Comments by ruzuzu

  • Pronounced like foaling, no doubt.

    August 31, 2015

  • Ha!

    August 31, 2015

  • I added Grover's Mill because of The War of the Worlds broadcast from 1938.

    Okay. Actually, that's a lie. I added it because of Buckaroo Bonzai.

    August 31, 2015

  • I love this one from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia: "n. A kind of writing used in the text or body of clerkly manuscripts; formal handwriting; now, especially, a writing or type of a form peculiar to some class of old manuscripts; specifically, in heraldry, Old English black-letter: as, German or English text; a text (black-letter) R or T."

    August 28, 2015

  • I had never looked up the etymology for this before--I might have guessed something to do with text, but not weaving.

    August 28, 2015

  • Nice!

    August 28, 2015

  • I just saw it as I was paging through my Webster's New World Dictionary (College Edition). I also found Bifrost and biffin.

    August 28, 2015

  • I'm surprised this hasn't been listed yet.

    August 28, 2015

  • Czy znasz historię wielkiego złego wilka i trzech spamerów?

    August 27, 2015

  • This part reminds me of junior high math class: "A good criteria summoned Double Elliptic Curve, cultivated in the charity, was there while travelling in order to appreciation from the Native Company connected with Paradigm also Knowledge united associated with a number of good enough means in favor of cranking out accidental amounts."

    August 24, 2015

  • And I like gówno. Here's what my dictionary has to say: "gown~iarz: mp wulg. 1. young shitass. 2. Br. nightman. ~o* -wien shit."

    August 24, 2015

  • Ach, co za piękny kawałek kału!

    I actually bought a Polish/English dictionary to try to figure some of this stuff out--if they're going to spam us, I might as well have some fun and learn something new, right?

    For instance, as I was looking up the translation for feces, I discovered the word excrementitious. Isn't that divine?

    August 24, 2015

  • Powiedz mi więcej o Polsce. Co możesz zobaczyć? Las? Morze? Spam? Chleb żytni? Buraki?

    Ach. Teraz jestem głodny.

    August 24, 2015

  • I love this list.

    August 18, 2015

  • Tworzyw sztucznych do pakowania spam? To sprawia, że chcę śpiewać. Co to za piosenka o sokołami?

    Hej, hej, hej sokoły
    Omijajcie góry, lasy, doły.
    Dzwoń, dzwoń, dzwoń dzwoneczku,
    Mój stepowy skowroneczku.

    Hej, hej, hej sokoły
    Omijajcie góry, lasy, doły.
    Dzwoń, dzwoń, dzwoń dzwoneczku,
    Mój stepowy
    Dzwoń, dzwoń, dzwoń



    August 18, 2015

  • Dziękuję, QMS!

    August 18, 2015

  • Thanks! You've just given me an epiphany about Leonard Cohen's Famous Blue Raincoat song:

    Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
    She said that you gave it to her
    That night that you planned to go clear
    Did you ever go clear?

    August 18, 2015

  • Witam, Próbuję nauczyć się mówić po polsku. Czy możesz nam powiedzieć coś więcej na temat innych produktów mięsnych, oprócz spam? Jestem szczególnie zainteresowany priapitc elfy, które pływają w kadziach z fasoli.

    August 17, 2015

  • I love this one from the Century: "n. The extraction of roots from powers: the reverse of involution (which see)."

    August 17, 2015

  • See evolution.

    August 17, 2015

  • To get to the other pride.

    August 15, 2015

  • To get to the other guide.

    August 15, 2015

  • To get to the other slide.

    August 15, 2015

  • I didn't know there was a word for these. Thanks!

    August 14, 2015

  • Wait. Why did the bilby cross the road?

    August 14, 2015

  • It's also a Pantone color (7457 is a sort of robin's egg blue).

    August 13, 2015

  • Haha! I just got flagged as spam for trying to add something over on 7457.

    August 13, 2015

  • Also, chwas.

    August 13, 2015

  • I didn't see anything in my compact version of the OED (though, granted, it's hard to see anything in there without a magnifying glass). I did find chwine and chwot, though--so that was fun.

    August 13, 2015

  • I like your comment on perfluorooctanoic acid.

    August 13, 2015

  • See citation on abbey-lubber.

    August 13, 2015

  • How interesting! Have you seen Lubber? http://www.nebraskahistory.org/sites/mnh/weird_nebraska/have_you_seen.htm

    August 13, 2015

  • I think Yeats would agree that it's "a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi." (See http://www.potw.org/archive/potw351.html.)

