of laundry.

    June 17, 2019

  • Oh! It's like The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog.

    June 10, 2019

  • I do like the caer part of this--at first it reminded me of the Spanish verb for "to fall," but on Wikipedia there's a bit about it as Welsh for -caster* (though in a castle-y way).

    *"Caer (Welsh pronunciation: kɑːɨr; Old Welsh: cair or kair) is a placename element in Welsh meaning "stronghold", "fortress", or "citadel", roughly equivalent to the Old English suffix now variously written as -caster, -cester, and -chester." (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Caer&oldid=895292287)

    June 10, 2019

  • "When asked about his father-in-law President Donald Trump, Kushner told CNN's Van Jones: "He's a black swan. He's been a black swan all his life.""

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jared_Kushner&oldid=898710548

    June 3, 2019

  • Compare magic user.

    June 3, 2019

  • Worm married Dorothea Fincke, the daughter of a friend and colleague, Thomas Fincke. Thomas Fincke was a Danish mathematician and physicist, who invented the terms 'tangent' and 'secant' and who taught at the University of Copenhagen for more than 60 years.

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ole_Worm&oldid=882439160

    May 31, 2019

  • Also, see, stalactite.

    May 31, 2019

  • See Ole Worm.

    May 31, 2019

  • "The term "stalactite" was coined in the 17th century by the Danish Physician Ole Worm, who coined the Latin word from the Greek word σταλακτός (stalaktos, "dripping") and the Greek suffix -ίτης (-ites, connected with or belonging to)."

    -- From Wikipedia's "Stalactite" entry (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stalactite&oldid=895316956), which sends us off to the wonderful Online Etymology Dictionary, where (at https://www.etymonline.com/word/stalactite#etymonline_v_21976) we find this: ""hanging formation of carbonite of lime from the roof of a cave," 1670s, Englished from Modern Latin stalactites (used 1654 by Olaus Wormius), from Greek stalaktos "dripping, oozing out in drops," from stalassein "to trickle," from PIE root *stag- "to seep, drip, drop" (source also of German stallen, Lithuanian telžiu, telžti "to urinate") + noun suffix -ite (1). Related: Stalactic; stalactitic."

    May 31, 2019

  • Also see parasitic oscillation.

    May 28, 2019

  • "Parasitic oscillation is an undesirable electronic oscillation (cyclic variation in output voltage or current) in an electronic or digital device. It is often caused by feedback in an amplifying device."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Parasitic_oscillation&oldid=886517785

    May 28, 2019

  • Are we comparing apples and oranges?

    May 15, 2019

  • Oh, yeah? Try lamp egg, Mr. Apt Leggy.

    May 15, 2019

  • Regmaglypts are "thumbprint-sized indentations in the surface of larger meteorites formed by ablation as the meteorite passes through a planet's atmosphere, probably caused by vortices of hot gas."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_meteoritics#Regmaglypts

    May 14, 2019

  • Is it a shortened form of almost all?

    But, also, it's ringing bells for me about statistics and inferences and Thomas Bayes and (of course!) Charles Sanders Peirce.

    May 14, 2019

  • Yeehaw! Thanks, Buckaroo Bilby.

    May 14, 2019

  • Shoot! Well, I still nominate you to, er, put your own brand on it, VM.

    May 10, 2019

  • I'm having fun looking--in the meantime, I nominate you to make one!

    May 9, 2019

  • Makes me think of arcades ambo.

    May 9, 2019

  • Also, bilby, is “courier numbat” the same as a pneumatic tube?

    May 5, 2019

  • Thank you, qms.

    May 5, 2019

  • No worries! Sorry about the attention span and memory loss. Your limerick game is spot on, and your comments are always great.

    Besides--I assume that the ruzuzu born into the timeline of snotty goblets and snooty relatives is probably off wasting precious resources on fancy automobiles and sparkly tiaras.

    I'm glad to be here. I'm glad you're here, too.

    May 3, 2019

  • Wait. Was it goblets or gobbles? I feel my entire destiny rides on this question.

    May 3, 2019

  • What a thrilling list!

    May 3, 2019

  • By a strange coincidence, "snotty gobbles" was one of my nicknames in high school.

    May 3, 2019

  • *trips silent alarm*

    May 3, 2019

  • “The systems use a dog's breakfast of custom codes and command system, with no standardization, let alone basic security. All systems pose some risk of vulnerabilities, but in this case it's like they didn't even try.“

    — “Security researchers reveal defects that allow wireless hijacking of giant construction cranes, scrapers and excavators” (https://boingboing.net/2019/03/15/not-even-trying-2.html/)

    March 17, 2019

  • Delightful as always, qms!

