Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A dry scab or slough formed on the skin as a result of a burn or by the action of a corrosive or caustic substance.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In pathology, a crust or scab on the skin, such as is occasioned by a burn or caustic application, and which sloughs off.
  • noun See eskar.
  • noun Same as slough, 2.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Med.) A dry slough, crust, or scab, which separates from the healthy part of the body, as that produced by a burn, or the application of caustics.
  • noun (Geol.) In Ireland, one of the continuous mounds or ridges of gravelly and sandy drift which extend for many miles over the surface of the country. Similar ridges in Scotland are called kames or kams.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A dry, dark scab or scar, especially as a result of burning.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a dry scab formed on the skin following a burn or cauterization of the skin

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English escare, from Old French; see scar.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French eschare (now escarre) or Late Latin eschara ("scar, scab"), from (ancient?) Greek εσχαρα ‘hearth, brazier, scab’.

Examples

    Sorry, no example sentences found.

Comments

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  • "In Ireland, one of the continuous mounds or ridges of gravelly and sandy drift which extend for many miles over the surface of the country. Similar ridges in Scotland are called kames or kams." --Webster's

    March 16, 2012

  • The terms kame and eskar are bona fide periglacial geology and geomorphology terms.

    March 16, 2012

  • "So they gathered around a horrible toadstool covered in blemishes and eschars, for these made it look a fitting exemplar, or perhaps it was more a leprous garden gnome, who carried his personal tragedy with him everywhere he went, and because of his dual nationality bumped into us more often than not."

    The No Variations by Luis Chitarroni, translated by Darren Koolman, p 134

    September 16, 2013

  • Mon Dieu! What a dégoutant deed!

    Cette blessure est vraiment putride!

    When you have an eschar

    You tend to it, n'est-ce pas?

    America, please now debride.

    November 21, 2016