Comments by ruzuzu

  • This SPAM is so last year. We should all get our electrical power from confectio Damocritis. (And bezoars are far better for misplacing pounds--though I hear people have also used tapeworms for that purpose.)

    July 9, 2014

  • Wait.... confectio Damocritis is from Damascus? Ungh! Bilby! Why didn't you say anything before?!

    (Welcome to Wordnik, Dimshaw. You'll fit right in here.... would you like some fufluns?)

    July 8, 2014

  • Uh, it is now. See ruzuzus-friday-night-parlour-games.

    July 2, 2014

  • I know not Lethe nor Nepenthe. (It always makes me think of Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.)

    July 2, 2014

  • "The name derives from "pot ash", which refers to plant ashes soaked in water in a pot, the primary means of manufacturing the product before the industrial era. The word "potassium" is derived from potash."
    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Potash&oldid=614276607

    July 1, 2014

  • Hello, would you be interested in completing a short survey? Have you ever heard of confectio Damocritis? Do you know its origin or etymology? Who was this Damocritis anyway? Thank you for your time.

    July 1, 2014

  • I've received no responses to my survey questions. Perhaps I should switch to English for a time (unless folks would prefer Latvian, Spanish, or Mandarin). I might also condense my focus just a bit. Okay. Ready? Here we go:

    Hello, would you be interested in completing a short survey? Have you ever heard of confectio Damocritis? Do you know its origin or etymology? Who was this Damocritis anyway? Thank you for your time.

    July 1, 2014

  • See urad, urad dal, black gram, black lentil.

    July 1, 2014

  • Aw, shucks. Thanks, qms--but I'm sure all the credit goes to erinmckean.

    And stellar list, pterodactyl! *favorited*

    June 30, 2014

  • Witaj, byłbyś zainteresowany wypełniając krótką ankietę? Oto pytania: Jak odkryłaś wordnik? Czy już zapisał się na "słowo dnia" funkcji? Czy próbowałeś za pomocą confectio Damocritis do utraty wagi? Jak dowiedziałeś się o confectio Damocritis? Dziękujemy za zainteresowanie.

    June 30, 2014

  • Witaj, byłbyś zainteresowany wypełniając krótką ankietę? Oto pytania: Jak odkryłaś wordnik? Czy już zapisał się na "słowo dnia" funkcji? Czy próbowałeś za pomocą confectio Damocritis do utraty wagi? Jak dowiedziałeś się o confectio Damocritis? Dziękujemy za zainteresowanie.

    June 30, 2014

  • Thanks, Abby!

    June 26, 2014

  • Dear Abby,
    Is it wrong to try to spam the spammers? I used google translate to create a little survey for them in Polish about what brings them here and whether they've ever heard of confectio Damocritis as a weight-loss strategy. Is this cure worse than the disease? And what is confectio Damocritis anyway?
    Signed,
    Mystery Meat and Greet

    June 26, 2014

  • Witaj, byłbyś zainteresowany wypełniając krótką ankietę? Oto pytania: Jak odkryłaś wordnik? Czy już zapisał się na "słowo dnia" funkcji? Czy próbowałeś za pomocą confectio Damocritis do utraty wagi? Jak dowiedziałeś się o confectio Damocritis? Dziękujemy za zainteresowanie.

    June 26, 2014

  • Witaj, byłbyś zainteresowany wypełniając krótką ankietę? Oto pytania: Jak odkryłaś wordnik? Czy już zapisał się na "słowo dnia" funkcji? Czy próbowałeś za pomocą confectio Damocritis do utraty wagi? Jak dowiedziałeś się o confectio Damocritis? Dziękujemy za zainteresowanie.

    June 26, 2014

  • candy

    June 25, 2014

  • Ha!

    June 25, 2014

  • Witaj, byłbyś zainteresowany wypełniając krótką ankietę? Oto pytania: Jak odkryłaś wordnik? Czy już zapisał się na "słowo dnia" funkcji? Czy próbowałeś za pomocą confectio Damocritis do utraty wagi? Jak dowiedziałeś się o confectio Damocritis? Dziękujemy za zainteresowanie.

    June 25, 2014

  • I was just reading about forte and foible, then trying to remember whether there were any sword lists around here. You're awesome, bear.

    June 24, 2014

  • Add your two cents...

