knitandpurl has looked up 2690 words, created 11 lists, listed 1934 words, written 1165 comments, added 1 tag, and loved 2 words.

Comments by knitandpurl

  • "In the Neapolitan country, where everybody was a spy, a soldier, a priest, or a lazzarone, the shameless beggars of all four denominations incessantly pounced on the Bottle and made it a pretext for extorting money from me."
    - "The Italian Prisoner" by Charles Dickens, in The Uncommercial Traveller

    July 24, 2016

  • "I wore a suit of barathea I'd ordered special. The only way you can clean that fabric is with gasoline."
    We Love You, Charlie Freeman by Kaitlyn Greenidge, p 233

    July 10, 2016

  • "Every cloud lenites the purple capital letters of the pirouetting peaks of the mountains."
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 169

    June 5, 2016

  • "The Master called me that too, did he. Say it again, Margaret... A bowsie! A bowsie, Margaret!"
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 167

    (http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/bowsie)

    June 5, 2016

  • "Every other day she was choking with a cold. But there wasn't much wrong with her voice on those days. "If I wasn't hoarse," she'd say to you after the funeral, "I would really have keened him." The lying latchico!"
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 141

    June 5, 2016

  • ""You have a crude culchie mind," he said, pissing himself laughing. "They're only pictures. They won't do you any harm.""
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 135

    June 5, 2016

  • "How would Little Kate know anything then, except that her tongue is as long as a langer?"
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 90

    June 5, 2016

  • "...So I only had ten miserable pounds worth of an altar, despite the fact that I shitted bricks chasing every old skanger and scum bucket putting money on their altars."
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 70

    June 5, 2016

  • "I swear you won't hear a bleep or a squeal out of her until she is stuffed up to the oxter."
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 67

    June 5, 2016

  • "But it was when he got really stocious—on a fair day, or a Friday, or whatever—that's when we heard the real fun."
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 52

    June 5, 2016

  • ""Downing poteen like water," she said. Off I went. He was out of his tree and nobody in the house was able to hold him down. You couldn't say they weren't a bunch of wimps..."
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 37

    June 5, 2016

  • "I was spreading a bit of manure for Patrick down in Garry Dyne when one of Tommy's young ones came up to me. "Maggie Frances is dying," she said. And what do you know, Kitty, the young one, was just going in the door when I reached the end of the haggard."
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 7

    June 5, 2016

  • "I have the crucifix on my breast anyway, the one I bought myself at the mission...But where's the black one that Tom's wife, Tom the crawthumper, brought me from Knock, that last time they had to lock him up?"
    The Dirty Dust by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, translated by Alan Titley, p 3

    June 5, 2016

  • "She supposed it was inevitable that, in due time, these men would take those liberties with her that have ever been claimed as angary by irregular fighting men, who have willfully severed themselves from the softening feminine influence of civilized society, with those women who have had the misfortune to become their captives."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 469 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 26, 2016

  • "The unmarked, decussating paths would have been confusing to anyone but a native."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 375 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 25, 2016

  • "As far as Miranda could see—all the way to Nanjing, maybe—it was lined with Western and Nipponese boutiques and department stores, and the airspace above the street was besprent with almond-size aerostats, each with its own cine camera and pattern-recognition ware to watch for suspicious-looking congregations of young men who might be Fist cells."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 297 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 24, 2016

  • "One day a barkentine with red sails appeared in the bay, and a red-headed man with a red beard came to shore."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 197 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 22, 2016

  • "Many of the persons who held such opinions were, of course, guilty of the most nefandous conduct themselves, and yet saw no paradox in holding such views because they were not hypocrites themselves—they took no moral stances and lived by none."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 191 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 22, 2016

  • In The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, the Young Lady's Illustrated Primer is also called a "Propaedeutic Enchiridion" (p 184 of the Spectra trade paperback edition)

    May 22, 2016

  • "preparatory study or instruction", per Merriam-Webster

    In The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, the Young Lady's Illustrated Primer is also called a "Propaedeutic Enchiridion" (p 184 of the Spectra trade paperback edition)

    May 22, 2016

  • "Dr. X was unusually clever at taking advantage of the principle of grith, or right of refuge, which in modern usage simply meant that Coastal Republic officials like Judge Fang could not enter the Celestial Kingdom and arrest someone like Dr. X."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 126 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 19, 2016

  • "The nacelles containing the tiny air turbines, which gave such devices the power to propel themselves through the air, were prominent; it was built for speed."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 98 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 19, 2016

  • "Before long the streets widened, and the hush of tires on pavement blended with the buller of waves against the gradual shores of Pudong."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 84 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 19, 2016

  • "I hope the above poem illuminates the ideas I only touched on during our meeting of Tuesday last, and that it may contribute to your paroemiological studies."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 83 of the Spectra trade paperback

    paroemiology (M-W) is "the subject of proverbs"

    May 19, 2016

  • "This was nothing more than a small propeller, or series of them, mounted in a tubular foramen wrought through the body of the aerostat, drawing in air at one end and forcing it out the other to generate thrust."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 56 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 17, 2016

  • "If a campus was a green quadrilateral described by hulking, hederated Gothics, then this was a campus."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 47 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 17, 2016

  • "Bud had paid a few visits to the local laager, studied some of their training ractives on his home mediatron, put in some extra hours at the gym trying to meet their physical standards, even gone to a couple of horrific bible-study sessions."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 30 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 17, 2016

  • "The engineers of the Royal Vacuum Utility were already at work expanding the eutactic environment."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 36 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 17, 2016

  • "All the other thetes, coarcted into the tacky little claves belonging to their synthetic phyles, turning up their own mediatrons to drown out the Senderos, setting off firecrackers or guns—he could never tell them apart—and a few internal-combustion hobbyists starting up their primitive full-lane vehicles, the louder the better."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 35 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 17, 2016

  • "As soon as he caught Bud's eye, he kicked it up another gear, to a tantivy."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 31 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 17, 2016

  • "There were a bunch of coenobitical phyles—religious tribes—that took people of all races, but most of them weren't very powerful and didn't have turf in the Leased Territories."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 30 of the Spectra trade paperback

    May 17, 2016

  • "Lying as close as it did to Source Victoria, the park was riddled with catachthonic Feed lines, and anything could be grown there on short notice."
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, p 13

    May 15, 2016

  • One of the section titles in The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson is "A thete visits a mod parlor; noteworthy features of modern armaments." Per the Collins English Dictionary (http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/thete), a thete was "a member of the lowest order of freeman in ancient Athens."