    March 15, 2019

  • Fun! That's definitely earlier than the OED's first example for it, which is from 1944.

    March 15, 2019

  • I was sure this was a bell-shaped hat.

    March 6, 2019

  • Perfection! I wish there were a way to set up an alert every time there's a new list from biocon.

    March 6, 2019

  • *swoons*

    February 8, 2019

  • Well done, qms!

    February 8, 2019

  • Just got cohomology as a random word and thought of this.

    February 6, 2019

  • I do.

    Wait.

    Does that mean I just read about myself? Ach. *added*

    February 6, 2019

  • Well, I don't know about that, but there certainly was a time when I was known as the Wordnik Mustard Girl.

    edit: Corn on the side.

    February 5, 2019

  • You could also turn it into a corndog, which would go well with mustard. Silage on the side.

    February 4, 2019

  • Cf. comment on Haverford.

    February 1, 2019

  • I'm so glad it worked out--commas are such pesky creatures.

    February 1, 2019

  • Kuzma's mother or Kuzka's mother (Russian: Кузькина мать; Kuzka is a diminutive of the given name Kuzma) is a part of the Russian idiomatic expression "to show Kuzka's mother to someone" (Russian: Показать кузькину мать (кому-либо)), an expression of an unspecified threat or punishment, such as "to teach someone a lesson" or "to punish someone in a brutal way". It entered the history of the foreign relations of the Soviet Union as part of the image of Nikita Khrushchev, along with the shoe-banging incident and the phrase "We will bury you".

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kuzma%27s_mother&oldid=878213572 (which also tells us the following: "Because of the phrase's use in Cold War diplomacy, it became a code word for the atomic bomb. In particular, the Tsar Bomba 50 MT yield thermonuclear test device was nicknamed "Kuzka's mother" by its builders.")

    February 1, 2019

  • Psst... note the comma at the end.

    February 1, 2019

  • I was going to see what it would be in Roman numerals, but apparently anything bigger than 3,999 is just too hard to figure out.

    January 24, 2019

  • chomp?

    January 18, 2019

  • alogical?

    January 17, 2019

  • Mottled tarmac.

    January 16, 2019

  • Cy Twombly

    January 16, 2019

  • "A heavy low carriage mounted on three wheels, the forward wheel being pivoted to facilitate changes of direction: used for transporting cannon and ammunition within the galleries of permanent works."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 15, 2019

  • "The play between the spindle of the De Bange gas-cheek and its cavity in the breech-screw: it is expressed in decimal parts of an inch, and is measured by the difference between the diameters of the spindle and its cavity."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 15, 2019

  • Also see fomes.

    January 15, 2019

  • emetic ipecac

    January 15, 2019

  • Montserrat Caballé.

    January 14, 2019

  • Portal tomcat.

    January 14, 2019

  • Forsooth.

    January 14, 2019

  • "Lenoks (otherwise known as Asiatic trout or Manchurian trout) are a genus, Brachymystax, of salmonid fishes native to rivers and lakes in Mongolia, Kazakhstan, wider Siberia (Russia), Northern China, and Korea."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lenok&oldid=853445221

    January 10, 2019

  • Dude.

    January 10, 2019

  • Anyone have a mellophone I can borrow?

    January 10, 2019

  • See Ten.

    December 28, 2018

  • Thank you, Buzzbyfeed.

    December 28, 2018

  • Brackets around Buzzbyfeed, please.

    December 27, 2018

  • I'm imagining the sitcom now. Equal parts Will & Grace, Cagney & Lacey, and Turner & Hooch, "Crime & Elly" is the story of Elly, a by-the-book manager at a coffee shop, who teams up with "Crime," a corgi who happens to be an undercover detective.

    December 26, 2018

  • One of the managers came over and fixed it--it'd be great if her name were Nelly.

    December 26, 2018

  • Two days ago, I went to a coffee shop. The guy at the cash register was trying to ring me up, but his computer screen kept giving him trouble. "Criminelly," he said.

    I'd only ever heard it as criminently. I assume any variations come from criminy.

    December 26, 2018

  • I'm not sure. Perhaps someone should fund a research trip for me.

    December 20, 2018

  • "A Chrismon tree is an evergreen tree often found in the chancel or nave of a church during Advent and Christmastide."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chrismon_tree&oldid=871803470

    December 20, 2018

  • As with the Christmas tree, the evergreen tree itself, for Christians, "symbolizes the eternal life Jesus Christ provides". However, the Chrismon tree differs from the traditional Christmas tree in that it "is decorated only with clear lights and Chrismons made from white and gold material", the latter two being the liturgical colours of the Christmas season.