    June 24, 2014

  • Rhello, Marky!

    June 24, 2014

  • Are these OSPD, OWL, or SOWPODS?

    June 24, 2014

  • Also see quesadilla.

    June 16, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby.
    *begins work on "The Legend of the Nose-Acorn Pulling Bilby"*

    June 6, 2014

  • Hunh. Who knew?

    June 5, 2014

  • Cf. self-similarity, scale invariance.

    June 5, 2014

  • Isn't this the Old French form of fufluns?

    June 3, 2014

  • I adore your comment over on lie--it's the sort of thing that lets me know we're among friends here.

    June 3, 2014

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia definition for Leigh:
    "n. A different spelling of lea, meadow or pasture, used as a suffix (-leigh, also -ley, -ly) in English place-names, especially in Devonshire: as, Chudleigh, Chulmleigh, Calverleigh.
    n. An obsolete preterit of lie."

    June 3, 2014

  • See epidote.

    June 3, 2014

  • Thank you, _bear. Add anything you like!

    June 3, 2014

  • I've added this to my list of long-s-examples. Please feel free to add any others you might come acrofs.

    June 2, 2014

  • Adorable!

    May 31, 2014

  • "An exclamation denoting surprise, joy, or grief. Both as uttered and as written, it expresses a great variety of emotions, determined by the tone or the context. When repeated, ha, ha, it is an expression of laughter, satisfaction, or triumph, sometimes of derisive laughter; or sometimes it is equivalent to “Well, it is so.

    -- from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

    May 28, 2014

  • See ha.

    May 28, 2014

  • "Stone walls do not a prison make,
    Nor iron bars a cage
    Minds innocent and quiet take
    That for an hermitage."

    -- from Richard Lovelace's "To Althea, from Prison"

    May 28, 2014

  • Ooh! Fun!

    May 28, 2014

  • "n. A market; a market-place: in this sense extant in several place-names, as Cheapside and Eastcheap in London, Chepstow, etc."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    May 16, 2014

  • Thanks! I'm especially fond of butter of antimony.

    May 15, 2014

  • We have a start from alexz: obsolete---disused-science-terms.

    May 14, 2014

  • These are so great. I've been obsessed with timber words lately, so I'll probably be yoinking a bunch of these--thanks!

    May 14, 2014

  • Oh, wow! I love this. Thanks, alexz.

    May 14, 2014

  • I have to admit I'm daunted by how many obsolete and disused science terms there could be--would it make sense to break them down into categories, or should we just have one huge list?

    May 14, 2014

  • Just found templet.

    May 14, 2014

  • "Same as Timber worm, below."

    -- from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

    May 14, 2014

  • "n. plural The whole of the timbers disposed in the walls of a house, as bond-timbers, wall-plates, lintels, and templets."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    May 14, 2014

  • "The moisture in stone freshly cut from the quarry. When this has dried out, the stone is harder to work."

    --Dictionary of Building. 2nd ed. Edited by John S. Scott. London: Newnes-Butterworths, 1974, 272.

    May 8, 2014

  • There should be an accompanying "lost in keyboard" list: I was able to add a second L here, but where does my missing colon go?

    May 8, 2014

  • Fine, fine. Now an open list.

    May 8, 2014

  • The "Random word" feature leads me to lots of old science words which no longer seem to be in use (today I got entomostraca). Do you happen to know if there's a list for them somewhere around here?

    May 7, 2014

  • I adore this list!

    May 7, 2014

  • Such a lovely list!

    May 7, 2014

  • Author of Harriet the Spy.

    May 7, 2014

  • Just the list I'd been looking for--thank you!

    May 7, 2014

  • Thank you, bilby.

    May 7, 2014

  • Okay. Is it overARKing or overARCHing? I keep hearing both.

    May 6, 2014

  • Haha! It's true!

    May 2, 2014

  • "PBS science correspondent Miles O'Brien suffered a compartment syndrome and had to have his left arm amputated. According to his blog, O'Brien was securing cases filled with camera gear on a cart as he wrapped up a reporting trip to Japan and the Philippines. One fell on his arm. The arm was sore and swollen the next day but worsened on the next, Feb. 14, 2014, and he sought medical care. At the hospital, as his pain increased and arm numbness set in, a doctor recommended an emergency procedure to relieve the pressure within the limb, O'Brien wrote. The doctor made a real-time call and amputated his arm just above the elbow."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Compartment_syndrome&oldid=605056314

    May 1, 2014

  • See loo.