    August 12, 2015

  • I'm still adding it to my list.

    August 12, 2015

  • Thanks, VM! You'll never be spam to me. <3

    August 11, 2015

  • Fabulous! Thanks, slumry.

    August 11, 2015

  • Why loop?

    August 11, 2015

  • I should have known murder hole would be here already. Thanks, chained_bear.

    August 11, 2015

  • Also see machicolation.

    August 11, 2015

  • Thank you, slumry!

    August 11, 2015

  • Add it, if you like--this list is as open as the wide Nebraska prairie.

    August 11, 2015

  • "There are many uncertainties about the time of colonisation, the phylogenetic relationships and the taxonomic status of dwarf elephants on the Mediterranean islands. Extinction of the insular dwarf elephants has not been correlated with the arrival in the islands of man. Furthermore, it has been suggested by the palaeontologist Othenio Abel in 1914, that the finding of skeletons of such elephants sparked the idea that they belonged to giant cyclopses, because the center nasal opening was thought to be a cyclopic eye socket."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwarf_elephant

    August 10, 2015

  • A friend of mine was telling about a recipe for jumbo mini-muffins, so I had to tell him about the dwarf mammoth skeleton I'd just seen at my local natural history museum.

    Then, of course, I had to tell you!

    August 10, 2015

  • I'll note that "I heart Wordnik" is "a third wonkier."

    August 10, 2015

  • Or "I <3 Wordnik."

    August 10, 2015

  • We should figure out some for wordienik.

    August 10, 2015

  • I didn't realize this was a word! I'd think of this as, say, an acreage.

    August 10, 2015

  • See comments on ranchette.

    August 10, 2015

  • Awesome. You might find some yoinkworthy words over on https://www.wordnik.com/lists/the-shortening-of-the-way

    August 10, 2015

  • This is great!

    August 10, 2015

  • Thanks, slumry. That makes sense.

    August 10, 2015

  • In my dream, this was the name of the system for writing down dressage choreography.

    August 9, 2015

  • Virtual aircraft museum: http://www.aviastar.org/index2.html

    August 4, 2015

  • Max!

    August 4, 2015

  • Oh! Just like the buttered-cat array!

    August 3, 2015

  • Yay! I love this list.

    August 3, 2015

  • And double umbrage for not making a cellar list for our amusement.

    August 3, 2015

  • Fun!

    August 3, 2015

  • Umbrage! You didn't put brackets around jagron.

    August 3, 2015

  • See down cellar.

    August 3, 2015

  • See down cellar.

    August 3, 2015

  • *press*

    August 3, 2015

  • Oh, look! A delicious food pellet!

    August 3, 2015

  • Bilbybagginses, there is a typo in your comment about the technical foul--obviously disqualifying said comment. And a non-accent is, by its very nature, not an accent. (Once nebraksans conquer the airwaves, we'll use that platform to convince the rest of the world of this.) And furthermore, if the vending machine choses not to give you any tasty pellets, why not try putting some brackets around something in your own comments? (I find food pellet to be a yummy alternative.)

    August 3, 2015

  • Okay, okay. I'll admit it--cellar door *is* beautiful.

    <3

    August 1, 2015

  • John!

    August 1, 2015

  • Oh! And I take umbrage at the apparent lack of a cellar list--surely we'd like a nice spot for root cellar and storm cellar and that silly business about cellar door--right? I nominate bilbykins to make one for us. Just because.

    August 1, 2015

  • Gosh--it's been ages since we had a hilarious misunderstanding around here. Shall we commence with the phony umbrage taking? I'll start. First, as a nebraksan, I take umbrage at the notion that accents are somehow hip or cool. Why, around these parts, we pride ourselves on the notion that we make the most versatile newscasters because we have no accents. Ha! Second, I take umbrage at the notion that VM's humor is somehow impaired. Watch as I balance on this unicycle and toss fufluns toward the vendingmachine. Does it not spit quarters back at me? (Or those dreaded dollar coins that are impossible to feed into the coin slot on the city bus?) And last, but not least, I take umbrage at what I anticipate to be bilby's next comment--something along the lines of "take my wives... please." Sir, I take umbrage; not wives.

    August 1, 2015

  • "A step; a rough measure of length employed by the Greeks and Macedonians when stadia were paced off, and not merely estimated by shouting."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    July 30, 2015

  • From the Century:

    "n. A place into which dirty water, etc., is thrown; a sink. Also jaw-box, jaw-foot.
    n. An opening in the ground; the entrance to a cave or cavern."