    -- From https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chrismon_tree&oldid=871803470 (footnote references removed)

    December 20, 2018

  • Wow. Bilby has some amazing reviews in the example sentences:

    "The Bilby also serves as a cover for a restaurant highchair." -- Ten Tips for All Day Shopping with a Toddler | Thingamababy

    "The Bilby slides on and off in seconds, without straps or snaps." -- Ten Tips for All Day Shopping with a Toddler | Thingamababy

    "The back of the cover has a huge 2-foot opening for you attach the extra Bilby strap or the cart strap." -- Review: Bilby Shopping Cart Liner | Thingamababy

    December 19, 2018

  • This is the Best list.

    December 18, 2018

  • I love that the reverse dictionary options for this are Lachesis and mammillated.

    December 18, 2018

  • Haha! I know it *seems* like I'd seen a bit of gin before I wrote that, but it was just cold medicine, I swear.

    Also, I love this site and everyone here. For real.

    December 18, 2018

  • See cornel. Also see citation on sloe.

    December 17, 2018

  • Also, I was just scrolling past this word again and read it as "slaw-gin" (like sloe gin, maybe).

    December 17, 2018

  • No bears were harmed in the making of this list.

    December 17, 2018

  • Do you know, I think gin is what led me to this old wordie site in the first place. See, I'd been at a pesto-making party with a bunch of former English professors, and they were trying to figure out the etymology for cotton gin. The hosts had a compact edition of the OED, but it's so hard to read those entries--even with the magnifying glass--so I was looking it up for them on my phone. It was probably yarb's comments on gin that made me think I wanted to read more here. But I forgot about the site for a while. Eventually I got fascinated by something else--peacock mantis shrimp probably--and someone over on Twitter who followed wordie and wordnik reminded me this place existed. When I came back, I found bilby's animal-identity-crisis list, &c., and the rest, as they say, was history.

    December 17, 2018

  • "Specifically, a machine for mixing various substances. See malaxator."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    December 17, 2018

  • I wonder whether Predator had a preditor.

    December 14, 2018

  • See bogue.

    December 13, 2018

  • "One who brings persons into a place or condition of restraint, in order to subject them to swindling, forced labor, or the like; especially, one who, for a commission, supplies recruits for the army or sailors for ships by nefarious means or false inducements; a decoy; a kidnapper. Such practices have been suppressed in the army and navy, and made highly penal in connection with merchant ships."

    -- From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    December 13, 2018

  • The words found under "same context" are fantastic:

    67-year-old

    abstinent

    arvernian

    be-ribboned

    chid

    crutched

    curmudgeonly

    ever-popular

    ever-youthful

    gray-uniformed

    moire

    n'est-ce

    natural-born

    nursemaid

    pro-german

    rebuffingthe

    shrivelled-up

    unfrocked

    vivant

    yellow-bearded

    your

    December 13, 2018

  • So, cake, obviously. But also Witter Bynner, who appears in the index of a book I've been reading--even though he's nowhere in the text--and who apparently wrote a play called Cake as revenge against Mabel Dodge Luhan. (See https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Witter_Bynner&oldid=867008750)

    December 11, 2018

  • Yum! In Latvian, the word for cake sounds a bit like "kooks."

    December 11, 2018

  • Delightful! I accept.

    Should we make a party? I could probably whip up some fufluns.

    December 11, 2018

  • "From Middle English cake, from Old Norse kaka ("cake") . . . ."

    Remind me to think twice before I call something a "piece of cake."

    December 11, 2018

  • All these pepparkakors and finska kakors and shortcakes and piparkūkas have me wondering (yet again) about the etymology for cake.

    December 11, 2018

  • My ancient Betty Crocker cookbook calls these "Nut-studded butter strips from Finland."

    December 11, 2018

  • Ooh, bilby bilby, it's a wild world.

    December 11, 2018

  • Oh! I wonder whether they're like Latvian piparkūkas.

    December 11, 2018

  • Wait. So is it like a cowcatcher? (Add it if you like--it's an open list.)

    December 7, 2018

  • R'amen.

    December 5, 2018

  • *curtseys*

    December 5, 2018

  • She probably got catfished.

    December 5, 2018

  • Thanks, bilby. It was you're something of a hotdog, aren't you (as originally seen in one of dontcry's comments over on spaghetti).

    December 4, 2018

  • Also see ha-ha.

    December 4, 2018

  • From the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English:

    "n. One of a breed of fancy frilled pigeons allied to the owls and turbits, having the body white, the shoulders tricolored, and the tail bluish black with a large white spot on each feather."