    May 1, 2014

  • Has someone made a list of those places? I'd add Poughkeepsie.

    May 1, 2014

  • Also see widow-woman.

    April 30, 2014

  • See widow woman.

    April 30, 2014

  • Lovely list!

    April 30, 2014

  • (Also, my new favorite of these is thus.)

    April 30, 2014

  • All your Bafe are belong to us.

    April 30, 2014

  • bootikin?

    April 29, 2014

  • Just saw defenselessness and thought of this list, but it's here already--which didn't surprise me at all!

    April 29, 2014

  • So cothurnus led me to buskin....

    April 29, 2014

  • "A pencil of paraffin or other material which melts at the temperature of the body, with which some medicinal substance has been incorporated: employed for local medication of the urethra, uterus, or other canal into which it is introduced, the melting of the bougie liberating the drug."

    --Century Dictionary

    April 24, 2014

  • "Eoörnis pterovelox gobiensis is a fictional bird, a humorous hoax by Lester W. Sharp, professor of botany, Cornell University, United States.

    It was initially a short talk presented together with a graduate student, Cuthbert Fraser, about the most unusual bird from the Gobi Desert, called woofen-poof by the local populace. (Compare the coinage "woofen-poof" to Whiffenpoof, Hufflepuff, etc.) Eventually it grew into a 34-page monograph signed by an Augustus C. Fotheringham, Sc.D. (Cantab.), F.R.G.S., printed by "The Buighleigh Press" in 1928, full of illustrated detail of anatomy, physiology, ecology, evolution, and historical references, complete with Cro-Magnon cave paintings — all inspired by a car mascot of a pelican. For example, Pterovelox "is perhaps most frequently observed in a peculiar resting position — legs straight out behind with the feet on the rock, tree branch or other object, the body being supported by continuous vibration of wings"."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eoörnis_Pterovelox_Gobiensis

    April 24, 2014

  • Also, mangle. Ooh! And box mangle.

    I love this list.

    April 17, 2014

  • posser

    April 17, 2014

  • You might also like words-of-the-future-part-2, etc.

    April 17, 2014

  • Sorry--those things should come with a warning!

    April 16, 2014

  • "Orangey (credited under various names) had a prolific career in film and television in the 1950s and early 1960's and was the only cat to win two Patsy Awards (Picture Animal Top Star of the Year, an animal actor's version of an Oscar), the first for the title role in Rhubarb (1951), a story about a cat who inherits a fortune, and the second for his portrayal of the cat, Audrey Hepburn's "poor slob without a name" in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Orangey&oldid=594717422

    April 16, 2014

  • The cat called "Cat" in the movie Breakfast at Tiffany's was played by Orangey.

    April 16, 2014

  • Also see Vegetable Lamb of Tartary.

    April 15, 2014

  • I see what you mean about the broken links. This list could support witches too, though--and I think there's even a vampire list around here somewhere (and maybe we can find another spot for the vegetable lamb of tartary).

    April 15, 2014

  • Oh, fun. It's also a "slimy mass of aggregated amoeboid cells from which the sporophore of a cellular slime mold develops" (to quote John Wayne again).

    April 15, 2014

  • Or, you know, beyer beware!

    April 15, 2014

  • See gray water.

    April 15, 2014

  • See stays.

    April 15, 2014

  • Cav-eye-at emptor.

    April 15, 2014

  • Add 'em both, if you like.

    April 15, 2014

  • Also see tepary bean.

    April 15, 2014

  • For more about the etymology, see tepary.

    April 15, 2014

  • Unio pictorum.

    April 15, 2014

  • Also see at latter Lammas.

    April 11, 2014

  • Also see gley.

    April 11, 2014

  • "In heraldry, composed of small squares of two tinctures alternately in one row: said of a bordure, bend, or other ordinary. Also compon, componed, compony, and gobonated. See counter-compony." --from the Century Dictionary

    April 11, 2014

  • Thank you!

    *hands over thank-you fufluns*

    And I suppose I shouldn't stomp my foot and pout... but I miss seeing you here!

    Edit: Lord knows I'm still figuring things out, too. Sigh.

    April 11, 2014

  • Do it!