    July 30, 2015

  • "n. A casting secured to the frame of a truck and forming a jaw for holding a journal box."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    July 30, 2015

  • "A tub boat was a type of unpowered cargo boat used on a number of the early English and German canals. The English boats were typically 6 m (19.7 ft) long and 2 m (6.6 ft) wide and generally carried 3 long tons (3.0 t; 3.4 short tons) to 5 long tons (5.1 t; 5.6 short tons) of cargo, though some extra deep ones could carry up to 8 long tons (8.1 t; 9.0 short tons). They are also called compartment boats or container boats."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tub_boat

    July 30, 2015

  • Thanks, VM! I especially like the dolly tub.
    And I'm a sucker for variations--it's fun to see how things change over time.

    July 30, 2015

  • See raspberrying.

    July 29, 2015

  • I'm confused.

    July 29, 2015

  • See knittle.

    July 29, 2015

  • Hilarious. Thanks TH and VM.

    July 29, 2015

  • Thanks, vm. I love you, too!

    July 29, 2015

  • How did I miss this list? It's fabulous!

    July 29, 2015

  • *trips silent alarm*

    July 29, 2015

  • See Qiana.
    See, also, the part of slumry's brain where totally tubular is stored.

    July 29, 2015

  • I still like to use clotheslines--even in the winter (we'd always call it "freeze drying").

    And alexz, you just made me laugh out loud. Hot Tub Time Machine is perfect (for this list).

    July 29, 2015

  • I've just made a list of tubs. Have at!

    July 29, 2015

  • Those Wiktionary definitions are interesting.

    July 29, 2015

  • Thanks, vendingmachine. I've added it to my disturbing-definitions-from-the-century-dictionary. As much as I love the Century (and we all know I do), there are times when it troubles me.

    July 29, 2015

  • I was tempted to make a tub-y list last week. Has someone else already made one?

    July 29, 2015

  • This is one of my favorites: https://www.wordnik.com/lists/the-worshipful-company-of-haberdashers

    July 29, 2015

  • How is this not listed yet?

    July 27, 2015

  • Ah! Thank you! That had something about a panel game....

    *wanders off, mumbling something about the search for confectio Damocritis*

    July 27, 2015

  • Fascinating! What's your source, VM? Is this related to Mickey Finn?

    July 27, 2015

  • Love it!

    July 24, 2015

  • Ooh! That's a good one for my turnips list.

    July 24, 2015

  • It would be fun to know which quotation the Century had here, but sometimes mysteries are more entertaining: "n. In the following quotation the word is used punningly, with reference to the freezing over of the Thames during the winter of 1607-8."

    July 24, 2015

  • "Pear-shaped; having the general shape of a pear; obconic; differing from egg-shaped or oviform in having a slight constriction running around it, or, in section, a reverse or concave curve between the convex curves of the two ends: as, a pyriform vase. See cut of egg under plover."

    Oh, Century, I love you so.

    July 23, 2015

  • Sorry. I was thinking of John Locke.

    July 23, 2015

  • The Rye House Plot?

    July 23, 2015

  • I like your lists.

    July 23, 2015

  • Have at! (You might have seen that I've already added unicorn.)

    July 23, 2015

  • Wedge Schwa would be a great name for a band.

    July 22, 2015

  • Lovely list!

    July 22, 2015

  • "To utter inarticulate sounds in rapid succession, like a goose when feeding."
    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    July 22, 2015

  • See comments on glitched-definitions.

    July 22, 2015

  • I dig it.

    July 21, 2015

  • I love this list.

    July 21, 2015

  • And bluing.

    July 21, 2015

  • From the Century: "To make dark-colored; specifically, in dyeing and calico-printing, to tone down or shade (the colors employed) by the application of certain agents, as salts of iron, copper, or bichromate of potash."

    See stuffing.

    July 21, 2015

  • The Century has "n. Pomolobus chrysochloris, of the family Clupeidæ, a herring found land-locked in the Ohio and Mississippi rivers," but I think it's now known as Alosa chrysochloris.

    July 21, 2015

  • Ha!

    July 21, 2015

  • Congratulations! You might see some fun stuff on myriad.

    July 20, 2015

  • Add it, if you like. (This is why I love open lists so much.)

    July 17, 2015

  • Thank you, slumry.

    July 16, 2015

  • It's hard to tell why it's not a valid Scrabble word. Maybe it wasn't in enough of the source dictionaries.

    As for dyssynchronicity, I'm certain it will never be playable--but that's because it has 16 letters (and there's only room on the board for 15-letter words). :)

    July 16, 2015

  • I nominate you to make one for us, slumry (if you like).