    December 3, 2018

  • Alloxan was used in the production of the purple dye murexide, discovered by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1776. Murexide is the product of the complex in-situ multistep reaction of alloxantin and gaseous ammonia. Murexide results from the condensation of the unisolated intermediate uramil with alloxan, liberated during the course of the reaction.

    Scheele sourced uric acid from human calculi (such as kidney stones) and called the compound lithic acid. William Prout investigated the compound in 1818 and he used boa constrictor excrement with up to 90% ammonium acid urate.

    In the chapter "Nitrogen" of his memoir The Periodic Table, Primo Levi tells of his futile attempt to make alloxan for a cosmetics manufacturer who has read that it can cause permanent reddening of the lips. Levi considers the droppings of pythons as a source for uric acid for making alloxan, but he is turned down by the director of the Turin zoo because the zoo already has lucrative contracts with pharmaceutical companies, so he is obliged to use chickens as his source of uric acid. The synthesis fails, however, "and the alloxan and its resonant name remained a resonant name."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Alloxan&oldid=822802116

    November 30, 2018

  • For more, see alloxan.

    November 30, 2018

  • I find myself at quite a loss

    To decide upon this evening’s sauce.

    What goes with spaghett?

    Is it just mignonette?

    Perhaps I’ll decide by coin toss.

    November 29, 2018

  • Cf. spaghett.

    November 29, 2018

  • This "noodle" is vaguely spaghetty,

    Though my soup should have been alphabetty.

    That cook in the back

    Looks a bit like yak--

    Perhaps this stray hair's from a yeti.

    November 29, 2018

  • I might have a lead on a guy who can loan me a pyrophone for the closing number. It's funny how you can just casually mention the name almost Solveig and people go out of their way.

    November 29, 2018

  • I was at a local coffee shop's self-service station this morning--trying to decide whether to get dark roast, medium roast, or the flavor of the day. I hate having to choose, so I just got a bit of each. The person behind me in line said, "Wait. Is that like a suicide, but with coffee?" I laughed and said, "Yes!"

    I don't remember when I first heard "suicide" as the term for combining all the soda pop options from a fountain machine--it's common enough. But it still kinda weirds me out.

    November 29, 2018

  • Didn't ibex dearie sing "Peel Me A Grape"?

    November 26, 2018

  • There ought. There's afflictions-of-the-realm and lots of old pharmacy terms formerly-used-in-medicine, but I still nominate you to create a more specific one for our amusement.

    November 26, 2018

  • Good one, qms. Yeehaw!

    November 23, 2018

  • Your citations are inspiring. I’ve been lazy about using the blockquote HTML tag—but no more! Thank you for your precision and dedication.

    November 23, 2018

  • Misnegation is an obscure word for a common phenomenon. You won’t find it in dictionaries, but you can probably figure out that it means some kind of ‘incorrect negation’ – not to be confused with double negatives (‘multiple negation’), criticism of which tends to be dubious.

    So what exactly are we talking about here?

    Misnegation is where we say something with negatives in it that don’t add up the way we intend. We lose track of the logic and reverse it inadvertently. For example, I might say that the likelihood of misnegation cannot be understated, when I mean it cannot be overstated – it is, in fact, easily understated.

    https://stancarey.wordpress.com/2018/11/19/misnegation-should-not-be-overestimated-i-mean-underestimated/amp

    November 23, 2018

Show 200 more comments...

Comments for ruzuzu

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • I just noticed for the first time your kind comment on my profile!! Thank you!! I like your lists! They've served as many an inspiration for me.

    March 29, 2018

  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • Hey zuzu, hummus detected at botryoidal!

    May 17, 2016

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzuzuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • This made me think of you: http://www.metrolyrics.com/song-ml-video-cea.html

    It was probably the bananaphone.

    June 18, 2015

  • I only just recently noticed that there's a comments section! Yikes! Anyways, unreal-laurens-friend-finder is up and running and needs contributions! So many exclamation points!

    June 16, 2015

  • Eek! TankHughes, I'm glad I was able to point out that list to you, but I'm sorry to contribute to the demise of another. May I console myself with the thought that you'll eventually replace it with a new list for our amusement?

    April 23, 2015

  • I'd respond to you on my list... BUT I DELETED IT! *shock* It made more sense to add my 4 to tbtabby's Location Slang list instead. I'm happy someone else has made a large list that I can legitimately add Canadian tuxedo and Mexican wave to.

    April 21, 2015

  • Thank you for your kind comment of December 15, ruzuzu. It pains me to have overlooked your comment for so long but, in the absence of the Community page, I seem to have been looking in the wrong places for evidence of activity. I had begun to fear that I was the only one still visiting regularly.