    April 11, 2014

  • Any chance you could be convinced to make a list with anagrams of names? I want to hear more about Unreal Lauren, Classier Clarisse, and all their friends.

    April 11, 2014

  • I always like your lists!

    April 10, 2014

  • Your anagrams are great!

    April 10, 2014

  • "The Legend of the Octopus is a sports tradition during Detroit Red Wings home playoff games where octopuses are thrown onto the ice surface. The origins of the activity go back to the 1952 playoffs, when a National Hockey League team played two best-of-seven series to capture the Stanley Cup. The octopus, having eight arms, symbolized the number of playoff wins necessary for the Red Wings to win the Stanley Cup. The practice started April 15, 1952 when Pete and Jerry Cusimano, brothers and storeowners in Detroit's Eastern Market, hurled an octopus into the rink of The Old Red Barn. The team swept the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Canadiens en route to winning the championship, as well as winning two of the next three championships.

    Since 1952 the practice has persisted with each passing year. In one 1995 game, fans threw 36 octopuses, including a specimen weighing 38 pounds (17 kg). The Red Wings' unofficial mascot is a purple octopus named Al, and during playoff runs two of these mascots are also hung from the rafters of the Joe Louis Arena, symbolizing the 16 wins now needed to win the Stanley Cup. It has become such an accepted part of the team's lore, that fans have developed what is considered proper etiquette and technique for throwing an octopus onto the ice."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Legend_of_the_Octopus&oldid=588684795

    April 10, 2014

  • Oh, I have more. Would you like one with grape riffles?

    April 10, 2014

  • Ha! I know.

    April 10, 2014

  • Okay--I made a zombification list.

    April 9, 2014

  • Such a nice list. Thank you.

    April 9, 2014

  • Your lists continue to fascinate me. Thank you.

    April 9, 2014

  • I'm sure that if you toggle the switch back to normal light, the list title will line up on the left again.

    April 9, 2014

  • That's true. It's a shame to waste good martinis on creepy dictionaries.

    April 9, 2014

  • Any chance you could be convinced to add brackets to "epileptic lagomorph driving" over on moro reflex? I have just the list for it.

    April 9, 2014

  • I'm adding this to my rabbit list.

    April 9, 2014

  • *sets down fuflun*
    *backs away slowly*
    *waits*

    April 9, 2014

  • Check out the word page for adeptitude--the user ry added your comment there. (You might have to scroll down a bit, but now your citation is there for you and anyone else to see.)

    April 9, 2014

  • Two more things. First, I think Buckaroo Banzai had a group called The Blue Blaze Irregulars. Second, I just ran across that poem by Anne Sexton called "Lessons in Hunger" where the first three lines are as follows:
    "'Do you like me?'
    I asked the blue blazer.
    No answer."

    April 8, 2014

  • "Suburban women?"

    April 8, 2014

  • I have just the list for it!

    April 8, 2014

  • My understanding of that prank in the video is that it was from a university-level class (I'd say "college-level" class, but that could confuse matters even more).

    I can think of times when "professor" is used as a form of antonomasia. For instance, there's a scene in "The Philadelphia Story" where Katherine Hepburn's character keeps calling Jimmy Stewart's character "professor," even though he's just a reporter. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQC2guz8oGc)

    April 8, 2014

  • See Oolong.

    April 8, 2014

  • Oolong was "a domestic rabbit owned by Hironori Akutagawa. Oolong became an Internet phenomenon through his owner, Akutagawa, uploading images of the rabbit with objects balanced on his head." From http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Oolong_(rabbit)&oldid=599235489

    April 8, 2014

  • *throws drink in wiktionary's face and storms out*

    April 8, 2014

  • There are a few drink lists, and a few wine lists, but you should make one up for us, alexz--it's always more fun to create your own (based on your own tastes).

    April 7, 2014

  • Uh, "aimed at women?"

    April 7, 2014

  • Ōkunoshima: Takehara, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. "It is often called Usagi Jima" or "Rabbit Island" because of "the numerous feral rabbits that roam the island."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ōkunoshima&oldid=597878278

    April 4, 2014

  • See Rabbit Island.

    April 4, 2014

  • I find that to be in potaste--I love it!

    April 4, 2014

  • Wonderinging is probably just a banananaphone--wouldn't a bahahahanaphone be wonderinginging?