    May 15, 2016

  • "It didn't look like a difficult task, since the back of each terrace was studded with all kinds of flues, hooks, windowsills, gas pipes, stringcourses, planks of wood, missing bricks, and irregular patches."
    A Plague of Bogles by Catherine Jinks, p 270 of the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hardcover edition

    April 13, 2016

  • "Christine's Chemin de long estude is a calque of Dante's "lungo studio," that is, Christine explicitly conceives her literary career as a learned continuation in the vernacular of the poetic archievement of Vergil."
    - Earl Jeffrey Richards's Introduction to Christine de Pizan's Book of the City of Ladies, pp xlvii-xlviii of the Persea books 1998 paperback

    January 23, 2016

  • "Her top half was clothed in a spencer, whose hardier material hid the curves her sodden dress could not fail to display. The whole shining sinuous length of her tail emerged from her dress below."
    Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho, p 305

    November 14, 2015

  • "And have you seen this Miss Prunella Gentleman, of whom so much is said?" said Lady Throgmorton, as she sat supping a cup of black bohea with her friend Alethea Gray."
    - Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho, p 226

    November 14, 2015

  • "The Sorcerer Royal's servants had formerly been bond by a geas against disclosure of any detail of his household affairs, breach of which was visited by the most terrible revenge."
    Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho, p 188

    November 14, 2015

  • "Mrs. Lale was a sonsy, comfortable-looking creature, and it seemed as though a smile would better fit her countenance than its angular look of disapprobation."
    Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho, p 123

    November 13, 2015

  • ""You should certainly include a chapter on goety," said Sir Stephen."
    Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho, p 83

    November 12, 2015

  • "He was not exactly ugly (a litotes)."
    Oreo by Fran Ross, p 182 of the New Directions paperback

    October 7, 2015

  • "Oreo held her breath in case she had made a drastic error and had mentioned the roach problem in one of the three buildings in New York that did not have them.
    Mrs. Schwartz gave not an eye-narrow, not a lash-flutter. Oreo was reassured that she had not blown her cover through a blattid blunder."
    - Oreo by Fran Ross, p 176 of the New Directions paperback

    October 7, 2015

  • ""Not speaking, huh? Dicty, ain't you, Miss Siditty? Okay, hello, small stuff," he said in a put-down voice."
    Oreo by Fran Ross, p 149 of the New Directions paperback edition

    October 7, 2015

  • "Occasionally he paused to buff his nails, perking his chest with anseriform hauteur."
    Oreo by Fran Ross, p 147 of the New Directions paperback edition

    October 7, 2015

  • "She also decided that since this was, after all, her quest (so far a matter of low emprise), she would cross all the other clues off her list whenever she felt justified in doing so."
    - Oreo by Fran Ross, p 97 of the New Directions paperback edition

    October 6, 2015

  • "But the Great Report won't be composed in a study; it will come out of the jungle, breaking cover like some colourful, fantastic beast, a species never seen before, a brand-new genus, flashing, sparkling—fulgurating—high above the tree-line, there for all to see."
    Satin Island by Tom McCarthy, p 62 of the Knopf hardcover edition

    July 6, 2015

  • "So the little houses is all forsook. They have big garths round them, and pasture for grass-letting—sheep and that—and grand hayfields."
    - "Bell and Harry" by Jane Gardam, in The Hollow Land, p 11 of the Europa Editions paperback

    April 15, 2015

  • "I hadn't fought ten seconds before I felt this softness in him, realized all that quality of modern upper-class England that never goes to the quick, that hedges about rules and those petty points of honour that are the ultimate comminution of honour, that claims credit for things demonstrably half done."
    Tono-Bungay by H.G. Wells, p 31 of the Everyman paperback

    March 12, 2015

  • "I made the only possible reply by a rush at him. 'Hello!' he cried, at my blackavised attack."
    Tono-Bungay by H.G. Wells, p 31 of the Everyman paperback

    March 12, 2015

  • "A whole time can reduce down to a single taste, a moment. A whole person down to the skelf of a self."
    Hotel World by Ali Smith, pp 37-38 of the Anchor paperback edition

    February 3, 2015

  • "I fancied it was caution, but in truth it was terror—I near bewrayed myself."
    The Accidental Highwayman by Ben Tripp, p 143

    January 12, 2015

  • ""I am not," he said, "having that lummock-de-troll glunching about this place!""
    Enchanted Glass by Diana Wynne Jones, p 38 of the Greenwillow hardcover edition

    January 5, 2015

  • "Or,
    "She goes to sleep on the seat taken from the broken-down bakkie as the husband listens to the radio for news of the uprising—""
    "apartment" by Rachel Zucker, in The Pedestrians

    December 27, 2014

  • "Entering, you first noticed the traditional tokonoma to the immediate right, while a closet took up the rest of that side of the wall."
    The Guest Cat by Takashi Hiraide, translated by Eric Selland, p 21 of the New Directions paperback edition

    October 24, 2014

  • "The creative man will not, then, be he who has deduced something new ex nihilo, btu he who has identified it, by intuition, by trial and error, by chance — or by that infinite patience which for Flaubert was a sign of genius — amid the gangue that enclosed it and concealed it from our eyes."
    - Umberto Eco, in his foreword to Tristano by Nanni Balestrini

    October 15, 2014

  • " ... The sistrums clanked aghast/
    as always and bees unstitched the marjoram as in the old
    time and we non of us thought much about it . ..."
    - "Saps at Sea" by John Ashbery, in Quick Question