    July 16, 2015

  • I'd hate to be seen as impertinent. Here's a perty list for our amusement.

    July 16, 2015

  • Fun!

    July 16, 2015

  • Do we have a -pert list somewhere?

    July 16, 2015

  • "A finite pattern that moves like a spaceship but leaves a trail of debris."

    -- Wiktionary

    July 16, 2015

  • The merry color produced by woad and weld.

    July 16, 2015

  • See weld (or dyer's rocket).

    July 16, 2015

  • Ha! Of *course* he does.

    July 16, 2015

  • It all makes sense now.

    July 16, 2015

  • Feel free to plunder the-whole-ball-of-wax.

    July 16, 2015

  • The "term used for witches in Benevento, janara, arguably could be derived from the name of Diana."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witches_of_Benevento

    July 16, 2015

  • ""They were very aggressive, very lairy, looking for trouble, and they got it really," (Robin) Lee told BuzzFeed News. "There was a PCSO and about four police officers, actually about seven of them on the platform, and a couple of them were being lairy and were wanting to antagonise me.""

    -- http://www.buzzfeed.com/patricksmith/artist-arrested-for-charging-his-phone-on-the-london-overgro

    July 13, 2015

  • Huh. I just got propago as a random word.

    July 13, 2015

  • These are great, hernesheir! I arrived here after getting meat-safe as a random word.

    July 13, 2015

  • I like your lists.

    July 13, 2015

  • I like this one from the Century: "A coarse sweetmeat, professedly made from the root of the plant, but really composed of little else than colored sugar."

    July 13, 2015

  • I arrived here after getting a clew.

    July 12, 2015

  • Thanks, vendingmachine!

    July 10, 2015

  • This rock paper business worries me--will scissors finally emerge unbeaten in every game of rock, paper, scissors?

    July 10, 2015

  • Cf. ratite.

    July 9, 2015

  • "A somewhat rare congenital condition of the sternum is a sternal foramen, a single round hole in the breastbone that is present from birth and usually is off-centered to the right or left, commonly forming in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th segments of the breastbone body. Congenital sternal foramens can often be mistaken for bullet holes."
    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sternum

    July 9, 2015

  • "Fractures of the breastbone are rather uncommon. They may result from trauma, such as when a driver's chest is forced into the steering column of a car in a car accident. A fracture of the sternum is usually a comminuted fracture."
    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sternum

    July 9, 2015

  • Thanks, alexz. I'd often wondered about that.

    July 9, 2015

  • Unantilanguaging?

    July 8, 2015

  • Undelanguaging?

    July 8, 2015

  • Let's see... reposting a previously deleted comment. Reantiantelanguaging?

    July 8, 2015

  • Fabulous!

    July 8, 2015

  • I really like your lists, kalayzich. Thank you!

    July 8, 2015

  • Is speechlessness the same as antidelanguaging?

    July 8, 2015

  • The list, I mean.

    July 8, 2015

  • Oh! I got it to work just now--but I copied "tree-free-paper-alternatives" from the URL at the top.

    July 8, 2015

  • Weird. Is it because tree-free-paper-alternatives already contains a hyphen?

    July 8, 2015

  • Yes! And I'm imagining the Aussie equivalent would be hillbilby speed bumps.

    July 8, 2015

  • Thank you, vendingmachine. That is the dream of every jokester who has laughed about "recycled toilet paper."

    July 8, 2015

  • It's getting bigger and bigger every day.

    July 8, 2015

  • That's great, ry. I like the bit about weeds, too.

    July 7, 2015

  • No, no. I insist.

    July 7, 2015

  • :)

    July 6, 2015

  • One more thing, then I'll stop. (I swear!) Scalia has collaborated with lexicographer Bryan Garner: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/books/2012/08/reading_law_antonin_scalia_and_bryan_garner_s_guide_to_textualism_reviewed_.html

    July 6, 2015

  • And there's this thing about using dictionary definitions in opinions. (See "LOOKING IT UP: The Supreme Court's Use of Dictionaries in Statutory and Constitutional Interpretation" By Kevin Werbach http://werbach.com/stuff/hlr_note.html)

    July 6, 2015

  • Ha! Haha. Thank you, slumry.

    July 6, 2015

  • Gosh, I'm glad to have the Visuals back.

    July 6, 2015

  • It would be fun to have a list about advertising (ad, advert, advertise...), but I wonder whether it'd get all spammy. Do we have one already?