    April 4, 2014

  • Ceci n'est pas la lettre a.

    April 4, 2014

  • Ha--and here I was, wonderinging only whether it had something to do with tattoos or wattles.

    Edit: And now I'm left wondering what "wonderinging" means.

    April 4, 2014

  • There were a couple entries on the vogon-poetry list that might work... "utty gabbleblotchits" yields "bilby got chub tattles" (whatever that means).

    April 3, 2014

  • I just saw the word coulterneb over on puffin.

    April 3, 2014

  • "A flea-beetle; a saltatorial beetle of the genus Haltica, as H. nemorum, which injures the turnip, and is also called turnip-flea and turnip-fly." -- from the Century

    April 3, 2014

  • Also see flea.

    April 3, 2014

  • Also see flea, turnip-flea.

    April 3, 2014

  • puffin

    April 3, 2014

  • These are so great! What a lovely list.

    April 3, 2014

  • See recamier.

    April 3, 2014

  • I rather like it.

    April 3, 2014

  • Your comments amuse me, ry, but I have to be quick to catch them--wasn't this a mountain a minute ago?

    April 2, 2014

  • I like this list.

    April 2, 2014

  • "In mathematics, vanishing on being raised to a certain power. Thus, if i be such an expression in multiple algebra that i × i × i = 0, i is nilpotent." -- Century

    April 2, 2014

  • Nice list! I took the liberty of adding displease, dissatisfy, mismanage, neglect, and bumble as separate entries.

    April 2, 2014

  • "Footwraps (also referred to as foot cloths, rags, bandages or bindings, or by their Russian name portyanki) are rectangular pieces of cloth that are worn wrapped around the feet to avoid chafing, absorb sweat and improve the foothold. Footwraps were worn with boots before socks became widely available, and remained in use by armies in Eastern Europe up until the beginning of the 21st century."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Footwraps&oldid=600288869

    April 2, 2014

  • (And socks.)

    April 2, 2014

  • So babul is interesting, but it might be the name of the tree (not its gum).

    Also, could meska work for gum arabic?

    April 2, 2014

  • "An old name of the chub. Also chiven, chiving." -- Century

    April 2, 2014

  • I'm surprised this hasn't been listed yet.

    April 2, 2014

  • "A kind of opal bead of the size of a marble." -- from the Century

    April 2, 2014

  • I've put pants back on. I also added a skirt.

    April 2, 2014

  • Also, still adoring bilby. (See the-janus-file.)

    April 1, 2014

  • I was thinking of panting, then pantsing, then thought better of having added it and tried to delete it, then couldn't... and now you can see why I don't want to add the crusty evil clown pants.

    I think they're looking at me.

    *backs away slowly*

    April 1, 2014

  • I'm nearly certain that crusty evil clown pants have agency, but I'm scared to add them.

    April 1, 2014

  • Ha! Not only did I just eat half a bag of Skittles, but earlier today I heard a joke about unicorn meat in a can. ("Would you try it? Neigh.")

    April 1, 2014

  • Thanks treeeees, bliby, and hotmadum (okra is unanagramable, but okra list becomes solar kit, oral skit or risk a lot, &c.).

    April 1, 2014

  • See louping-ill.

    March 31, 2014

  • Joy! Rupture! What a great list.

    March 31, 2014

  • Here's my list of bad-luck things. (Just this morning I had a close call--I almost put on a scarf with the colors red, green, and purple together. Scary.)

    March 28, 2014

  • See Dikerogammarus villosus.

    March 28, 2014

  • Wait... now *this* is my new favorite list.

    March 27, 2014

  • This is my new favorite list.

    March 27, 2014

  • List-worthy, but I'm unable to deal with the required apostrophes.

    March 27, 2014

  • See ladies' fingers.

    March 27, 2014

  • Is it lady fingers or ladies' fingers?

    March 27, 2014

  • You're fun, and I'm glad you're here.

    March 27, 2014

  • Also, I just made a list about okra. *hangs head in shame*

    March 27, 2014

  • See bilby's comment on the-janus-file.

    March 27, 2014

  • This one's not even interesting, but I'll confess it all the same: Sometimes I'll add the name of the list as an entry *to* the list so that it's easier for me to search for it later. And sometimes I forget about capitalization, so I'll add different variations. See as-in-the-cut.