    October 11, 2014

  • "O laborers, idle shepherds, come, a truth
    I suspect once you've shifted
    the blame to your flutes come undone,
    I ween. No one knows how much
    we've done to ourselves, nor I to each other,
    cracked, before we were born."
    - "The Queen's Apron" by John Ashbery, in Quick Question

    October 11, 2014

  • "The whole urban chaos spalls and before
    we know it the subject has changed."
    "More Reluctant," in Quick Question by John Ashbery

    October 11, 2014

  • See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belomorkanal

    "The traveller had taken off his cloak and looked very slender and elegant in his pinstripe suit. He was smoking a papirosa and giving instructions at the same time."
    Pietr the Latvian by Georges Simenon, translated by David Bellos, p 11 of the Penguin paperback edition

    October 7, 2014

  • "I did my bit, bringing up those blessed boxes. I leave the titivating to Lilian. She loves all that sort of thing. She can titivate for England, she can."
    The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters, p 18

    September 24, 2014

  • "The pill entered the market in 1996 and quickly became an iatrogenic disaster."
    "The Antidote" by Ian Frazier, p 62 of the New Yorker's September 8, 2014 issue

    September 7, 2014

  • See also http://www.bbc.co.uk/ulsterscots/words/dreigh - dreigh, dreich, dreech are all given as alternative spellings.

    "The dreech weather had drawn in a few more than usual at this time of day but I saw no close acquaintance and I had a mind to drink a quiet pot of tea and glance at the early edition of the evening paper, content in my own company."
    The Mist in the Mirror by Susan Hill, p 4 of the Vintage paperback edition

    September 1, 2014

  • "As evening drew in, we turned a bend and caught a first glimpse of Simla's bungalows and country houses rising up from among the deodars of the ridge."
    City of Djinns by William Dalrymple, p 315

    July 16, 2014

  • "Orbiting the risen thought
    That sang up to the atrament"
    "Sheep Meadow" in The Ground by Rowan Ricardo Phillips

    April 27, 2014

  • "And where once the crowds were mere pent peacocks,
    Twiddling half chatoyances, shimmers in the dark,
    Now only the dancers remain."
    "Aubade: Vol. 2: The Underground Sessions" in "The Ground" by Rowan Ricardo Phillips

    April 27, 2014

  • "Change your name, change your name, the arroba urged."
    - "Apollo: Season Three" in "The Ground" by Rowan Ricardo Phillips

    April 27, 2014

  • "The white rat stepped cautiously into the room, nostrils flaring. Satisfied of its immediate safety, the rat darted up Teo's desk and sat atop her paperwork. It wore black velvet barding blazoned with a silver spiderweb; a leather scroll case the size of a cigarette hung around its neck."
    Two Serpents Rise by Max Gladstone, p 65

    April 20, 2014

  • "You are on the low side of the learning curve and don't even know terrain from terrane."
    John McPhee, in Elicitation, p 50 of the April 7, 2014, issue of the New Yorker

    April 13, 2014

  • "Angelica sniffed the darkness. "Cigars."
    It could have been scillas for all Tonino cared."
    The Magicians of Caprona by Diana Wynne Jones, p 158

    March 15, 2014

  • "Mr. McLintock nodded, with a pawky sort of grin."
    The Chronicles of Chrestomanci, Volume 1 by Diana Wynne Jones, p 538

    March 11, 2014

  • "It is full of people working magic—warlocks, witches, thaumaturges, sorcerers, fakirs, conjurors, hexers, magicians, mages, shamans, diviners, and many more—from the lowest Certified witch right up o the most powerful of enchanters."
    The Chronicles of Chrestomanci, Volume 1, by Diana Wynne Jones

    March 4, 2014

  • "Dallington's story had satisfied both Lenox and Jenkins as to the motivation of the brother and the sister, a long cathectic hatred of Queen Victoria, bred into the bone by their ancestors and their father, and flourishing, perhaps, without the soft guidance of a mother."
    An Old Betrayal by Charles Finch, p 266

    March 4, 2014

  • "Sophronia raised up her Depraved Lens of Crispy Magnification, a present on her fifteenth birthday from Dimity's brother, Pillover. It was essentially a high-powered monocle on a stick, but useful enough to keep at all times hanging from a chatelaine at her waist."
    Curtsies & Conspiracies by Gail Carriger, p 8

    January 28, 2014

  • "In September I planted a line of spruce saplings along the west portico, against the better judgment of Rodgers—and now they have all but one of them died, which I view as final and irrefragable evidence that I have entered my senescence."
    A Death in the Small Hours by Charles Finch, pp 274-275

    January 17, 2014

  • "He helped himself gloomily to salmis of game."
    Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers, p 75

    January 6, 2014

  • "Parker, acushla, you're an honour to Scotland Yard."
    Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers, p 34

    January 5, 2014

  • "Back in her apartment she pins Amsterdam to the wall above her bed, beneath another old postcard: four brightly painted totem poles and a few muskeg spruce, leaning over a marshy inlet."
    Glaciers by Alexis M. Smith, p 13

    January 3, 2014

  • "Then came the strange events that I wrote off at the time as a kind of self-undermining parapraxis. First I forgot to pack the book; then I forgot to collect my bag from the carousel in the airport."
    The End of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas, p 277

    January 1, 2014

  • "It is one of those deep-acting, long-acting antipsoric medicines."
    James Tyler Kent, quoted in The End of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas, p 118

    December 30, 2013

  • "After I've had some soup, I go and get in the bath with two of the homoeopathy books: Kent's Lectures on the Materia Medica and a rather strange-looking volume called Literary Portraits of the Polychrests."
    The End of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas, p 117

    December 30, 2013

  • "Elizabeth, heavily pregnant and desperate, was there waiting while her husband and sons tried to find work in the area, having been turned away from the Tavistock stannary."
    PopCo by Scarlett Thomas, p 172 of the Harcourt paperback edition

    December 1, 2013

  • "Roast chicken and kumera and peas from the back garden, and peaches and nectarines with cream for pudding, and Beverley had been allowed a glass of sherry."
    Kehua! by Fay Weldon, p 185

    October 29, 2013

  • "Beyond the vision of her pumping knees on some desperate errand, and the bloodied dress above them, and playing in the yellow dust under the macrocarpa hedge, and a young women turning cartwheels on the lawn—whom she assumes to be Rita—she has only the scantiest memories of her very early life."
    Kehua! by Fay Weldon, p 130

    October 29, 2013

  • See citation on pohutakawa.

