Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A bright blue, as of a clear sky.
  • noun Heraldry The color blue.
  • noun The blue sky.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To color blue.
  • noun Lapis lazuli.
  • noun The fine blue color of the sky: as, “her eyes a bashful azure,”
  • noun A name formerly applied to several sky-colored or blue pigments, but now used for cobalt blue (which see, under blue).
  • noun The sky, or blue vault of heaven.
  • noun In heraldry, the tincture blue, which in uncolored drawings or engravings is represented by shading in horizontal lines. Often abbreviated to az.
  • Resembling the clear blue color of the sky; sky-blue.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Sky-blue; resembling the clear blue color of the unclouded sky; cerulean; also, cloudless.
  • adjective (Min.) the lapis lazuli; also, the lazulite.
  • transitive verb To color blue.
  • noun obsolete The lapis lazuli.
  • noun The clear blue color of the sky; also, a pigment or dye of this color.
  • noun The blue vault above; the unclouded sky.
  • noun (Her.) A blue color, represented in engraving by horizontal parallel lines.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun heraldry A blue colour on a coat of arms, represented in engraving by horizontal parallel lines.
  • noun The clear blue colour of the sky; also, a pigment or dye of this colour.
  • noun poetic The unclouded sky; the blue vault above.
  • noun Lapis lazuli.
  • adjective Sky-blue; resembling the clear blue colour of the unclouded sky; cerulean; also, cloudless.
  • adjective heraldry In blazon, of the colour blue.
  • verb transitive To colour blue.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a light shade of blue
  • adjective of a deep somewhat purplish blue color similar to that of a clear October sky
  • verb color azure

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French azur, from Medieval Latin azura, from Arabic al-lāzaward, the azure : al-, the + lāzaward, azure (from Persian lāzhuward, lapis lazuli).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French azur, derived from Arabic لازوَرْد (lāzaward, "lapis lazuli"), dropping the l as if it were equivalent to the French article l'. The Arabic is from Persian لاجورد (lajward, "azure"), from the region of Lajward in Turkestan.

Examples

  • So he stood waist-deep in the grass and looked regretfully across the rolling savannah and the soft-swelling foothills to the Lion's Head, a massive peak of rock that upreared into the azure from the midmost centre of Guadalcanar, a landmark used for bearings by every coasting mariner, a mountain as yet untrod by the foot of a white man.

    Chapter 23

  • This was particularly hard to do since, just before we went on the air, ABC had shown a series of exchanges between police and demonstrators which made it quite clear that the boys in azure blue were on a great lark. beating up everyone in sight.

    r_urell: William F. Buckley: Father of Modern "Conservatism"

  • It is the Accidentally On-Purpose Drop-Stitch Vest from the book Stitch 'n Bitch Nation, in azure, a cheerful and summery shade of blue.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • The impression of an unending azure is broken only by the appearance of five yellow flowers: one painted on each hand, one on her forehead, one on her upper chest and one on her stomach.

    The Art Of Peace

  • The impression of an unending azure is broken only by the appearance of five yellow flowers: one painted on each hand, one on her forehead, one on her upper chest and one on her stomach.

    The Art Of Peace

  • To use Browning's words, Scott "fished the murex up," so that Carlyle outdid Macaulay in "azure feats."

    History and Literature

  • So he stood waist-deep in the grass and looked regretfully across the rolling savannah and the soft-swelling foothills to the Lion's Head, a massive peak of rock that upreared into the azure from the midmost centre of

    A Message From the Bush

  • To have to care for my dress at this time of day more than I ever did when young and pretty and happy (God bless me, to think that I was once all that!) on penalty of being regarded as a blot on the Grange gold and azure, is really too bad.

    Letters and Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle

  • Next is the obligatory blue space which I guess I would describe as azure a place called Danube would have.

    Augieland

  • Next is the obligatory blue space which I guess I would describe as azure a place called Danube would have.

    Danube, 623 ceruleanillian stars

Comments

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  • One of the most pretentious words ever - an adjective which communicates more about its deployer than its subject. A deplorable word which must be eschewed by all writers (for have you ever heard it used in conversation?) of imagination and / or panache.

    November 30, 2007

  • How do you feel about cerulean, yarb?

    November 30, 2007

  • I don't really like cerulean, but for some reason it doesn't make my piss boil like 'azure'.

    November 30, 2007

  • What do you think of Milton? ('...uneasy steps/Over the burning marle, not like those steps/On Heaven’s azure...')

    November 30, 2007

  • I think Milton is chiefly responsible for the popularity among poetasters of this rephrensible word.

    December 1, 2007

  • ...Not seeing what's so bad about it.

    October 7, 2008

  • So you're not a big fan of the actress Azura Skye, then?

    October 7, 2008

  • I liked it because of that episode of X-Files, where the guy who could take over your mind by talking to you tried to convince mulder he was about to be run over by a semi-truck that was azure colored

    December 31, 2008

  • That's so creepy. This is the only X-files episode I have ever watched, many years ago, and I was thinking about this... yesterday.

    December 31, 2008

  • "Tossing her head like a royal palfrey embarrassed by its halter of pearls, of an incalculable value but an inconvenient weight, she let fall here and there a soft and charming gaze, of an azure which, as it gradually began to fade, became more caressing still, and greeted most of the departing guests with a friendly nod."

    --Sodom and Gomorrah by Marcel Proust, translated by C.K. Scott Moncrieff and Terence Kilmartin, revised by D.J. Enright, p 163 of the Modern Library paperback edition

    February 6, 2009