Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A usually ornamental tuft, ridge, or similar projection on the head of a bird or other animal.
  • n. An elevated, irregularly toothed ridge on the stigmas of certain flowers.
  • n. A ridge or an appendage on a plant part, such as on a leaf or petal.
  • n. A plume used as decoration on top of a helmet.
  • n. A helmet.
  • n. Heraldry A device placed above the shield on a coat of arms.
  • n. A representation of such a device.
  • n. The top, as of a hill or wave.
  • n. The highest or culminating point; the peak: the crest of a flood; at the crest of her career.
  • n. The ridge on a roof.
  • transitive v. To decorate or furnish with a crest.
  • transitive v. To reach the crest of: crested the ridge.
  • intransitive v. To form into a crest or crests: waves cresting over the seawall.
  • intransitive v. To reach a crest: The swollen river crested at 9 P.M.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tuft, or other excrescence or natural ornament, growing on an animal's head; the comb of a cock; the swelling on the head of a serpent; the lengthened feathers of the crown or nape of bird, etc.
  • n. The plume of feathers, or other decoration, worn on or displayed on a helmet; the distinctive ornament of a helmet.
  • n. : A bearing worn, not upon the shield, but usually on a helmet above it, sometimes (as for clerics) separately above the shield or separately as a mark for plate, in letterheads, and the like.
  • n. The upper curve of a horse's neck.
  • n. The ridge or top of a wave.
  • n. The summit of a hill or mountain ridge.
  • n. The helm or head, as typical of a high spirit; pride; courage.
  • n. The ornamental finishing which surmounts the ridge of a roof, canopy, etc.
  • n. The top line of a slope or embankment.
  • n. A design or logo, especially one of an institution, association or high-class family.
  • v. Particularly with reference to waves, to reach a peak.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A tuft, or other excrescence or natural ornament, growing on an animal's head; the comb of a cock; the swelling on the head of a serpent; the lengthened feathers of the crown or nape of bird, etc.
  • n. The plume of feathers, or other decoration, worn on a helmet; the distinctive ornament of a helmet, indicating the rank of the wearer; hence, also, the helmet.
  • n. A bearing worn, not upon the shield, but usually above it, or separately as an ornament for plate, liveries, and the like. It is a relic of the ancient cognizance. See Cognizance, 4.
  • n. The upper curve of a horse's neck.
  • n. The ridge or top of a wave.
  • n. The summit of a hill or mountain ridge.
  • n. The helm or head, as typical of a high spirit; pride; courage.
  • n. The ornamental finishing which surmounts the ridge of a roof, canopy, etc.
  • n. The top line of a slope or embankment.
  • intransitive v. To form a crest.
  • transitive v. To furnish with, or surmount as, a crest; to serve as a crest for.
  • transitive v. To mark with lines or streaks, like, or regarded as like, waving plumes.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To furnish with a crest; serve as a crest for; surmount as a crest.
  • To mark with waving lines like the plumes of a helmet; adorn as with a plume or crest.
  • To reach, as a wave, the highest point; culminate.
  • n. A tuft or other natural process growing upon the top of an animal's head, as the comb of a cock, a swelling on the head of a serpent, etc. See crista.
  • n. Anything resembling, suggestive of, or occupying the same relative position as a crest.
  • n. In heraldry, a part of an achievement borne outside of and above the escutcheon. There are sometimes two crests, which are borne on the sides. When the crest is not specially mentioned as emerging from a coronet, chapeau, or the like, it is assumed to be borne upon a wreath. A crest is not properly borne by a woman, or by a city or other corporate body, as it is always assumed to be the ornament worn upon the helmet.
  • n. The foamy, feather-like top of a wave.
  • n. The highest part or summit of a hill or mountain-range.
  • n. In fortification, the top line of a slope.
  • n. In architecture, any ornamental finishing of stone, terra-cotta, metal, or wood, which surmounts a wall, roof-ridge, screen, canopy, or other similar part of a building—whether a battlement, open carved work, or other enrichment; the coping on the parapet of a medieval building; a cresting (which see). The name is also sometimes given to the finials of gables and pinnacles.
  • n. In anatomy, specifically, a ridge on a bone: as, the occipital crest; the frontal crest; the tibial crest. See phrases below, and crista.
  • n. In zoology, any elongate elevation occupying the highest part of a surface. Specifically— A longitudinal central elevation, with an irregular or tuberculose summit, on the prothorax of an insect, especially of a grasshopper. A longitudinal elevated tuft of hairs or scales on the head, thorax, or abdominal segments of a lepidopterous insect.
  • n. In botany: An elevated line, ridge, or lamina on the surface or at the summit of an organ, especially if resembling the crest of a helmet. An appendage to the upper surface of the leaves of curtain Hepaticæ, which in different genera has the form of a wing, a fold, or a pouch.
  • n. The rising part or the ridge of the neck of a horse or a dog.
  • n. Figuratively, pride; high spirit; courage; daring.
  • n. See dicrotic.
  • n. In ornithology, a crest of feathers rising from the front or forehead. Such crests are among the most elegant which birds possess. The cedar-bird or Carolina waxwing and the cardinal red-bird exhibit such crests. They are often recurved, as in the plumed quail of the genus Lophortyx.
  • n. A transverse ridge on the hinder part of the skull of some animals, separating the occipital portion from the parietal or vertical portion.
  • n. In ornithology, a tuft of feathers growing from the hindhead.
  • n.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the top or extreme point of something (usually a mountain or hill)
  • v. lie at the top of
  • n. a showy growth of e.g. feathers or skin on the head of a bird or other animal
  • v. reach a high point
  • n. (heraldry) in medieval times, an emblem used to decorate a helmet
  • n. the top line of a hill, mountain, or wave
  • n. the center of a cambered road

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English creste, from Old French, from Latin crista; see sker-2 in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English creste, from Old French creste (modern crête), from Latin crista.

Examples

  • • In a story about the new coat of arms commissioned by Kate Middleton's family, the term crest was used as a synonym for coat of arms.

    Corrections and clarifications

  • What happens can be likened to Sisyphus´ endlessly rolling his stone up the slope, but in this case finding that the slope beyond the crest is also an uphill one.

    Press Release: The 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics

  • To the east his eyes, leaping the miles between range and range and between many ranges, brought up at last against the white-peaked Sierras — the main crest, where the backbone of the Western world reared itself against the sky.

    All Gold Cañon

  • Benfica shirt crest is embroidered on the front of the left chest of shirt, with three star is embroidered above the crest.

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • Chelsea lion crest is printed on the back bellow of the shirts.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • The club crest is on the top left of the shirt with club sponsor sapoadsl having their logo in the center of the shirt.

    SL Benfica 2008/09 team kits

  • Club crest is embroidered on the front of the left chest of shirt, with three star is embroidered above the crest.

    SL Benfica 2008/09 team kits

  • To the east his eyes, leaping the miles between range and range and between many ranges, brought up at last against the white-peaked Sierras -- the main crest, where the backbone of the Western world reared itself against the sky.

    All Gold Canon

  • For example, a TV or radio tower on council crest is cooking the heck out of everyone within a mile while people in Hillsboro are merely lukewarm.

    Coming soon to that telephone pole outside your house (Jack Bog's Blog)

  • According to ornithologists, the bird on the national crest is most likely to be a Crested Cara-Cara (Polyborus plancus).

    Did You Know? Some national symbols in Mexico are not what they seem

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