    October 29, 2013

  • "If you go up to Coromandel these days, up to the subtropical North, where the pohutakawa trees line the rocky coast, and the dolphins sport in a warm sea, and in the deep dark kauri forests where the tui birds break the silence and the bellbirds chime, you could well believe that the spirit of the taniwha has been put to sleep."
    Kehua! by Fay Weldon, p 120

    October 29, 2013

  • "I remember what Aroha said about the kehua, the spirits of the homeless dead, and how they like to inhabit animals and birds: the screech of the morepork bird in the velvety Maori night is a case in point."
    Kehua! by Fay Weldon, p 40

    October 27, 2013

  • "The early sun is making the snow sparkle, and the red spindleberries glow in the hedge the far side of the garden, so it's all white, green and red, like the Italian flag."
    Kehua! by Fay Weldon, p 32

    October 27, 2013

  • At the start of Kehua! by Fay Weldon, there's this:
    "May the Maori amongst you excuse this fictional foray
    into your world, for which, believe me,
    I have the greatest respect, having as a child
    in the Coromandel encountered both taniwha and kehua."

    October 26, 2013

  • At the start of Kehua! by Fay Weldon, there's this:
    "May the Maori amongst you excuse this fictional foray
    into your world, for which, believe me,
    I have the greatest respect, having as a child
    in the Coromandel encountered both taniwha and kehua."

    October 26, 2013

  • "And then came the mud. In it sloshed, through the broken windows. Thick mud, watery mud, rocky mud, mud with beveled-glass shards, mud with window muntins, mud with grass, mud with barbecue utensils, mud with a mosaic birdbath."
    Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple, p 76

    October 24, 2013

  • "Turning up the deep astrachan collar of his long coat, the stranger swept out of the shop, with the air, as Miss Fritten afterwards described it, of a Satrap proroguing a Sanhedrin. Whether such a pleasant function ever fell to a Satrap's lot she was not quite certain, but the simile faithfully conveyed her meaning to a large circle of acquaintances."
    "Quail Seed" by Saki, in The Unrest-Cure and Other Stories (p 139 of the NYRB edition)

    October 14, 2013

  • "We managed to get the ponies loose in time, and the syce swam the whole lot of them off to the nearest rising ground."
    "The Guests" by Saki, p 119 of The Unrest-Cure and Other Stories (NYRB Edition)

    October 14, 2013

  • The poultry followed her in interested fashion, and swine grunted interrogations at her from behind the bars of their sties, but barnyard and rickyard, orchard and stables and dairy, gave no reward to her search.
    "The Cobweb" by Saki, p 109 of The Unrest-Cure and Other Stories (NYRB paperback)

    October 14, 2013

  • "And yet, for all that it stood so well in the centre of human bustle, its long, latticed window, with the wide window-seat, built into an embrasure beyond the huge fireplace, looked out on a wild spreading view of hill and heather and wooded combe."
    "The Cobweb" by Saki, p 104 of The Unrest-Cure and Other Stories (NYRB paperback)

    October 14, 2013

  • "As for Cassandra, who was expected to improvise her own prophecies, she appeared to be as incapable of taking flying leaps into futurity as of executing more than a severely plantigrade walk across the stage."
    "The Peace Offering" by Saki, p 75 of The Unrest-Cure and Other Stories (NYRB paperback)

    October 14, 2013

  • September 17, 2013

  • "Now we've seen that justice will collapse through abuse of hendiadys."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 165

    September 17, 2013

  • "Still, despite the tight shackles and endless drudgery, despite the difficulty in dealing with all this, how should I say, journalistic prose--for that's what it is: lifeless, banausic drivel that rushes like a torrent and lacks all color and rhythm, except that it seems to come in waves, but you could at least pace yourselves by contending with these waves one at a time, consider only the number of strokes to be made between each strike of the clock, instead of dwelling on the calendar."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 156

    September 16, 2013

  • "They took refuge in one of the izbas that are found dotted on the outskirts of Xochimilco's teeming suburbs."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 142

    September 16, 2013

  • "The conticent hour
    when the gondola's left for a neighboring dark,"
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 141

    September 16, 2013

  • "So they gathered around a horrible toadstool covered in blemishes and eschars, for these made it look a fitting exemplar, or perhaps it was more a leprous garden gnome, who carried his personal tragedy with him everywhere he went, and because of his dual nationality bumped into us more often than not."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 134

    September 16, 2013

  • "How is it possible that within a belletrist culture like that one, there was so much admiration for the works of Zi--with their soppy sentimentalism and bumpkin sophistication, their bad grammar and archaic anacoluthia, and all those gigantic leaps away from the slightly credible to the wholly fabulous?"
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 129

    September 16, 2013

  • "Beautiful, detailed notation by Aída on pulque and the agave plant."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 121

    September 16, 2013

  • "She opened with a recitation--interspersed with oscitations and eructations--of a monologue by the teenage actress in The Seagull."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 115

    September 16, 2013

  • "His voice was certainly the strangest I've heard from a creature of his kind-- at once surd and resonant, clipped and lyrical, with euphonious vowels broken by brusquely stressed consonants that reminded me a little of Careclough's Scottish brogue."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 114

    September 16, 2013

  • "d) Once the cult of St. Mawr was born, it committed itself to what was called "the small instauration" and to "the little idiom.""
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 106