    March 27, 2014

  • Sometimes I'll add the name of the list as an entry *to* the list so that it's easier for me to search for it later. And sometimes I forget about capitalization, so I'll add different variations.

    I think there's a list somewhere for these sorts of confessions.

    March 27, 2014

  • I still adore you.

    March 27, 2014

  • Ha! Brackets around "okrish," please.

    March 26, 2014

  • Wonderful!

    March 26, 2014

  • yummmm

    March 26, 2014

  • Okra is much better when it's breaded and fried. Or pickled, I suppose.

    March 26, 2014

  • I think the scariest one is mobil gas vans (see http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_van&oldid=599212552).

    March 26, 2014

  • *swoons*

    March 26, 2014

  • "An exclamation of applause or joy; a viva."
    -- from the Century

    March 26, 2014

  • Not a heavy anti-gas suit?

    March 26, 2014

  • "A drawing; picture; portrait; hence, countenance; aspect."
    -- from the Century

    March 26, 2014

  • Muesli!

    March 26, 2014

  • I was just reading about Augustus Egg.

    March 26, 2014

  • This is so brilliant and scary.

    March 26, 2014

  • "unpunctuated was added by uselessness and appears on just this list."

    March 26, 2014

  • Oh! This is fun.

    March 26, 2014

  • Fascinating.

    March 26, 2014

  • See, e.g., Tyrrhenian.

    March 26, 2014

  • Thornton Wilder's theophilus-north has a part about Mozart and a part about wind and buildings and Vitruvius.

    March 26, 2014

  • This is so lovely!

    March 26, 2014

  • Donate whatever you like!

    March 26, 2014

  • Thanks! Added.

    March 26, 2014

  • Exactly. I'm thinking there's an untapped market for muco-autophages and muco-cannibals wanting to try vegetarian options: soy-boogers, for example. Okra might work, too.

    March 26, 2014

  • (And brackets around "snotting," please.)

    March 26, 2014

  • Madmouth's spectrum intrigues me. "Ovo-lacto" vegetarians eat milk and eggs, but not flesh. Do we need an equivalent distinction for cannibals and autophages?

    March 26, 2014

  • Excellent list!

    March 26, 2014

  • This is perfectly grotesque, and I thank you all very kindly.
    *wanders off to make a-snotty-list*

    March 26, 2014

  • Ah. It's 14 ways for the blackshirts (it's by Umberto Eco).

    March 26, 2014

  • madmouth: Pound? I'd make a joke about all editors being fascists, but it's not true--so it wouldn't be funny, and then what's the point? But... also... you'd said something about the Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird, which reminds me that I once read something about Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackshirt.

    yarb: Didn't he write some of those cantos when he was in a cage or in a cell or something?

    and ry: I was thinking some of the same things about religion over on your lies--1 list.

    March 26, 2014

  • Ew!

    March 26, 2014

  • That should be on a T-shirt.

    March 26, 2014

  • Oh, man. Okay. Kerchief again. Also Galen again (I just made a galen list!), and confectio Damocritis, obviously, again.

    March 25, 2014

  • I love you, Pro.

    March 25, 2014

  • Nota bene: initialism.

    March 25, 2014

  • I've been wanting to know more about The Lost Generation--I checked out a biography of Sylvia Beach and thought maybe it was time to read Ulysses, but I haven't gotten very far yet. I *have* read a little Eliot (all thanks to bilby's comments about the hyacinth girl), but Pound has always scared me.

    March 25, 2014

  • I was starting in on A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers last weekend, but I got hung up before I could get through the acknowledgment section. I love creative nonfiction, but there's this part where he says that "if you are bothered by the idea of this being real, you are invited to do what the author should have done, and what authors and readers have been doing since the beginning of time: PRETEND IT'S FICTION." I'm not sure I agree that readers have always done this. Memory is tricky enough as it is. (I always love it when people say things like "It was back in 1998. No! I lied. It was 1999." Is that really lying?)

    And I'm not sure what liking Miro and thinking of Klee means. But I could be lying.

    March 25, 2014

  • I've had Gargantua and Pantagruel on my list forever--though lately I've been distracted by the Joyce/Pound/Eliot triumvirate and some of their detractors. Which Pound are you reading?

    March 25, 2014

  • If the glove fits....

    March 25, 2014

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