Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The virtue of "practical wisdom" as posited by Aristotle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Practical judgment; the faculty of conducting one's self wisely.

Etymologies

From Ancient Greek φρόνησις (phronēsis, "practical wisdom"), from φρονεῖν (phronein, "to think"), from φρήν (phrēn, "mind"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This last explanation seems decidedly preferable because the terms here used, particularly the word phronesis prudence, is not in its ordinary sense properly referable to God.

    A Commentary on the Epistle to the Ephesians

  • They leave out something essential--what classical philosopher Aristotle called practical wisdom his word was phronesis.

    Barry Schwartz: Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing

  • With wisdom the apostle connects phronesis, which is here used much in the same sense as sunesis in Col. 1, 9, ` That ye may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding. '

    A Commentary on the Epistle to the Ephesians

  • Pickstock argues that these two responsibilities are bridged with the notion of phronesis or prudence:

    TELOSscope: The Telos Press blog

  • Aristotle called it "phronesis," or practical wisdom.

    Q&A: What Would Plato Have Done?

  • He takes issue with Bent Flyvbjerg's book, Making Social Science Matter: Why Social Inquiry Fails and How it Can Succeed Again, and his advocacy of "phronesis".

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • Matt, that makes me think maybe there is something to the notion of phronesis, which can be identified here by its complete absence.

    Discourse.net: Let's Ban Footnotes Too!

  • Overall we need to remember that knowledge management is, to use the Greek, a matter of phronesis or practical wisdom; its the exercise of judgement and that can only be developed in action through the acquisition of habits.

    enowning

  • Laitin characterizes the method of phronesis as one that is sensitive to context and that pays close attention to the singular and specific features of a particular social process -- for example, the positioning that occurs as a city decides on its economic development strategy.

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • So the method of phronesis is intentionally not aiming to discover regularities across a set of instances, but rather to uncover some specific features of a particular ongoing process.

    Archive 2008-04-01

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