    September 16, 2013

  • "The most observant of them called the period of caducity "the fall," and he'd usually announce its arrival out loud."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 90

    September 16, 2013

  • "Accents has the original strip of paper a valuable addition to my bibliophile's treasury, which contains a false enthymeme or involuntary syllogism"
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 90

    September 16, 2013

  • "Many years later, once we saw through his mask, that symbol of his claudication, we summoned the image of Von Aschenbach, as interpreted by Dirk Bogarde in the Visconti film (14, reference to Gathorne-Hardy, anecdote in the book about English public schools)."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 77

    September 16, 2013

  • "On the threshold, motionless, stands the invunche."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, pp 71 and 72

    September 16, 2013

  • "A whole argot of sectarian terms to designate where: first, the "paludinal glitterati" in Septic Midrash, then the "phalansterian demographic" constructed to "contradict the anecdote.""
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 68

    September 16, 2013

  • "Since then, having succeeded in restoring them to that previous state in which their livelihoods depended on a meager spring (one that delivers on a monthly basis), he eases a vellication of remorse with the thought that they would be amply remunerated with freedom of time and leisure, although he knows the leisure of redundancy cannot truly be enjoyed."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 55

    September 16, 2013

  • "I feel more assured by the incoherent babbling of a panhandler than by the apodictic pronouncements of philosophers."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 53

    September 16, 2013

  • "Critics and friends had already rebuked him for his honeyed volubility, and also that "nothing to say" which the terricolous Hardy suspected lay behind his ponderous, Tyrian diction."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 52

    September 16, 2013

  • "When he saw them again, on that morning in August after returning from a visit to the city, he found them quite as submissive and conceited as ever; and he, once again trapped in their especial variety of confessional antechamber (in which they oft be labored him with successions of halting effusions), sought escape by firing off--or more properly, stammering--a bêtise on the "perfumed scent" of his butler's arrhythmic respiration, which was indeed perceptible to him in more than one--and to more than one--sense."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 47

    September 16, 2013

  • "For more on the casuistry, the soteriology, and even the proctology of the letter X, see Edgar Lee Meaulnes."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 39

    September 16, 2013

  • "Entre nous, her exuberant flaunting, her canorous bays, are they not in fact . . . symphonies?"
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 16

    September 16, 2013

  • "If pleonasm is the soul of offense, at least I know when to shut up."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 13

    September 16, 2013

  • "If pleonasm is the soul of offense, at least I know when to shut up."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 13

    September 16, 2013

  • "Nicasio sits with his barracan jacket slightly open, his hand reaching--in plenipotentiary gesture--for his wallet ("ample as a library," according to Dos) so he can pay the bill."
    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 7

    September 16, 2013

  • Having now read The No Variations several times in the course of translating and editing, I was continually amused by its author's mock affectations, moved by his corybantic delight in language, and, despite the difficulty, I believe it has that quality proper to all fine literature, which Tertullian first noted of scripture: semper habet aliquid relegentibus, however frequently we read it, we shall always meet with something new."
    Darren Koolman, in his Translator's Preface to The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni

    September 12, 2013

  • The literal meaning of Peripecias del no is "Peripeties of No," but while the title works great in Spanish, in English, it is inkhorn.
    Darren Koolman's Translator's Preface to The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni

    September 12, 2013

  • "Set in an elementary school in Argentina in the early seventies, it is in fact a pasquinade on the bourgeois pretentions and puerile rivalries among Buenos Aires writers and intellectuals at that time."
    Darren Koolman, in his Translator's Preface to The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, p V of the Dalkey Archive Press paperback

    September 10, 2013

  • No such titan ever visited
    during my days as aedile. Yet wisps
    still buttonhole us in random moats:
    - from "Gravy for the Prisoners" by John Ashbery, p 28 of the August 26, 2013 issue of the New Yorker

    September 3, 2013

  • "Video games have turned everyone under the age of 20 into experts on military history and tactics; 12-year-olds on school buses argue about the right way to deploy onagers and cataphracts while outflanking a Roman triplex acies formation."
    "It's All Geek to Me" by Neal Stephenson, pp 60-61 of Some Remarks

    September 2, 2013

  • "Of course the Carbonite stilettos pierced it as if it were cork board, but this spoiled his aim long enough for me to whip my wakizashi out from between my shoulder blades and swing at his head."
    "Slashdot Interview" by Neal Stephenson, p 28 of Some Remarks

    August 29, 2013

  • "Scatter patterns in sand, adnates, cancellates, gaping
    whelk husks, a toy tractor-trailer, cracked
    and dinged, beside the spine of a plastic tree,

    the helmet-shaped shelter of a shadow cast
    by a not-quite-buried wedge of pottery . . ."
    "Hermit Crab" by Stephen Burt, p 28 of the August 5, 2013 issue of the New Yorker

    August 13, 2013

  • "Scatter patterns in sand, adnates, cancellates, gaping
    whelk husks, a toy tractor-trailer, cracked
    and dinged, beside the spine of a plastic tree,

    the helmet-shaped shelter of a shadow cast
    by a not-quite-buried wedge of pottery . . ."
    "Hermit Crab" by Stephen Burt, p 28 of the August 5, 2013 issue of the New Yorker

    August 13, 2013

  • "She sent me out to check ten sycamores at the backs of some houses in Romsey to see whether there was a root problem when it came to the sewers (the sycamores were fine, though a leylandii clump was too close to the houses by far) and by the time I got back to work she'd sent me an email saying I'd been assigned next week off, on half-pay—in October, which is one of our busiest times."
    Artful by Ali Smith, p 57

    August 3, 2013

  • "What is this picture but a fragment?
    Is it linen—papyrus—who can say?
    All those stains and fents and stretched bits, but
    she was a character, even a beauty, you can see that
    from the set of her head and the rakish snood
    her tight black curls are fighting to escape from."