    When I last communicated with Erin she wrote that she had a fix for the Community page but was having difficulty getting it installed on the server. I think it is possible we will not have the Community page back until after the holidays. I hope people will not have lost the habit of visiting.

    I hope your holidays are happy ones.

    December 22, 2014

  • Nope. Just dry pita pocket editions.

    August 11, 2014

  • Hey babe, read any good hummus books lately?

    August 10, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby. I needed that.

    July 21, 2014

  • Can you ask around for me then? I'm sure they come from Riga.

    *chortle chortle chortle*

    July 18, 2014

  • I'm really only a half-Lat. I have no idea what a marole is.

    July 18, 2014

  • What is a marole? I thought I might as well ask a Latvian.

    July 18, 2014

  • I don't know of a list for obsolete and disused science terms. Maybe time to start one?

    May 11, 2014

  • I vote we name the inherent sound of fun ruzuzurrus

    March 19, 2014

  • And so do I!

    But I don't understand how we are supposed to find this █████ comment box on one's profile.

    February 21, 2014

  • Hi ruzuzu. Bovine traces detected over at jomo.

    December 13, 2013

  • Hey ruzuzu, I have tripled the length of your calculator words list - hope you like it!

    May 13, 2013

  • I haven't heard her perform. I did have a chance to listen to her read some of her poems. She did them more than justice!

    April 16, 2013

  • I knew she plays the sax. Have you read 'Crazy Brave' yet?

    I wonder how many people realize the etymological significance of the title.

    Playing the sax is 'crazy brave' of course.

    The sax is the ultimate soul instrument with its long neck and throaty sound (see nephesh)

    My niece Ramona has taught me that well!

    She has 'crazy brave' in her blood, too.

    April 16, 2013

  • Me? Why?

    *retaliates with a volley of fufluns*

    January 28, 2013

  • Fonk you, ruzuzu.

    January 28, 2013

  • gallbladder!

    December 13, 2012

  • Spent the past half-hour reading your lists and almost choking on them. Love you!

    December 5, 2012

  • Thanks for sharper ruzuzu!

    November 8, 2012

  • um............................... hi

    October 4, 2012

  • "ruzuzu has looked up 87912 words"

    OMG get a life u loser. seriously who looks up words and then comonts on them like...pfft

    July 24, 2012

  • *yawn*

    July 22, 2012

  • Ruzuzu you smell and your stupid and i think ur dumb 2 44s i mene wtf u evn @m a& u no wht i mee????????.....

    July 22, 2012

  • Thanks for the red admiral! By the way, I borrowed some of your spiders for my own little collection.

    July 10, 2012

  • Hi ruzuzu.

    It took me a while to find this reply box.

    Thank you for the welcome message.

    Please feel free to comment on my lists or add words to them.

    Robert

    May 22, 2012

  • Hello,

    Am a young single girl never married seeking true love for a long term relationship with marriage potentials,i am happy to contact you because you cut my interest! i will love us to be good friends or a lot more, you can contact me through.(aisha.arop@hotmail.com)so that i will send you my photos,till i hear from you, bye and kisses!

    Miss Aisha

    May 16, 2012

  • Huh! Can't even make the pronunciations play at "hot dog"....go figure. ACK!

    April 25, 2012

  • So, the feedback page is otiose? 'Zu, are you able to create pronunciations? I'm having no luck at all. Is it broke? Can we access pronunciations of old?

    April 25, 2012

  • And I less than three you! Miss you guys. You know how it feels sometimes, though... I visit often but can't find anything to add to the conversation.

    I really wish there was an easier way to follow threads. If you don't spend lots of time here, you have to open all links on the Zeitmunity page. There has to be a different way!

    March 29, 2012

  • Thanks, 'zu. I probably would have found it eventually if I'd spent more time. Cheers!

    March 16, 2012

  • oh thank you, good catch!

    February 1, 2012

  • Thanks! Start -geddon ready to add some words...

    http://www.wordnik.com/lists/geddon--1

    January 29, 2012

  • Glad you liked my definition of Bulgar - I'm a total newbie. Don't know how to create a list, or what its purpose is, or how to use it, etc. Tips?

    January 20, 2012

  • hututu....??

    search engine optimization service

    January 15, 2012

  • What's all the fuss about

    January 14, 2012

  • Perhaps I'm

    January 13, 2012

  • Hmm.

    January 13, 2012

  • Dear ruzuzu,

    You are

    January 13, 2012

  • Thanks, Pro!

    January 13, 2012

  • January 13, 2012