Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A simple eye, found in many invertebrates, consisting of a number of sensory cells and often a single lens.
  • noun A marking that resembles an eye, as on the tail feathers of a male peacock; an eyespot.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A little eye; an eye-spot; a stemma; one of the minute simple eyes of insects and various other animals.
  • noun One of the simple elements or facets of a compound eye. See cut of compound eye, under eye.
  • noun In Hydromedusæ, a pigment-spot at the base of the tentacles, or combined with other marginal bodies, in some cases provided with refractive structures which recall the crystalline cones of some other low invertebrates. Also called ocellicyst.
  • noun One of the round spots of varied color, consisting of a central part (the pupil) framed in a peripheral part, such as characterize the tail of a peacock or the wing of an argus-pheasant.
  • noun See the adjectives.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A little eye; a minute simple eye found in many invertebrates.
  • noun An eyelike spot of color, as those on the tail of the peacock.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A simple eye consisting of a single lens and a small number of sensory cells
  • noun An eyelike marking in the form of a spot or ring of colour, as on the wing of a butterfly or the tail of a peacock

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an eyelike marking (as on the wings of some butterflies); usually a spot of color inside a ring of another color
  • noun an eye having a single lens

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin, diminutive of oculus, eye; see okw- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin ocellus ("little eye"), from oculus ("eye")

Examples

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