    "The Sandal" by Edwin Morgan, quoted in Artful by Ali Smith, pp 25-26

    August 2, 2013

  • "You laugh out loud and tell me what Angela Carter said about that 'fubsy beast': she thought he looked more like a pajama case than a tiger. I go away and look up the word fubsy. I've never heard it before."
    Artful by Ali Smith, p 16

    August 2, 2013

  • "He hangs his distinctive coat on a peg and says, "I have found a wonderful subject for you: Stesichorus's palinode ..." Yes, I can still see Mr. Bailly very clearly."
    Climates by André Maurois, translated by Adriana Hunter, p 11 of the Other Press paperback edition

    July 23, 2013

  • "Steeplebush flourished by some other name, lost ow, long before there were steeples."
    "Neon" by Carl Phillips, in Silverchest (p 24)

    July 22, 2013

  • "Set free from carking care and amply provided for, we were able to give most of our time and energy to our real profession – which, of course, is Sapping – and so moving northward and then westward we presently arrived, after a leisurely but eventful journey, much of it very comfortably underground, at the eastern border of Bombardy."
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 335 of the New York Review of Books edition

    July 19, 2013

  • "Set free from carking care and amply provided for, we were able to give most of our time and energy to our real profession – which, of course, is Sapping – and so moving northward and then westward we presently arrived, after a leisurely but eventful journey, much of it very comfortably underground, at the eastern border of Bombardy."
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 335 of the New York Review of Books edition

    July 19, 2013

  • "The Judge, as it happened, was playing clock-golf with his Cook, and his two maids were watching, so there was some delay before the visitors were admitted."
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 205 of the New York Review of Books hardcover

    July 17, 2013

  • "Are you quite sure, Mrs. Wellaby, that you haven't committed even the least little tiny tort in the last few days? Because I am ready, now as ever, to defend you against any accusation whatsoever, no matter whether it be barratry or illicit diamond-buying, forgery or coining, breach of promise to marry, or armed resistance to capture."
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 199 of the New York Review of Books hardcover

    July 17, 2013

  • "'Because you're a stiff-necked, rascally, rebellious, unruly rout of predestined skilly-swillers,' he would yell."
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 185 of the New York Review of Books hardcover

    July 17, 2013

  • "He wore a canvas jacket, whipcord breeches, and a bowler hat."
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 75 of the New York Review of Books hardcover

    July 17, 2013

  • "For tea they had scones and pancakes, crumpets and pikelets, muffins and cream buns, plum cake and seed cake and cream cake and chocolate cake, and often some bread and butter as well."
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 23 of the New York Review of Books hardcover

    July 17, 2013

  • "It was a pleasant room with a window facing south, a satinwood bed, a satinwood dressing-table, and a satinwood writing desk at which Miss Serendip used to sit and write letters to her seven sisters"
    The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater, p 19 of the New York Review of Books hardcover

    July 17, 2013

  • "These rackets are strange: they look like "old rackets" (like violas to violins, crumhorns to bassoons); one of them has an extremely large wooden frame and the racket itself (the stringed part) is a tiny round (not oval) hole that is obviously stringless."
    La Boutique Obscure: 124 Dreams by Georges Perec, translated by Daniel Levin Becker

    July 8, 2013

  • "On the second floor of the Opera atelier, Anna Maria sat at a dressing table with a small mirror, took a round etui from her pocket, extracted the reddened cotton wad, spit on it, and blotted her lips."
    The Stockholm Octavo by Karen Engelmann, p 162

    July 2, 2013

  • "Miss Hagman had the perfect life: a luxurious apartment, more than adequate means, and she was free to be a coryphée, to socialize with all manner of people—from royalty to artists."
    The Stockholm Octavo by Karen Engelmann, p 157

    July 2, 2013

  • "It was Sunday, a popular night for balls and fetes, and I could hear the distant blast of a waldhorn signaling a bacchanal."
    The Stockholm Octavo by Karen Engelmann, p 13

    June 27, 2013

  • "From the Wikipedia entry for "thyrsus":
    In Greek mythology, a staff of giant fennel (Ferula communis) covered with ivy vines and leaves, sometimes wound with taeniae and always topped with a pine cone."
    - from The Magic Circle by Jenny Davidson, p 131

    June 1, 2013

  • ""I'll see a lion, a tiger, a jackal. I'll be attacked by a naja cobra, and a gharial. I'll rescue a child from the claws of a condor."
    My Beautiful Bus by Jacques Jouet, translated by Eric Lamb, p 83

    May 23, 2013

  • "Then ask him if he wouldn't happen to have some glasswort, and if not than percebes, or goose barnacles, those little crustaceans like the ones you find in Galicia and the Madrilenian markets."
    My Beautiful Bus by Jacques Jouet, translated by Eric Lamb, p 45

    May 22, 2013

  • "The remnants of a lacy filibeg clung to the twisted circlets of the Crimson crown, its garnets glinting dully, and the Punctilious Trousers bore unpleasant stains."
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 239 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • "Saloona observed an urceolate figure who held a jeroboam of frothing liquor."
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 239 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • "She gestured at the waiting cabriolets and winged caravans, parked alongside the bridled destriers and sleeping gorgosaurs that lined the long curving drive."
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 236 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • ""The Crimson Court has a legendary kitchen. Too long have you languished here among your toadstools and toxic chanterells, Saloona Morn! At great danger to myself, I have secured you an invitation so that you may sample the Paeolinas' nettlefish froth and their fine baked viands, also a cellar known throughout the Metarin Mountains for vintages as rare as they are temulent. Still you remain skeptical of my motivations.""
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 225 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • ""You require the use of my prism ship and my fungal electuaries. I remain uncertain of the benefits to myself.""
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 225 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • ""An ustulating spell directed at his paramour's bathing chamber. The squireen has been reduced to ash. The optimate's need to retain his affection has therefore diminished.""
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 223 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • ""The Queen was not aware of it either," replied Paytim. "Her brother poisoned her and seized control of the Crimson Messuage. He has impertinently invited me to attend his coronoation as Paeolina the Twenty-Ninth.""
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 221 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • "Clans have fought and died over this periapt."
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 217 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • "When the dishes were cleared and the last of the locust jelly spooned from a shared bowl, Paytim poured two jiggers of amber whiskey. She removed a pair of red-hot pokers from the kitchen athanor, plunged one into each jigger, then dropped the spent pokers into the sink."
    "The Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 216 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    May 1, 2013