    July 6, 2015

  • That is so cool!

    July 6, 2015

  • Beans, beans. Or a musical flute.
    The more you eat, the more you toot?

    July 6, 2015

  • Not Centaurea cyanus (the "common cornflower"), and not Cichorium endivia (curly endive), though "chicory" has been used to refer to either.

    July 6, 2015

  • love

    July 6, 2015

  • A round of fufluns, on me!

    July 2, 2015

  • Ach! How did I miss this list? I love it!

    July 2, 2015

  • This is such a great list!

    July 2, 2015

  • I adore this list.

    July 2, 2015

  • Also, see papaver.

    July 1, 2015

  • Is it anything like jump the shark?

    July 1, 2015

  • See bully.

    July 1, 2015

  • Such an interesting word: mining, beef, football, pimps.

    July 1, 2015

  • Brackets around "bilky," please.

    June 25, 2015

  • Oh! Never mind. I see that the word plinth has already been adopted by reesetee. Thanks, reesetee.

    June 23, 2015

  • And maybe don't mention it to TankHughes over on plosives-from-front-to-back.

    June 23, 2015

  • Uh, anyone need a plinth? Free to good home (you provide transportation).

    June 23, 2015

  • Oh. That would be weird, wouldn't it? A birthday plinth. Ha. Who'd think that was a good idea?

    Um. Excuse me. I'll be right back.

    June 23, 2015

  • *favorited*

    Also, how do you feel about the word plinth?

    June 23, 2015

  • I love everything you post, and I feel the same way about myself--all the time. More! Post more!

    June 23, 2015

  • Found myself here after looking up the word sough.

    June 22, 2015

  • I prefer death by chocolate.

    June 22, 2015

  • Fine, fine. I guess I just nominated myself, didn't I?

    June 22, 2015

  • I was going to yoink this for my cattle list, but I see that it's already there. Now I'm wondering whether there are any bison or buffalo lists anywhere--excuse me while I roam off to where the deer and the antelope play.

    June 22, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • I think this is a great place for comments and feedback, erlome. I'll note two things. First, our benevolent Wordnik overlords only track the number of words we've looked at when we're actively logged in to the site--and we can each change our own settings to decide how much of that information we'd like the rest of the world to see. Second, the venerable Century definitions are still here--but only for those words that are old enough to have been around before the dawn of lolcats and yolo. (My favorite Century definitions tend to have the word hence in them--I even made a hence list.)

    Anywho, I'm glad you're here!

    June 18, 2015

  • "Blaschko's lines, also called the Lines of Blaschko, named after Alfred Blaschko, are lines of normal cell development in the skin. These lines are invisible under normal conditions. They become apparent when some diseases of the skin or mucosa manifest themselves according to these patterns."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaschko's_lines

    June 17, 2015

  • Fabulous! Thank you.

    June 16, 2015

  • I adore this list.

    June 11, 2015

  • I'll make a comment about this later.

    June 11, 2015

  • See res ipsa loquitur.

    June 11, 2015

  • Unfunfufluns, then?

    June 11, 2015

  • Anyone care for some fufluns?

    June 11, 2015

  • A mi me gusta mucho.

    June 11, 2015

  • The Latvians I know say something more like "BIT-eh." So, yes--it's more like "bitter" than it is like something which could produce honey.

    June 11, 2015

  • In Latvian, bite means bee.

    June 10, 2015

  • Or maybe a false cognate?

    June 10, 2015

  • I know. I was trying to remember that, too. Is it just a false friend?

    June 10, 2015

  • I like your lists.

    June 10, 2015

  • Those etymologies are fun.

    June 10, 2015

  • I just got comate as a random word--I had no idea coma can also mean hairy.

    June 10, 2015

  • "Although nutraloaf can be found in many United States prisons, its use is controversial. It was mentioned by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1978 in Hutto v. Finney while ruling that conditions in the Arkansas penal system constituted cruel and unusual punishment. Prisoners were fed "grue", described as "a substance created by mashing meat, potatoes, margarine, syrup, vegetables, eggs, and seasoning into a paste and baking the mixture in a pan." The majority decision delivered by Justice Stevens upheld an order from the 8th Circuit Court that the grue diet be discontinued."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nutraloaf&oldid=658869419

    June 10, 2015

  • Love this--it'll never get boring. Ha. Hahaha.

    June 9, 2015

  • Ha!

    June 9, 2015

  • "A frame-saw with a narrow blade, used to cut curved kerfs. See cut under saw."

    -- from the Century Dictionary

    June 8, 2015

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