  • "Insensibility, melancholia, hebetude; ordinary mental tumult and more elaborate physical vexations (boils, a variety of thrip that caused the skin of an unfaithful lover to erupt in a spectacular rash, the color of violet mallows)—Saloona Morn cultivated these in her parterre in the shadow of Cobalt Mountain."
    "Return of the Fire Witch" by Elizabeth Hand, p 209 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    April 29, 2013

  • "His former colleagues were now living eidolons of youth, beauty, health, joy, desire flitting past him in the studio, lovely and remote as figures from a medieval allegory."
    - "The Far Shore" by Elizabeth Hand, p 130 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    April 28, 2013

  • "Its scales rose to form a stiff, brilliantly colored armor, a farthingale glimmering every shade of violet and green."
    "Hungerford Bridge" by Elizabeth Hand: p 122 of Errantry: Strange Stories

    April 28, 2013

  • "Today, I blame myself for my irenicism: I should never have allowed the issue of Les Temps modernes on the Arab–Israeli conflict to open with Rodinson's article, 'Israel, a Colonial Reality?', for I do not believe that this is, or has ever been, the case: in my films and in my writings, I have striven tirelessly to reveal the complex reality of Israel."
    The Patagonian Hare by Claude Lanzmann, translated by Frank Wynne, p 399-400 of the Farrar, Straus and Giroux hardcover edition

    April 19, 2013

  • "To get from Beijing to Pyongyang, one went either by rail or by air: the first entailed a forty-eight-hour journey with a stop of indeterminate length at the Sino-Korean border before travelling north at a snail's pace through the septentrional regions of North Korea since there had recently been a catastrophic explosion that had destroyed a railway station and two trains, resulting in countless victims."
    The Patagonian Hare by Claude Lanzmann, translated by Frank Wynne, p 315 of the Farrar, Straus and Giroux hardcover edition

    April 18, 2013

  • "I didn't feel qualified, but I accepted and we began to work, proceeding by a Socratic, maieutic method – which is something I'm rather good at."
    The Patagonian Hare by Claude Lanzmann, p 191 of the Farrar, Straus and Giroux hardcover edition

    April 16, 2013

  • "It was over Duelo a garrotazos that I had apagogically envisaged rolling the opening credits for my film Tsahal, about the Israeli army and the wars it was compelled to fight."
    The Patagonian Hare by Claude Lanzmann, translated by Frank Wynne, p 31 of the Farrar, Straus and Giroux hardcover edition

    April 9, 2013

  • "Thus all they had to select from was tea, bread and sweet butter, porridge, ham and broiled mushrooms, rabbit pie, fricandeau of eggs, mayonnaise of prawns, and spiced beef."
    Etiquette & Espionage by Gail Carriger, p 121

    March 11, 2013

  • "Instead he listens, just in case Tom gets tripped up in the briar patch of plesiosynchronous protocol arcana, whence only Randy can drag him out."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 406 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    February 3, 2013

  • "Lord Woadmire is not related to the original line of Qwghlm, the Moore family (Anglicized from the Qwghlmian clan name Mnyhrrgh) which had been terminated in 1888 by a spectacularly improbable combination of schistosomiasis, suicide, long-festering Crimean war wounds, ball lightning, flawed cannon, falls from horses, improperly canned oysters, and rogue waves."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 255 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 30, 2013

  • "Propped up against the stonework next to the building's entrance is a gaffer dressed in an antique variant of the Home Guard uniform, involving knickerbockers."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 253 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 30, 2013

  • "He swings it on the end of its wristband, made in cunningly joined armor plates. It is heavy enough to stun a muskellunge."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 192 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 28, 2013

  • "As a result, the authorities of his country, the United States of America, have made him swear a mickle oath of secrecy, and keep supplying him with new uniforms of various services and ranks, and now have sent him to London."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 146 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 28, 2013

  • I didn't know the military meaning of this, as in:
    "The Marines charge the wastebaskets as if they were Nip pillboxes, and Lieutenant Ethridge seems mollified."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 189 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 28, 2013

  • "Soon they are standing before the fort's entrance, which is flanked by carvings of a pair of guards cut into the foamy volcanic tuff: halberd-brandishing Spaniards in blousy pants and conquistador helmets."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 121 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 26, 2013

  • "The United States part is, however, a safe bet, because every time he arrives at a curb, he either comes close to being run over by shooting-brake or he falters in his stride; diverts his train of thought onto a siding, much to the disturbance of its passengers and crew; and throws some large part of his mental calculation circuitry into the job of trying to reflect his surroundings through a large mirror. They drive on the left side of the street here."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, pp 143-144 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 26, 2013

  • "Farther south, the mountains are swidden-scarred—the soil beneath is bright red and so these parts look like fresh lacerations."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 32 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 22, 2013

  • "The speed and power of their growth is alarming, the forms they adopt as bizarre and varied as those of deep-sea organisms, and all of them, he supposes, are as dangerous to an airplane as punji stakes to a barefoot pedestrian."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 30 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 22, 2013

  • "The duralumin struts and catwalks rambled on above him for miles."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 23 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 21, 2013

  • ""Yes! Russell and Whitehead. It's like this: when mathematicians began fooling around with things like the square root of negative one, and quaternions, then they were no longer dealing with things that you could translate into sticks and bottlecaps. And yet they were still getting sound results."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 18 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 21, 2013

  • "For each stop—each timbre, or type of sound, that the organ could make (viz. blockflöte, trumpet, piccolo)—there was a separate row of pipes, arranged in a line from long to short."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 8 of the Avon Books paperback edition

    January 20, 2013

  • "But when a hornet got into the house and swung across the ceiling in a broad Lissajous, droning almost inaudibly, he cried in pain at the noise."
    Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, p 7 of the Avon paperback edition

    January 20, 2013

  • "With only a few days to listen to the recordings, make notes, digest files from Time correspondents, read morgue clippings, and skim through several books, I was soon sprawled on the floor at home, surrounded by drifts of undifferentiated paper, and near tears in a catatonic swivet."
    - "Structure" by John McPhee, p 46 of the January 14, 2013 issue of the New Yorker

    January 15, 2013

  • I'd never heard this as a verb, I don't think! As in:
    "Maureen emerged from behind the counter in her short black dress and frilly apron, and Shirley corpsed into her coffee."
    The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling, p 351

    January 10, 2013

  • "It was all very confusing, and she continued to enjoy Easter eggs and decorating the Christmas tree, and found the books that Parminder pressed upon her children, explaining the lives of the gurus and the tenets of Khalsa, extremely difficult to read."
    The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling, p 301

    January 10, 2013

  • ""And what about you?" Simon roared at his wife, who was still frozen beside the computer, her eyes wide behind her glasses, her hand clamped like a yashmak over her mouth."
    The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling, p 283

    January 10, 2013

  • "Nobody came in answer to the bell, but she could hear a small child grizzling through the ground-floor window on her left, which was ajar."
    The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling, p 66

    January 10, 2013

  • "I found I was a bit cold-pigged—drained, not dried entirely."
    "Hello! Hi! Hello!" by Diane Williams, in Vicky Swanky Is a Beauty, p 111

    January 1, 2013

  • "He carves horses and he paints a whole group on their points of hips, the throatlatches, on the tails, and so forth."
    - "One of the Great Drawbacks" by Diane Williams, in Vicky Swanky Is a Beauty (p 75)

    January 1, 2013

  • "A woman who took orders there popped a lozenge the color of bixbite into her mouth."
    - "Give Them Stuff" by Diane Williams, in Vicky Swanky Is a Beauty (p 55)

    January 1, 2013

  • ""Can I see that?" he said, "What is that?"
    It was a baby porringer."
    "On the Job" by Diane Williams, in Vicky Swanky Is a Beauty, p 29

    December 31, 2012

  • "I crossed the street to survey the lake and I heard crepitations—three little girls bouncing their ball."
    "My Defects" by Diane Williams, in Vicky Swanky Is a Beauty (p 13)

    December 31, 2012

  • "Lawrence Lessig, the whilom Special Master in the Justice Department's antitrust suit against Microsoft, complained that he had installed Internet Explorer on his computer, and in so doing, lost all of his bookmarks--his personal list of signposts that he used to navigate through the maze of the Internet."
    - "In the Beginning was the Command Line" by Neal Stephenson

    December 24, 2012

  • "She was around fifty, garishly painted and dressed in the faded style of a older generation, in a worn silk paletot."
    The Thing about Thugs by Tabish Khair, p 195

    December 24, 2012

  • "As if the spectres with which he paid for his passage to England, the soucouyants with which he revenged his uncle and family, all those bloodthirsty ghosts of his narrative have come alive in this city."
    The Thing about Thugs by Tabish Khair, p 191

    December 24, 2012

  • "By now Amir has become used to the overbearing smells of London houses, especially around the kitchen: the odours, he feels, are stronger and more basic — burnt meat, boiled vegetables — than in respectable houses in his village, which are open to the cleansing air, purified by agarbattis."
    The Thing about Thugs by Tabish Khair, p 105

    December 23, 2012

  • "The matter was brought before the village panchayat, which had assembled, as was the custom, under the peepal tree in the village square."
    The Thing about Thugs by Tabish Khair, p 49

    December 19, 2012

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficus_religiosa

    December 19, 2012

  • "Little good it did him though, this facing of a new future, the diligence with which he, in his youth, worked as a munshi before the death of his father called him back to the land, and the way in which he set himself to learn the customs and language of the Firangs."
    The Thing about Thugs by Tabish Khair, pp 25-26

    December 19, 2012

  • "I had always admired Hamid Bhai's ability to guess where the cut kite would alight, just as I admired his capacity to hold his breath for so long during our games of kabbadi."
    The Thing about Thugs by Tabish Khair, p 24

    December 19, 2012

  • "Sign language has its own syntax patterns, dialects and accents (American Southerners are known for "blurry" signing), and even usage experts, who teach native signers to use the language with concinnity."
    "Little Strangers" by Nathan Heller, p 89 of the November 19, 2012 issue of the New Yorker

    November 29, 2012

  • "Composed of Paste and glued with Tragacanth, the Theme of this Device was an heroic Feat known as 'Callock's Leap'."
    John Saturnall's Feast by Lawrence Norfolk, p 391

    November 10, 2012

  • "From his command post in the doorway of the Great Hall, Mister Pouncey pondered lists of secretaries and seal-keepers, council clerks and sergeants-at-arms. Was the Clerk of Petty Bag senior to a gentleman groom? he wondered. How important was the Keeper of the Hanaper, or the Chafe Wax?"
    John Saturnall's Feast by Lawrence Norfolk, p 214

    November 10, 2012

Comments for knitandpurl

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  • I suspect you have an open italic bracket in your comment on terrane because it is italicising the front page no end.

    April 13, 2014

  • yarb, thanks - you're right that a Witch Grass list would be fun - maybe if I re-read it ... :)

    November 11, 2010

  • I'm very much enjoying your Witch Grass gleanings. They deserve their own list.

    November 9, 2010

  • Hey k&p! Good to see you around again :-)

    December 23, 2009

  • Thank you for listing the word "yowdendrift". I didn't know of it. It's beautiful.

    July 14, 2009

  • Hi enjoyed your list!
    Could you add a word to my list??
    I just began to use this site and I am learning how to use it.
    Thanks!

    June 15, 2008

  • Hi K&P,
    I have been enjoying your list, and particulaly like your username. Good to see you around!

    July 21, 2007